GEN3 Outcross - A Good Budget E-bike?

smnnkd

New Member
Region
USA
Hello All. I'm new to Ebikes, but have been occasionally commuting (11 mi one-way) using my decade old Trek 7100. I was transferred to a different office that is 14 mile away from home, but the commute would be a bit more hilly. I need a little more help on those hills - especially to get home. I'm 60 and just want a little help. I've been considering the GEN3 Outcross - a fat tire, 7-speed E-bike. The price is right, and the size seems to be perfect. I live in San Diego, CA so weather not a concern. Since I don't hear about this company on this forum, I'm looking for some help in determining if this is a bad choice.

Steve, in San Diego, CA
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
That bike comes with cable mechanical brakes (not hydraulic), press-fit (I think) chain rings, 48V 10.4Ah battery, etc.

Have you VoltBike Yukon?
It comes with 48V 19.2Ah battery, hydraulic brakes, fenders, racks, etc.

RadRover 5 is on sale at $1599
Although it only comes with cable mechanical brakes, RadRover has very good aftermarket support, if you decide to upgrade it later.
It also comes with 48V 14Ah battery.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Don't know why you want fat tires for paved road use. They eat watthours. Your spine injured maybe? I do okay on 2.1" tires and I'm age 71. Fat tires are reputedly hard to get off the rim by the side of the road, too. Plus at age 55 I started having trouble getting my leg over the seat & rack. Drop frame for me.
I like cable pull disk brakes fine, but yuba used real steel cables that don't require monthly adjustment like the grey metal most cheap bikes use. Speaking of cheap bikes how do you like replacing spokes and re-truing the wheel? one at a time as the vendor mails you free replacements. Another place grey metal is seriously popular if first price is the main sales point. Some brands have trouble with the wheel fracturing at the spoke holes.
Look at the Rad brand forum known problems thread before you leap, lots of entries. A fractured frame at the seat post showed up today. Fractured frame got the owner a $250 coupon on a new rad bike. https://electricbikereview.com/foru...p-with-final-decision-for-64-280-frame.46748/
Trek, giant, orbea, gazelle, cannondale sell bikes of real metal. If I really didn't want to go over $2000 to prevent theft, I'd try a blix. They have a short known problems list, one entry. Aveny has fenders & a rack. Packa has a stretch frame like the yuba bike left that has not thrown me in 8000 miles. MTB's & cruisers pitched me on my chin 5 times since 2008 before I parked them.
 
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smnnkd

New Member
Region
USA
@indianajo - Thanks so much for taking the time to respond and provide meaningful feedback. I'm used to riding on 700C tires, and really like how they roll. While my main use will be pavement, I also want a bike I can use to ride up a nearby mountain service road or two. Maybe I should just consider a dedicated commuter style bike. Again, thanks! And good for you for riding at 70-ish years young!
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I can use to ride up a nearby mountain service road or two.
You do not need a fat bike for riding mountain service roads either... Fat bike habitat is sand, deep snow, and morass. Gravel cyclists ride off-road on 1.5" tyres. And here...

1640584778148.png

A mid-drive e-bike on 29 x 2" tires at 20 F, snow, ice, forest, hill. Yes, it is studded tires here.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Fat tires, unless you want them just 'cuz, are justified only by their ability to float on top of very loose surfaces. More conventional tires in the 2.25"-2.8" widths can ride as well, and offer much less rolling resistance.

The other thing is, and it catches a LOT of people off guard, is the fact the fat tire bikes (26x4.0 tires) are HUGE. They are physically very large bikes!

Another vote for not being the best choice for paved only surfaces..... Been there and didn't care for it.

Love RAD, but maybe something like their newest 'City (with geared rear hub) might make a better commuter/hybrid bike.....


 

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
If your budget is 2,000 or less, there’s many options available.
That’s a fabulous commute one way. Would a speed ebike (28 mph/45 mph) be part of your consideration?
Your test rides will help narrow the field considerably. Hub drives, mid drives, components, etc, lots to choose.
Send a picture of your smiling face when you fly up your first hill!!
 

Elkman

Active Member
Hello All. I'm new to Ebikes, but have been occasionally commuting (11 mi one-way) using my decade old Trek 7100. I was transferred to a different office that is 14 mile away from home, but the commute would be a bit more hilly. I need a little more help on those hills - especially to get home. I'm 60 and just want a little help. I've been considering the GEN3 Outcross - a fat tire, 7-speed E-bike. The price is right, and the size seems to be perfect. I live in San Diego, CA so weather not a concern. Since I don't hear about this company on this forum, I'm looking for some help in determining if this is a bad choice.

Steve, in San Diego, CA
A fat tire bike is a big step backwards. Consider instead a "commuter" e-bike which will have full size 2" tires as with the REI CTY e2.1 with 27.5x1.95 tires and a easily removable battery pack for charging or going up stairs and a good rear rack and integrated head and tail lamps. Add fenders and you are good to go. Only problem with the REI e-bike is that the rims and tires are not tubeless compatible but if you avoid the gutters the odds of a puncture are pretty low.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
2" tires will get you there and back. Little doubt there. But if the bike's ride is a factor, there's a very noticeable difference going from 1.95-2.10" up to 2.3-2.5". They are generally capable of supporting the same weight at a lower pressure - resulting in a smoother ride. Some, like the Schwalbe Super Moto-X and Big Apple run that lower pressure AND feature a very low rolling resistance while doing that. A win-win if there ever was one.

If you want to maximize flat resistance, use your favorite brand of sealant as preventative measure. I use Slime because everyone knows what it is, it's easy to find everywhere, it's easy to install (any brand), and it works!