Good Stuff You Bought

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
Today I rode the bike to a discount store opening where there was a free $50 item giveaway that was probably worth $10. Gel comfort wrap. OK.

One of the products I bought, though, was the no-spill Red Copper ceramic-lined coffee mug. It's freaky. when you knock it sideways it won't budge, but it lifts up like normal. Paid $11.88 CAD $8.98 USD for the eventual sure savings and cleaner than plastic lining.
 
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Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
I bought something Thomas recommended, ACF-50, to keep the electrics and electronics clean and protected from water. I also sprayed it on the chain and many metal parts, avoided brake calipers/disks, also used it on paint nicks and scratches.
I bought the spray can rather than a spray bottle type because with the straw you can get it into every place.
 

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Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
These great items are sold out but there still are a couple of nice items in limited size choices still on clearance.



Just received these.
CLEARANCE C$39.99
REG C$99.99


Windproof water resistant and super tough material.

Also their canvas work shirts..$11.59 CAD. Really nice. https://www.dickies.ca/en/men/genuine-dickies-long-sleeve-performance-canvas-work-shirt/GL751.html



The pants are built like $200 reinforced nylon outdoors pants only stronger. They do make a little noise, as they are made of heavy nylon. I've got D30 knee and hip pads to install in pockets I'll sew on. Got all 5 pieces for $19 in an underlayer ski pants clearance. Or might use the pads in a jacket and buy a couple more pieces of D30 knee pads/ elbow pads when on sale
 
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Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
Jones H bars. I've found them to be more comfortable than any I've tried. As a bonus, there is a lot of extra bar space for mounting attachments.

View attachment 58795 View attachment 58794

bars positioning can make the difference for some with hand nerve problems. I never would have suspected that I'd find swept back bars to be my preference, ever. But now they are. Those look even better than what I have.
I'd buy some of those if I had excess dough lying around.
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
Stuff that I've bought recently:


Nice chain cleaner that keeps my chain less grungy.


Nice little brush (better than a toothbrush, surprisingly) to keep stuff less dirty.


Comfy saddle (at least for me).


To keep the saddle rails from slipping.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
My favorite bike buys are bright led lights and contoured grips.

For my daily rides I use and older Magicshine 900lm handlebar light like this one; https://www.ebay.com/itm/VERY-BRIGH...445e93a51c:g:YkMAAOSwn4hfCeW9&redirect=mobile . I use the flash mode during the day to be seen and high mode innthe evenong so i can see. Very bright with a long lasting rechargeable battery pack that uses 4x18560 lithium cells. $11.50 on ebay.

I use an led tail light as well. I use it in flash mode whenever I ride. I've recently upgraded to the Cygolite Hotshot 150 'cause it's good to be seen. Rechargeable. A rack mount bracket is also available. From ~$35; https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cygolite-H...trksid=p2386202.c100677.m4598&redirect=mobile

For grips i use the Ergon Biokork grips with their GP2 bar ends. These have the longer GP3 bar ends; https://www.treefortbikes.com/Ergon-GP3-BioKork-Grips-Bar-Ends . I switched them our for GP2s from a worn our set. A bit pricey at ~$60, but for those of us with carpal tunnel related numbness they're well worth it.
 
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TMH

Well-Known Member
I really like the Ortlieb Velo-Shopper QL 2.1 bags. Bought some of the red ones at Sierra for $70 each, but now price seems to have gone up. Still great bags, with the black ones currently going for $80 each (but watch prices as they change and might go down). Easy to install/adjust, easy on and off, can get them far enough back on my rack to prevent heel strikes, very well made, and make biking to the market a pleasure.

ortlieb-made-in-germany-velo-shopper-ql-21-bike-pannier-in-slate-black~p~894ny_01~1500.2.jpg


https://www.sierra.com/ortlieb-made-in-germany-velo-shopper-ql-21-bike-pannier~p~894ny/?filterString=s~velo-shopper-ql-2dotdot1/

Really like the Sena R1 helmets we bought. A little cumbersome to program pre-set radio stations and such. Just bought some of the R1 Evo CS units which should be more easily programmable through their cell phone app, and have moved the speakers down onto the straps to be closer to the wearer's ears. Plus these come with Sena's visor, and I prefer to have a visor on my helmets. I bought them through Amazon, and they should arrive by the end of the week (the medium should be delivered today).

81ckyz%2BUMfL._AC_SL1500_.jpg

Our favorite mirror. Easy to mount, rock solid during the ride, very effective view. And relatively inexpensive - important since we have lots of bikes and these mirrors are on all of them.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01AVHQB22/
cf-lg-bae877c0-7f87-4bbf-99e0-fbb6c993fb3f.jpg

Garmin Edge 130. I use the current (old) model, and see no need to get the new 'plus' model for my use. Really easy to set up and use. Got mine when BikeTiresDirect had them on sale for $150/free ship. Light, small, yet very easily readable. Many different options for mounting (from Garmin as well as other manufacturers). Fun (but sometimes unpleasant) to see how 'off' your bike's OEM computer is, and necessary for those who may use tuning tools which halve the OEM computer's speed read-out. I've tried more than a few GPS based bike computers, and for general use this one is the best to me.

713AdtHjf6L._AC_SL1500_.jpg

Planet Bike SuperFlash V. Great daylight visibility, long life battery and goes from flash pattern to solid red based on bike velocity change ('brake light'). Picked up some of these through REI for ~$25 each during a sale.

I also like the Bontrager Ion 100 R/Flare R City Bike Light Set. Great day time conspicuity when you want to be seen from the front and back. Small, light, solid build quality, good battery life and reasonable price, better when the Trek Superstore has sales.

BontragerIon100RFlareRCityLightSet_14259_A_Primary
 
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percymon

Active Member
Generic saddle bag - just big enough for a 27.5 inner tube, trye levers, multitool and co2 tyre inflator - perfect and loads of China specials on ebay for under £4 / US$5

s-l1600.jpg


JetValve CO2 inflator - great little tool that (for once) is actually cheap at Halfords ( £10 for those in the UK). I've bought extra 16g canisters via ebay (just to be sure my 2.4 x 27.5 tyres can be inflated from flat)
342582
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
Generic saddle bag - just big enough for a 27.5 inner tube, trye levers, multitool and co2 tyre inflator - perfect and loads of China specials on ebay for under £4 / US$5

s-l1600.jpg


JetValve CO2 inflator - great little tool that (for once) is actually cheap at Halfords ( £10 for those in the UK). I've bought extra 16g canisters via ebay (just to be sure my 2.4 x 27.5 tyres can be inflated from flat)
342582
Hi percymon! I noticed the tyre levers and tube mentioned. I have Slime sealant in the tubes but I wonder if I shouldn't have a back up plan. The CO2 injectors are a good idea either way. I'll be looking to order one.
 
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Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
Hi percymon! I noticed the tyre levers and tube mentioned. I have Slime sealant in the tubes but I wonder if I shouldn't have a back up plan. The CO2 injectors are a good idea either way. I'll be looking to order one.
I'd recommend a flat repair kit, even with sealant in your tubes. I carry a spare tube, tire levers, patch kit, tire boot, mini pump, and CO2 inflator with enough cartridges to fill 2 tires. I don't use sealant in my tubes but do use tire liners that minimize flats. Even with that I had a blow out a few months ago when the tire bead let go and the tube 'popped'. Nothing would have saved that tube! Installed the spare, inflated with the CO2 and off I went.

My sons are avid MTBers. They run tubeless with sealant but even they carry similar flat kits 'cause stuff happens and it can be a long walk back to the trail head, the 'walk of shame' they call it...🤣 Being tubeless they also carry a tire plug kit to fix holes that are just too big for the sealant to take care of.
 

percymon

Active Member
Hi percymon! I noticed the tyre levers and tube mentioned. I have Slime sealant in the tubes but I wonder if I shouldn't have a back up plan. The CO2 injectors are a good idea either way. I'll be looking to order one.

I forgot about the tube patches i also have in there. In reality its all a very tight squeeze, perhaps a 20% bigger bag would have been ideal for me (especially as the tube takes over 50% of the space)
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I'd recommend a flat repair kit, even with sealant in your tubes. I carry a spare tube, tire levers, patch kit, tire boot, mini pump, and CO2 inflator with enough cartridges to fill 2 tires. I don't use sealant in my tubes but do use tire liners that minimize flats. Even with that I had a blow out a few months ago when the tire bead let go and the tube 'popped'. Nothing would have saved that tube! Installed the spare, inflated with the CO2 and off I went.

My sons are avid MTBers. They run tubeless with sealant but even they carry similar flat kits 'cause stuff happens and it can be a long walk back to the trail head, the 'walk of shame' they call it...🤣 Being tubeless they also carry a tire plug kit to fix holes that are just too big for the sealant to take care of.
Tim, tell me.
If I use "puncture-resistant" tyres and a lot of sealant in the inner tubes, what might potentially go wrong? I can remember a single pressure loss in the Marathon E-Plus with "puncture-resistant" Michelin Protek Max inner tube. There was no trace of the puncture! Re-inflating the tube with the mini-pump for three times and riding made the internals of the wheel sealed. I have not taken out the wheel since, even for inspection ("if it's not broken, don't fix it!") I've just added more fresh sealant to the inner tube. What on earth (except a direct long cut) might make the sealant ineffective on my future rides?!
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
Tim, tell me.
If I use "puncture-resistant" tyres and a lot of sealant in the inner tubes, what might potentially go wrong? I can remember a single pressure loss in the Marathon E-Plus with "puncture-resistant" Michelin Protek Max inner tube. There was no trace of the puncture! Re-inflating the tube with the mini-pump for three times and riding made the internals of the wheel sealed. I have not taken out the wheel since, even for inspection ("if it's not broken, don't fix it!") I've just added more fresh sealant to the inner tube. What on earth (except a direct long cut) might make the sealant ineffective on my future rides?!
There's 3 scenarios that you might consider;

1. The tire bead comes loose from the rim resulting in a blowout 'popping' the tube. No amount of sealant can fix this, only a new tube. Happened to me a few months ago. This can be the result of hitting a curb or rock too hard or improperly seating the tire when installing it.

2. You get a tire slash that results in tube damage similar to a blowout. The tube's ruined and the tire is damaged. A new new tube and a tire boot are needed to get back on the trail. Happened to my wife on a popular paved trail last spring. She thinks she ran over a broken stick...

3. You get a puncture that's too big for the sealant to handle. Plug kits can address this for tubeless tires, but not for tubes. This VIDEO demonstrates the plug kit my sons carry.

My flat kit has successfully gotten me back on the trail numerous times for #1 & #2. I don't leave home without it!

My sons tell me that they use their plug kits for their tubeless tires several times a year.