Got my first flat on my Ultimate Commuter Pro

BillyDeeFour

New Member
And, of course, the flat is on the rear tire. Before I attempt to replace the inner tube, are there any tips, trip points, etc. I should be aware of before starting the repair? I’m particularly concerns about reinstalling the wheel and getting the belt tensioned properly. I’ll appreciate any advice any who’s fixed a real flat cares to offer.
 
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mebentz2

New Member
There's always your LBS...

or I've seen a few YouTube videos on using your phone to tension the belt.
 

byunbee

Well-Known Member
How many miles have you put on it when the flat happened? Tires still good and you just need to replace the tube? While you're at it, you may want to install Tannus Armor to minimize future flats.
 

ak907

Member
I have taken it off a couple of times. It's a a bit of a bear, particularly getting it back on as getting everything lined up is a challenge with how heavy the bike is, still wouldn't hire it out, it's a good thing to know how to do. I recommend an assistant or having a stand that allows lowering to the ground of some sort to help.
the biggest thing is getting the torque notch lined up as well as the disc brake. Slipping the belt on and off is not to challenging. When removing wheel move it forward after dropping it to remove the belt. When putting the wheel back on loop the belt over the sprocket and maintain tension while moving it up and to it's home.
Rough steps:
- remove the rohloff shift box using flathead on the thumbscrew/flathead
- note how the flange off the rohloff and the mount mesh on the left hand side just above the box.
- release and losen the quick release to drop the wheel
- move wheel forward to take the belt off the rear sprocket, you may need to lift the frame a good amount to get it out of the way
- do the normal tire change/patch work
get belt on rear sprocket
- bring wheel back and move it into position. Make sure to align the flange off the rohloff and also the rotor of the brake
- tighten quick release
- put rohloff shift box back on
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
Well after reading this I am considering the tannus inserts, even though I rarely ever get flats on any of the bikes- and 90% off road

still makes me nervous and I don’t want to do this out in the middle of nowhere

people with experience please chime in
Thought I read a few places where the handling was affected with those and I really like how my bike handles right now
 

pmcdonald

Well-Known Member
Well after reading this I am considering the tannus inserts, even though I rarely ever get flats on any of the bikes- and 90% off road

still makes me nervous and I don’t want to do this out in the middle of nowhere

people with experience please chime in
Thought I read a few places where the handling was affected with those and I really like how my bike handles right now
Not a WW owner but did shift to Armours recently. I'm very happy with them.

If you run your tubes at lower pressure there's a bit of lateral movement, kind of like running in loose or slightly too large shoes. Apparently it doesn't impact on grip and it's not unpleasant, just a little different. Actually, might improve grip as the effect maximises the tyre surface area in contact with the ground

I run my tubes at about 75psi (Marathon tyres) and don't notice any impact.
 

Luv2ride

Active Member
Well after reading this I am considering the tannus inserts, even though I rarely ever get flats on any of the bikes- and 90% off road

still makes me nervous and I don’t want to do this out in the middle of nowhere

people with experience please chime in
Thought I read a few places where the handling was affected with those and I really like how my bike handles right now
I use Tannus and love them!
My riding is all on good paved roads and I've gone 20,000 miles without a flat!
 

BillyDeeFour

New Member
How many miles have you put on it when the flat happened? Tires still good and you just need to replace the tube? While you're at it, you may want to install Tannus Armor to minimize future flats.
I’ve got 1000 miles on it. The tires look good to me but I know little about how to judge bike tire wear. I’ll know more once I pull the tire off and inspect it.
 

BillyDeeFour

New Member
I have taken it off a couple of times. It's a a bit of a bear, particularly getting it back on as getting everything lined up is a challenge with how heavy the bike is, still wouldn't hire it out, it's a good thing to know how to do. I recommend an assistant or having a stand that allows lowering to the ground of some sort to help.
the biggest thing is getting the torque notch lined up as well as the disc brake. Slipping the belt on and off is not to challenging. When removing wheel move it forward after dropping it to remove the belt. When putting the wheel back on loop the belt over the sprocket and maintain tension while moving it up and to it's home.
Rough steps:
- remove the rohloff shift box using flathead on the thumbscrew/flathead
- note how the flange off the rohloff and the mount mesh on the left hand side just above the box.
- release and losen the quick release to drop the wheel
- move wheel forward to take the belt off the rear sprocket, you may need to lift the frame a good amount to get it out of the way
- do the normal tire change/patch work
get belt on rear sprocket
- bring wheel back and move it into position. Make sure to align the flange off the rohloff and also the rotor of the brake
- tighten quick release
- put rohloff shift box back on
Thanks for the instructions. They are clear but I see lots of steps where I could go wrong, given my skill level. I’m going to let my LBS fix the flat and I’ll ask them about using Tannus inserts. I’m also going to find a class on removing/installing Rohloff wheels. I want to be prepared for the day when there won’t be a LBS to do it for me.
 

byunbee

Well-Known Member
I’ve got 1000 miles on it. The tires look good to me but I know little about how to judge bike tire wear. I’ll know more once I pull the tire off and inspect it.
The tires should last you thousands of miles, so I would assume tire is ok. If you aren't mechanically inclined, you may want to just take it to your local LBS and have then do it for ~$60. Although it's good and fun to learn how to take care of your bikes, it's not for everyone and trying to save a few bucks may not be worth the headache if something doesn't go as expected.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
Well after reading this I am considering the tannus inserts, even though I rarely ever get flats on any of the bikes- and 90% off road

still makes me nervous and I don’t want to do this out in the middle of nowhere

people with experience please chime in
Thought I read a few places where the handling was affected with those and I really like how my bike handles right now
I've ridden about 500 miles on my Allant (no front suspension) with the Tannus liners. At about 42 psi the tires feel very firm on smooth pavement. Rolling over larger bumps and off curbs etc I have been surprised at the nice suspension-effect I feel which I think maybe due to the Tannus liners. So far really pleased with them and the ride quality. Too soon to comment on flat protection. My LBS did the install and they did mention it was a bit of a pain.
 

byunbee

Well-Known Member
I've ridden about 500 miles on my Allant (no front suspension) with the Tannus liners. At about 42 psi the tires feel very firm on smooth pavement. Rolling over larger bumps and off curbs etc I have been surprised at the nice suspension-effect I feel which I think maybe due to the Tannus liners. So far really pleased with them and the ride quality. Too soon to comment on flat protection. My LBS did the install and they did mention it was a bit of a pain.
I've read the same about it being a pain to install correctly.
 

pmcdonald

Well-Known Member
I didn't find them overly difficult to install, given I'm all thumbs and manage to botch most home maintenance tasks up. Baby powder helped, along with inflating, deflating then inflating again. Still, took me about an hour and a half all up for both wheels.
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
Hmm I am running maxxis minion with tubes that say 35 psi on the side and I keep them about 22psi

I don’t know if that is considered low for this tire but it is a lot lower than you guys are listing

Are these mostly used for mtn biking tires or road bikes?
 

AdilDesai

Active Member
Given the weight of these bikes, can anyone recommend a good stand for repairs? I do all my car repairs, so think I could handle the Superbike too. Just can't seem to find a stand that can accommodate 70+ lbs.
 

TomW

Member
Hmm I am running maxxis minion with tubes that say 35 psi on the side and I keep them about 22psi

I don’t know if that is considered low for this tire but it is a lot lower than you guys are listing

Are these mostly used for mtn biking tires or road bikes?
They are talking about Road tyres these tend to be run at higher pressure than Mountain bike tyres,
the minions have a sturdy casing so do not really need to worry to much about flats.
35psi is the max pressure if you are running tubeless,
with a tube the max on minions will be about 55-65psi I run my Minions between 40-50 psi with a tube.
22psi with a tube is to low but it would be fine if you were running tubeless, to be honest I am suprised you are not getting pinch punctures.
I would run minimum 35psi.

Edit,
Earlier I said the 35psi was the max for tubeless, I think i was mistaken. I just looked at my Minions.
On the side of the tyre does it actually say 35-65 psi? if so that is the range of psi that tubed tyres should be run at.
On tubeless you can run as low as 20psi not sure about max.
 
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