Giant tubeless system experiences

Llama

New Member
Hi folks,

Had a couple of flats recently on my Explore E, which i'm loosing patience with.

In researching on options which to replace the stock crosscut tires with, Im considering going tubeless.

The stock rims are apparently "tubeless ready", but does that mean that I have to go with the "Giant tubeless system"

Has anyone had much experience positive or negative?

Any other advice?
 

David Berry

Well-Known Member
Llama …
I think your tyres are tubeless-compatible. I'm assuming they are Giant Crosscut Gravel 2 (45-622).

All you need do is ask your Giant dealer to remove the tubes and switch the setup to tubeless using the same tyres.

You can do it yourself but note the following:
  • rim tape must be for tubeless tyres;
  • tubeless valves will need to added;
  • you'll need a suitable pump (the sort that has a high pressure reservoir);
  • add plenty of sealant (Stans, Slime or Giant's product);
  • watch how-to videos (Stans is a good place to start).
Now the bad news. Changing your tyres to tubeless will not eliminate punctures through the tyre; however, the sealant should immediately fill the hole. Put differently, approximately the same number of punctures but, hopefully, no flats.

Pinch flats will be a forgotten worry and you might be tempted to run lower pressures.

Always carry a tubeless repair kit containing plugs for determined leaks.
… David
 
Last edited:

Oberst

Active Member
My Trance has been tubeless from day one and, while I carry a tube as well as a plug kit, they have not been used.
 

e-boy

Active Member
Hi folks,

Had a couple of flats recently on my Explore E, which i'm loosing patience with.

In researching on options which to replace the stock crosscut tires with, Im considering going tubeless.

The stock rims are apparently "tubeless ready", but does that mean that I have to go with the "Giant tubeless system"

Has anyone had much experience positive or negative?

Any other advice?
What type terrain are you riding ?
 

Mtl_Biker

Active Member
Hi folks,

Had a couple of flats recently on my Explore E, which i'm loosing patience with.

In researching on options which to replace the stock crosscut tires with, Im considering going tubeless.

The stock rims are apparently "tubeless ready", but does that mean that I have to go with the "Giant tubeless system"

Has anyone had much experience positive or negative?

Any other advice?
You might want to check out my thread about what I went through changing from the stock tube system to tubeless on my E+1 GTS. Mounting Tubeless... Tricks?
 

Llama

New Member
Thanks for the input!
Yes, I would be keen to do it myself, both from a knowledge and cost saving perspective.

Terrain is a mixture of road, and a very rough bitumen path by a creek. Im not sure where they are coming from, but the majority of the punctures that Im getting are from tiny metal splinters.

Thanks for the link Mtl_Biker, Im sorry to admit that I didnt really look too hard for past threads. I'm at work at the moment, but I'll have a read through tonight.

Does anyone have a preference for tire? I get the impression that Im not restricted to Giant tires on the Giant Rims.
 

Mtl_Biker

Active Member
Thanks for the input!
Yes, I would be keen to do it myself, both from a knowledge and cost saving perspective.

Terrain is a mixture of road, and a very rough bitumen path by a creek. Im not sure where they are coming from, but the majority of the punctures that Im getting are from tiny metal splinters.

Thanks for the link Mtl_Biker, Im sorry to admit that I didnt really look too hard for past threads. I'm at work at the moment, but I'll have a read through tonight.

Does anyone have a preference for tire? I get the impression that Im not restricted to Giant tires on the Giant Rims.
No, you're not restricted on tire brand. Which E+ (you didn't say) do you have? If you have one with fenders, you just have to make sure you get a tire that isn't so large that it rubs against the fenders. Also, be aware if you change to a different tire size, the computer will be off for speed and distance, so it's probably a good idea to stick with something the same size or close to it. I'm still running my stock tires (but now tubeless) and I'm fairly pleased. But I'll probably switch to the new Schwalbe Marathon E-Plus tires soon after riding season starts for me again. (Too much snow and ice, salt on the roads and way too cold now.)
 

Saratoga Dave

Well-Known Member
Those little metal splinters are usually from steel belted tires that have met their end out on the road. Highways are terrible for these little devils.

I've been tubeless with Giant Crosscut 700x50 tires all 2019 and had zero problems over 2600 miles or so. Mostly pavement, but plenty of gravel and dirt tracks through the woods as well. I would not consider going back to tubes.
 

e-boy

Active Member
Thanks for the input!
Yes, I would be keen to do it myself, both from a knowledge and cost saving perspective.

Terrain is a mixture of road, and a very rough bitumen path by a creek. Im not sure where they are coming from, but the majority of the punctures that Im getting are from tiny metal splinters.

Thanks for the link Mtl_Biker, Im sorry to admit that I didnt really look too hard for past threads. I'm at work at the moment, but I'll have a read through tonight.

Does anyone have a preference for tire? I get the impression that Im not restricted to Giant tires on the Giant Rims.
I'm running Schwalbe Marathon Almotion 28 x 2.15 tubeless on a 2020 Explore E +4 . A supple stable ride . I'd like to install fenders / mudguards but not sure there's enough room .
 

Mtl_Biker

Active Member
Thanks again everyone.
Looks like I'll make the change. I'll read a few reviews and update the thread with how I get on.

Im not so keen to buy a charger pump, so I might try the method shown by this chap.
The secret to installing tubeless tires with floor pump
I just looked at that video you linked to...

When you give up on that method :) and decide to get a charger pump, take a look at the new one from Giant. I forget the make/model that is always suggested, but the Giant one was half the price. And it works REALLY well.

Also pay particular attention to the rim tape, both which one and how wide it is. I went to the bike tech at MEC (Canadian outdoor gear) and he measured my rim and sold me 19mm rim tape. Turns out it wasn't wide enough. And from the Giant dealer later on, I got "26mm rim tape for 19mm rims" (that's what it said on the label).

Good luck!
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
Personally I like tubes. Super easy to deal with, no mess, conventional pump, no special tools. Bike tires are SO easy to mount and dismount, just need something to lift the first part of the bead over, otherwise no tools required. Frankly, I spend more time fiddling with those stupid presta valves - had one that kept coming out with the inflation adapter so I replaced that tube.

Over thousands of miles on pedal bikes and tens of thousands on motorcycles, I could count flats on less than one hand. For me it's just a non-issue.
I can't really comment on tubeless having never tried them.

But I can tell you the stock tires are very thin. I immediately took them off for Schwalb Marathons which are some of the most puncture-resistant in the industry. Then I wanted balloon tires so I got Big Apples - they've been great. And no flats on those, they have 'race guard' which is about like a layer of nylon fabric. I would make you a steal-deal on the marathons - they have maybe 20 miles on them. Tubes or tubeless. They're 45-47/622's Schwalbe calls them 45's, but due to the puncture layer they run a couple more mm in width. Nice looking tires.

If'n I was plagued with flats I'd be looking for solutions as well.

Marathons...


Explore with the marathons mounted up:

 

Llama

New Member
When you give up on that method :) and decide to get a charger pump, take a look at the new one from Giant. I forget the make/model that is always suggested, but the Giant one was half the price. And it works REALLY well.

Also pay particular attention to the rim tape, both which one and how wide it is. I went to the bike tech at MEC (Canadian outdoor gear) and he measured my rim and sold me 19mm rim tape. Turns out it wasn't wide enough. And from the Giant dealer later on, I got "26mm rim tape for 19mm rims" (that's what it said on the label).

Good luck!
Yah, I'll probably end up going down that path, but I would like to at least try and get to the point where I can be self sufficient if Im away from home.

I saw your experiences with tape in the other thread that you linked to, so will try to avoid undersized tape. Reading around it seems to be that most folk recommend going 5mm above the rim width, but given your challenges and eventual success, I'll probably look at 26mm as I also have 19mm rims.


Good luck with that;)

I tried that method and after a few failed attempts and exhaustion trying to deliver the rapid, high volume of air into the tyre required to snap seal the tyre bead, I gave up and went with this option https://www.bunnings.com.au/ozito-1100w-inflate-it-compressor-kit_p6290649

Works a treat
Thanks, looks like a good option to have around the garage. I'll keep it in mind.

Personally I like tubes. Super easy to deal with, no mess, conventional pump, no special tools. Bike tires are SO easy to mount and dismount, just need something to lift the first part of the bead over, otherwise no tools required. Frankly, I spend more time fiddling with those stupid presta valves - had one that kept coming out with the inflation adapter so I replaced that tube.

....

If'n I was plagued with flats I'd be looking for solutions as well.
I can understand the appeal of the simplicity of tubes and I do admit that I am attracted by the shiny newness of tubeless. It will be interesting to revisit this conversation in another year or so. :)
 
I'm late to the thread, but I just have to weigh in on this discussion as I've thought about this topic a lot. I have a QuickE and a ToughRoad (both 2019) and run them both tubeless from the outset. The QuickE has close to 7500 miles, and I've had a handful of punctures that required the use of plug strips, however, I use them both primarily for food delivery and run on mostly city streets. Pavement, they are, but are full of hazards like gravel, dirt, glass, staples, nails, screws... you name it. As easy as it is to change out a tube under the right conditions, the hassle of laying my thousands of dollars of bike down on the sidewalk and removing a wheel is just not something I'm willing to do. The main benefit I think, for me, is that I can run over the odd nail or staple or glass shard, get a puncture, sealant shoots out of the hole, and in most cases will seal it up without loosing enough air to necessitate immediate inflation. This is a priceless time saver as I make my money out on the road. I do run these at around 40psi for better rolling resistance, which helps. The Schwalbe G-One Allrounds that came on the QuickE had decent puncture resistance and were fast rolling. Those got replaced with the speed version at a 27.5x2.35 that's almost too big for the chain stays, but fit okay. They are super fast and grippy, but do not hold up under the rigors of ebike power and speed. Do not recommend unless you use them casually. My rear tire has many micro cuts in the tread that aren't catastrophic per se, but do allow sealant to weep and I can't run at the pressures I need. Finally settled on a pair of Surly Extra Terrestrial tires that I am eagerly awaiting delivery on. They roll well, have puncture protection, and can survive the mean streets where I work.

I've had many shop techs express their skepticism as to whether or not the rims are tubeless compatible. They are!! Never had a problem seating the bead. I did purchase a Lyzene Overdrive floor pump (w/ canister) so I can properly inflate at home. A bit expensive, but worth the investment if you are going tubeless.

The ToughRoad's gravel cross cut tires have been really reliable tubeless. The extra knobs help grip and dissuade stuff that would puncture. Only about 1500 miles on that bike, but the tires are holding up very well and may just replace with the same when they wear out.

I'm not going to go into how to go tubeless, best go to your lbs if you aren't sure. I will say that it is pretty easy to tape a rim and install valves yourself. I have stan's valves on the QuickE and Muc Off's on the ToughRoad. Impressed with the Muc Off's reliability and they come with a valve core remover as a cap for added bonus in a pinch. I always carry a strip patch kit for the punctures that the sealant won't fix. Once had to put 4 in one hole before it would seal, but once it sealed I have had zero problems. Just remember to slosh the sealant around every couple of months to check the level. I use 3-4 ounces.

Sorry if this was all over the place, but I have a lot of thoughts on this and they don't always come out in order!

Ride fast,

Cheers
 

gorse

Member
I'm late to the thread, but I just have to weigh in on this discussion as I've thought about this topic a lot. I have a QuickE and a ToughRoad (both 2019) and run them both tubeless from the outset. The QuickE has close to 7500 miles, and I've had a handful of punctures that required the use of plug strips, however, I use them both primarily for food delivery and run on mostly city streets. Pavement, they are, but are full of hazards like gravel, dirt, glass, staples, nails, screws... you name it. As easy as it is to change out a tube under the right conditions, the hassle of laying my thousands of dollars of bike down on the sidewalk and removing a wheel is just not something I'm willing to do. The main benefit I think, for me, is that I can run over the odd nail or staple or glass shard, get a puncture, sealant shoots out of the hole, and in most cases will seal it up without loosing enough air to necessitate immediate inflation. This is a priceless time saver as I make my money out on the road. I do run these at around 40psi for better rolling resistance, which helps. The Schwalbe G-One Allrounds that came on the QuickE had decent puncture resistance and were fast rolling. Those got replaced with the speed version at a 27.5x2.35 that's almost too big for the chain stays, but fit okay. They are super fast and grippy, but do not hold up under the rigors of ebike power and speed. Do not recommend unless you use them casually. My rear tire has many micro cuts in the tread that aren't catastrophic per se, but do allow sealant to weep and I can't run at the pressures I need. Finally settled on a pair of Surly Extra Terrestrial tires that I am eagerly awaiting delivery on. They roll well, have puncture protection, and can survive the mean streets where I work.

I've had many shop techs express their skepticism as to whether or not the rims are tubeless compatible. They are!! Never had a problem seating the bead. I did purchase a Lyzene Overdrive floor pump (w/ canister) so I can properly inflate at home. A bit expensive, but worth the investment if you are going tubeless.

The ToughRoad's gravel cross cut tires have been really reliable tubeless. The extra knobs help grip and dissuade stuff that would puncture. Only about 1500 miles on that bike, but the tires are holding up very well and may just replace with the same when they wear out.

I'm not going to go into how to go tubeless, best go to your lbs if you aren't sure. I will say that it is pretty easy to tape a rim and install valves yourself. I have stan's valves on the QuickE and Muc Off's on the ToughRoad. Impressed with the Muc Off's reliability and they come with a valve core remover as a cap for added bonus in a pinch. I always carry a strip patch kit for the punctures that the sealant won't fix. Once had to put 4 in one hole before it would seal, but once it sealed I have had zero problems. Just remember to slosh the sealant around every couple of months to check the level. I use 3-4 ounces.

Sorry if this was all over the place, but I have a lot of thoughts on this and they don't always come out in order!

Ride fast,

Cheers
What size Surly Extra Terrestrial? Must be the 46, as 2.5 won't fit the chainstays...

I got 3000km out of the stock G-One rear tyre before it wore thin & started getting punctures (two in one commute recently, the second not from anything stuck in the casing). I put a Schwalbe Big Ben Plus 2.0 on the rear (wired bead, Greenguard layer version). It's hard and heavy, and only measures 48mm at 40psi. I'd prefer 54mm for ride comfort, but its hard to find something that wide with all the right features.

One issue with the QuickE+ is the direct mount derailleur hanger is poorly cast and slops about in the frame which allows the wheel to shift forward on the RHS, causing a wide tyre to contact the LHS chain stay. Mine is starting to wear through from tyre rub. I checked a standard mount hanger and it has zero movement compared to the direct mount hanger. I'm going to find a B-link and fit the standard hanger.
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
I'm late to the thread, but I just have to weigh in on this discussion as I've thought about this topic a lot. I have a QuickE and a ToughRoad (both 2019) and run them both tubeless from the outset. The QuickE has close to 7500 miles, and I've had a handful of punctures that required the use of plug strips, however, I use them both primarily for food delivery and run on mostly city streets. Pavement, they are, but are full of hazards like gravel, dirt, glass, staples, nails, screws... you name it. As easy as it is to change out a tube under the right conditions, the hassle of laying my thousands of dollars of bike down on the sidewalk and removing a wheel is just not something I'm willing to do. The main benefit I think, for me, is that I can run over the odd nail or staple or glass shard, get a puncture, sealant shoots out of the hole, and in most cases will seal it up without loosing enough air to necessitate immediate inflation. This is a priceless time saver as I make my money out on the road. I do run these at around 40psi for better rolling resistance, which helps. The Schwalbe G-One Allrounds that came on the QuickE had decent puncture resistance and were fast rolling. Those got replaced with the speed version at a 27.5x2.35 that's almost too big for the chain stays, but fit okay. They are super fast and grippy, but do not hold up under the rigors of ebike power and speed. Do not recommend unless you use them casually. My rear tire has many micro cuts in the tread that aren't catastrophic per se, but do allow sealant to weep and I can't run at the pressures I need. Finally settled on a pair of Surly Extra Terrestrial tires that I am eagerly awaiting delivery on. They roll well, have puncture protection, and can survive the mean streets where I work.

I've had many shop techs express their skepticism as to whether or not the rims are tubeless compatible. They are!! Never had a problem seating the bead. I did purchase a Lyzene Overdrive floor pump (w/ canister) so I can properly inflate at home. A bit expensive, but worth the investment if you are going tubeless.

The ToughRoad's gravel cross cut tires have been really reliable tubeless. The extra knobs help grip and dissuade stuff that would puncture. Only about 1500 miles on that bike, but the tires are holding up very well and may just replace with the same when they wear out.

I'm not going to go into how to go tubeless, best go to your lbs if you aren't sure. I will say that it is pretty easy to tape a rim and install valves yourself. I have stan's valves on the QuickE and Muc Off's on the ToughRoad. Impressed with the Muc Off's reliability and they come with a valve core remover as a cap for added bonus in a pinch. I always carry a strip patch kit for the punctures that the sealant won't fix. Once had to put 4 in one hole before it would seal, but once it sealed I have had zero problems. Just remember to slosh the sealant around every couple of months to check the level. I use 3-4 ounces.

Sorry if this was all over the place, but I have a lot of thoughts on this and they don't always come out in order!

Ride fast,

Cheers
I have 2 sets of new stock take-off cross-cut gravel tires at give-away prices. :)
 
What size Surly Extra Terrestrial? Must be the 46, as 2.5 won't fit the chainstays...


One issue with the QuickE+ is the direct mount derailleur hanger is poorly cast and slops about in the frame which allows the wheel to shift forward on the RHS, causing a wide tyre to contact the LHS chain stay. Mine is starting to wear through from tyre rub. I checked a standard mount hanger and it has zero movement compared to the direct mount hanger. I'm going to find a B-link and fit the standard hanger.
Ya, the 46’s. I hope I can deal with the width, but you’re right, not many options, especially for tubeless.

I’ve had the same issue with tire rub. Didn’t know about the hanger.

After having a nail go through the tire and rim and still seal up for weeks, it’s really hard to go back to tubes.

Could you post pics once you switch your hanger out? Very curious.

Thanks!
 

gorse

Member
Ya, the 46’s. I hope I can deal with the width, but you’re right, not many options, especially for tubeless.

I’ve had the same issue with tire rub. Didn’t know about the hanger.

After having a nail go through the tire and rim and still seal up for weeks, it’s really hard to go back to tubes.

Could you post pics once you switch your hanger out? Very curious.

Thanks!
I can do better - here's a vid of the hanger movement: