Good News For Some Utah e-Bikers

George S.

Well-Known Member
No, Park City is fairly close to the vast complex of cities centered around SLC, but in the mountains to the East. It's the home of the Sundance Film Festival and ski areas. Upscale. I'm south, closer to Arizona.

I would venture to say the laws in Utah are a complete mess. The ebike dealers say it's OK to go on the multi-use paths, but the paths are signed "No Motors". There is a guy now, in an ATV, enforcing something, I don't know what. Basically they are bikes except when they aren't bikes, and the power limit is defined by the 1000 watts or 20mph limits.

It's curious about the 14.5 MPH speed limit. I can definitely see where people would go this route, just given the problems with speed on an MUP. They don't mention S-Pedelecs, they mention mopeds. The industry really loves the Pedelec concept, like it makes ebikes just like bikes.

I doubt Utah will follow California, with the 3 categories. They just don't follow California. The mess may remain until ebikes catch on.

People in this online community seem very comfortable with speed and relatively complete access to bike infrastructure. I'm not nearly as optimistic.

The Boulder thing is interesting. Colorado will let you on a bike path, but you can't use the motor. Boulder won't let you on the bike infrastructure with more than a 400 watt motor, I guess. This stuff really could take a nasty turn.

Ebike definition in Colorado follows the HR 727 National Law: 20 mph (30 km/h) e-power and 750 W (1 hp) max, 2 or 3 wheels, pedals that work. Legal low-powered ebikes are allowed on roads and bike lanes, and prohibited from using their motors on bike and pedestrian paths, unless overridden by local ordinance. The city of Boulder is the first to have done so, banning ebikes over 400W from bike lanes. (wikipedia)
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
Colorado will let you on a bike path, but you can't use the motor
Living in Colorado, I am well aware of this law. I like it fine. I even saw a policeman once on a path...I stopped and we spoke for a minute, but before I stopped, a couple pushes on the control pad with my thumb and... no motor!

Needn't have bothered, because he was clueless. But it's nice to know I can basically ride paths wherever I want, because it's like the no-texting & driving law ... unenforceable.
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
Well, Steve, you've admitted the law in your state is "no use of motors on bike paths". You apparently use a motor. If Larry's Way is adopted, you would be an S-1 and gee, now you could ride on a bike path in Colorado, with power.

I will point out that if Larry's Way is adopted, California or anywhere else, the bikes over 20 mph will be at a real disadvantage. The counter to Larry is "Just have a speed limit". That's what I see. I'm no expert, and I'm legal in Utah, where I live, though access to paths is not real clear. The next time I see the enforcement guy on the only path I really ride, I'll ask.

Most of the people on this forum, and almost all on Endless Sphere, are not in that '1' category, under 20 mph.

So your support for Larry seems to bail you out? So what about people who are above 20 mph?
 

Brambor

Well-Known Member
I did realize after first seeing the classifications that my Specialized Turbo would all of a sudden be at disadvantage for riding on MUPS but nevertheless I still agree with the proposed regulations.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
So what about people who are above 20 mph?
Street (including bike lanes).

Too fast for pedestrian-shared paths anyway. (if we are using YOUR speed criteria)

(Now you mention Lycra riders who go 30+ ... and my answer will be that they are breaking the law, and risking the use of the path for all bicyclists as well)
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
If a bike's specs are under the legal limit, whatever that will be (350w,500w,750w) your manufacturer could possibly offer a software update to limit your bike to 20 mph, bringing it inline with the law.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
If a bike's specs are under the legal limit, whatever that will be (350w,500w,750w) your manufacturer could possibly offer a software update to limit your bike to 20 mph, bringing it inline with the law.
Smart, creative idea!
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Sometimes the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few.

The people brewing up their home-built 30+ mph bikes on Endless Sphere (and here) may seem like a lot of people, but they're really a tiny, tiny, miniscule minority of those riding on bike paths.

Their desire to race along paths that we share with pedestrians (or even children, elderly etc on bikes) can't be allowed to ruin it for everyone.

Most of the people on this forum, and almost all on Endless Sphere, are not in that '1' category, under 20 mph