General Creo questions

AzDave

Member
Region
USA
Ok new Creo expert owner here...out of curiosity anyone have any info on where to buy and cost to replace the SL1-320 battery that comes internally in the bike? I read it has a 500 charge cycle life so was just thinking down the road...My wife has a Como 3.0 and there is plenty of info on battery replacement/upgrade for her bike but the Creo internal battery seems like a secret. Yeah you could say just get the range extender for about $500 but I want that space for my water...lol. Really though...what gives about that internal battery and what do us Creo owners have to know?
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
I might be wrong but I think that the same batteries are used in other Specialized SL models. I would have to guess that replacements will be available if and when needed.

But I'd also guess that Specialized would hope you just buy a new bike! :oops:
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
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the battery is most definitely available to your specialized dealer as a replacement part. it's not crazy hard to get in and out, just not something they want you to do at home. obviously no need to replace the whole bike!
 

AzDave

Member
Region
USA
View attachment 96809

the battery is most definitely available to your specialized dealer as a replacement part. it's not crazy hard to get in and out, just not something they want you to do at home. obviously no need to replace the whole bike!
That makes sense. I guess as far as cost I'll probably only find that out when the moment arises.
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
View attachment 96809

the battery is most definitely available to your specialized dealer as a replacement part. it's not crazy hard to get in and out, just not something they want you to do at home. obviously no need to replace the whole bike!
I have read to take the Creo/others on planes, battery removal has been done and then folks use Range Extenders to power the bike. Range Extenders qualify for flying whereas the main battery is too powerful on planes. There are videos on the process.
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I have read to take the Creo/others on planes, battery removal has been done and then folks use Range Extenders to power the bike. Range Extenders qualify for flying whereas the main battery is too powerful on planes. There are videos on the process.
yep.

i was thinking about trying this just for day to day usage to see if the weight reduction was meaningful, since i have never come anywhere near using the whole battery! it would also be cool to be able to just ride with no battery for the many rides i do without using any assist, saving even more weight!
 

AzDave

Member
Region
USA
yep.

i was thinking about trying this just for day to day usage to see if the weight reduction was meaningful, since i have never come anywhere near using the whole battery! it would also be cool to be able to just ride with no battery for the many rides i do without using any assist, saving even more weight!
And you can take out the motor to save even more! 😂😂🤣
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
And you can take out the motor to save even more! 😂😂🤣

Weights:

Range Extender: 1kg (2.2lbs)
Internal battery (called the SL1-320): 1.8kg (3.96lbs)
SL 1.1 motor: 1.95kg (4.3lbs)

I don't recall if the motor can be removed and leave a working drive train.
 
Last edited:

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Weights:

1kg Range Extender (2.2lbs)
internal battery, called the SL1-320, weighs 1.8kg (3.96lbs)
At just 1.95kg, the SL 1.1 motor weighs (4.3lbs)

I don't recall if the motor can be removed and leave a working drive train.
unfortunately probably not worth the hassle for assisted rides (and taking up my bottle cage!) to save .8kg… but it would be a nice option, since it would save 1.8kg when going without assist. 28lb -> 24lb!
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
unfortunately probably not worth the hassle for assisted rides (and taking up my bottle cage!) to save .8kg… but it would be a nice option, since it would save 1.8kg when going without assist. 28lb -> 24lb!
Honestly, I need the assist on all rides I do. So going without would just not work for this old, overweight guy. (I grabbed quotes and did not do a really fine job of editing those values!!!)
 

AzDave

Member
Region
USA
Honestly, I need the assist on all rides I do. So going without would just not work for this old, overweight guy. (I grabbed quotes and did not do a really fine job of editing those values!!!)
Same for me...generally. I need at least eco mode mostly but just for the fun of maintaining a certain speed. I did ride it with no power here and there and last time I did it was actually enjoyable! That's what is fun about the Creo is a customized workout.
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
i definitely need it too, whenever there are long steep hills involved! i’ve been trying to find some flatter longer routes lately to do more unassisted rides, but that’s a real challenge in the bay area.
 

AzDave

Member
Region
USA
i definitely need it too, whenever there are long steep hills involved! i’ve been trying to find some flatter longer routes lately to do more unassisted rides, but that’s a real challenge in the bay area.
Even with the Creo you need to be pretty fit to do a lot of big hills. Truthfully if I lived around massive hills I probably would have went with the Trek Domane+ HP 7. But for my age and the flats in my environment the Creo is perfect!
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
i definitely need it too, whenever there are long steep hills involved! i’ve been trying to find some flatter longer routes lately to do more unassisted rides, but that’s a real challenge in the bay area.
There's one flat trail that is 25 miles in each direction from home and it can be pretty boring. Part of it follows a slough but so unrelentingly flat - ends at a velodrome. Well, the pavement cracks/heaves can be pretty tedious. It is our esteemed Burke-Gilman trail (BGT) and then the Sammamish Slough trail. It is an old interurban rail corridor. There are a number of road crossings in Seattle but then almost none for 13 miles. I do wonder what kind of battery life I could get there???
 

AzDave

Member
Region
USA
There's one flat trail that is 25 miles in each direction from home and it can be pretty boring. Part of it follows a slough but so unrelentingly flat - ends at a velodrome. Well, the pavement cracks/heaves can be pretty tedious. It is our esteemed Burke-Gilman trail (BGT) and then the Sammamish Slough trail. It is an old interurban rail corridor. There are a number of road crossings in Seattle but then almost none for 13 miles. I do wonder what kind of battery life I could get there???
So do you have a Creo? I find that I get amazing battery longevity on my Creo Expert...probably due to my fitness level, weight (myself and the bike), flats...I even ride it on sport and turbo quite a bit and never seem to worry about my battery level whatsoever. A battery extender would be nice for rare situations but I can't justify the expense of about $450 for something I'd almost never use. I did justify the same money spent though for S Works power with mirror seat. That was a worthwhile extravagant purchase. 😉
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
So do you have a Creo? I find that I get amazing battery longevity on my Creo Expert...probably due to my fitness level, weight (myself and the bike), flats...I even ride it on sport and turbo quite a bit and never seem to worry about my battery level whatsoever. A battery extender would be nice for rare situations but I can't justify the expense of about $450 for something I'd almost never use. I did justify the same money spent though for S Works power with mirror seat. That was a worthwhile extravagant purchase. 😉
Yes but the HEAVY Aluminum version! And then the heavy rider! I seem to range between 2% and 3% battery use per mile on my rides but many have 1,000 feet of climbing or more. On my 53 miler with about 3,000 feet of gain with lots of large and small climbs, I had about 8% left between the Main and Range Extender.

On an experimental battery ride, I set it to use the Range Extender first and got about 16 miles and it just stopped providing power on a long uphill. I had expected it to switch to the Main battery but NO! I had to get off and unplug the RE so that it would keep providing power. I guess that would allow one to use additional RE's without sucking down the main battery. Since the incident, I leave it to use both batteries in parallel.

(as an aside - 3PM and the sun finally shows itself after my gray 15 mile ride.)

PXL_20210817_200931985s.jpg


I spent the first two hours of the morning do this:

PXL_20210817_163536014-.jpg
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
Sun Gold?
Yes but they came easy. The Italian Plums required both a 10 foot orchard ladder and a fruit picker thingie! It might be time for my Cardamom upsidedown Plum coffee cake.

The 20 or so I salvaged from the ground became plum sauce (I remembered Odwalla!!!)
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
So do you have a Creo? I find that I get amazing battery longevity on my Creo Expert...probably due to my fitness level, weight (myself and the bike), flats...I even ride it on sport and turbo quite a bit and never seem to worry about my battery level whatsoever. A battery extender would be nice for rare situations but I can't justify the expense of about $450 for something I'd almost never use. I did justify the same money spent though for S Works power with mirror seat. That was a worthwhile extravagant purchase. 😉
I am considering that saddle. They have been sold out online for a while now. Is it really that plush and comfortable? Not too squishy?