Griz Attacks and Kills Bicyclist in Montana

Mulezen

Well-Known Member
Did you hear about the bear last summer that swam from (islands) Whidbey, to Orcas, to San Juan, then back to Orcas, and back to Whidbey? For those not local, that is across a strait where tankers travel, and about 25-30 miles round trip. And the currents are pretty darn strong at times in the San Juan Islands. What was (s)he doing????
Hunting for eBikers…they’re supposed to be lean
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
Did you hear about the bear last summer that swam from (islands) Whidbey, to Orcas, to San Juan, then back to Orcas, and back to Whidbey? For those not local, that is across a strait where tankers travel, and about 25-30 miles round trip. And the currents are pretty darn strong at times in the San Juan Islands. What was (s)he doing????
Bear and deer do frequently swim between the islands. There are also intermediate hops so they don't necessarily have to do it all in one go. From the north end of Whidbey Island direct to Lopez Island it is about four miles open water, but if a bear connected several islands they'd only be crossing about a mile and a half of open water.

I have personally seen deer and bear in quite open water in the Georgia Straight, which is considerably larger than Rosario Straight.
 

Kayakguy

Active Member
Did you hear about the bear last summer that swam from (islands) Whidbey, to Orcas, to San Juan, then back to Orcas, and back to Whidbey? For those not local, that is across a strait where tankers travel, and about 25-30 miles round trip. And the currents are pretty darn strong at times in the San Juan Islands. What was (s)he doing????
Bizarre. From Whidbey to Orcas is many miles, either up Rosario Strait, with strong currents, or San Juan Channel, ditto. Did someone follow him/her, to record this trek? I've never seen one while kayaking (me, not the bear).
 

Luto

Active Member
Bizarre. From Whidbey to Orcas is many miles, either up Rosario Strait, with strong currents, or San Juan Channel, ditto. Did someone follow him/her, to record this trek? I've never seen one while kayaking (me, not the bear).
Bizarre. From Whidbey to Orcas is many miles, either up Rosario Strait, with strong currents, or San Juan Channel, ditto. Did someone follow him/her, to record this trek? I've never seen one while kayaking (me, not the bear).
I think he was tagged by the WDFW. Otherwise how would have there been so many updates. Yeah I have never seen a kayaking bear. :D A bear fishing, yes.

Glad to be off the gun debate though! Only thing I had to outrun today was a deer fly....
 

Dave Rocks

Active Member
Region
Canada
MEALS-ON-WHEELS-TEE.jpg


EBIKER-1-TEE.jpg
 

Elkman

Active Member
1 cyclist killed by a bear as compared to 843 killed by careless motorists in 2019 (an average year). Where should the attention be focused?

Only one successful bear kill by a ranger in Yellowstone in the history of the park and the ranger was experienced and using a rifle and got lucky, very lucky. Hunters kill bears that are standing still and not when they are charging the hunters.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
I've been hit by motorists twice. So far, my Guardian Angel committee is batting a thousand. A bruise, bone bump and burned shin is the worst injury, from a hit & run @ 25 mph. I had 11 seconds left on the "walk" light.
There is an organization that teaches calmness under stress. My draft # was 37 out of 366. My range result was "expert". Fortunately nobody shot at me during my service.
If Montana wants my tourist $ they better manage the grizzleys better. Like ones that visit campgrounds get a death sentence before they kill a camper. My Dad toured Pikes Peak to Glacier National Pk in a '40 chevy with his car salesman brother a few weeks before they enlisted in October 1940. Its my turn now, and with global warming, there won't be a 4000 lb steel car involved.
I've never owned a firearm, only a CO2 BB gun. But there are no grizzlies Mountain Lions or wolves in Indiana. CO to MO there would be both bear spray & something lethal in a holster I could sleep in.
 
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VoltMan99

Well-Known Member
Region
Asia
City
Tokyo
If Montana wants my tourist $ they better manage the grizzleys better. Like ones that visit campgrounds get a death sentence before they kill a camper.
Go to Montana to camp in the wilderness, and one should expect wild things to be about, and to prepare oneself with the knowledge to manage the situation. Those campers broke the first rule that was ever written about camping around bears - no food or cooking or eating in the campsite. Perhaps they should’ve stayed in an Airbnb instead.

I wish grizzlies would come to the park where I ride and clean it up 😁
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Go to Montana to camp in the wilderness, and one should expect wild things to be about, and to prepare oneself with the knowledge to manage the situation.
If Montana can't determine which grizzlies are visiting campgrounds, kill them all. Wolves & mountain lions, too. Lower 48 were safe from wild animals in 1940. Texas was paying bounties on wolves in 1966. I saw the carcasses on a fence west of Houston. Gessner Rd where I rode my bike.
 
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aWanderer

New Member
Region
Canada
We're headed to bear country in a few days.. bought bear spray, bear bangers (and whistles that shoot in the air) and flares... something has to work if time permits.

I've never encountered a bear or have experience with any of the above mentioned items and hopefully don't need it but am still wondering how to prepare. When to use a bear banger, what kind of scenario would you be in where you decide "I should fire a banger/whistle in the air" ?

Flare is for the survivor, to call for help :)
 

VoltMan99

Well-Known Member
Region
Asia
City
Tokyo
We're headed to bear country in a few days.. bought bear spray, bear bangers (and whistles that shoot in the air) and flares... something has to work if time permits.

I've never encountered a bear or have experience with any of the above mentioned items and hopefully don't need it but am still wondering how to prepare. When to use a bear banger, what kind of scenario would you be in where you decide "I should fire a banger/whistle in the air" ?

Flare is for the survivor, to call for help :)
Black bear or Grizzly bear country? Are you camping?
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
We're headed to bear country in a few days.. bought bear spray, bear bangers (and whistles that shoot in the air) and flares... something has to work if time permits.

Jeez.

I've lived and hiked and camped in bear country for decades and have never, ever needed any of that crap. I encounter bears all the time, usually several times each year.

This is basic bear country 101 advice:
  1. If your planned campsite has signs of bear activity, and in particular if you see signs of bear-related mayhem, go somewhere else, preferably several miles away.
  2. Secure all of your food properly. Secure all of your trash along with your food. Secure anything that might smell interesting (e.g. toothpaste, deodorant, sunscreen) along with the food.
  3. Keep a clean camp. And don't burn trash or leftover food -- that will just make the fire pit smell interesting and will also transmit cooked and burnt food smells for literally miles.
  4. Think hard about cooking stinky, odorous foods in places with high bear activity. So you might want to give that barbecue a miss. And even the bacon. (And don't dump bacon grease in the fire pit or the bushes!)
  5. If you are in a campground and your neighbors aren't keeping a clean camp or securing their food properly you are just as vulnerable as they are.
  6. If you are extra paranoid or concerned, consider sleeping some distance from where you are cooking. And leave the clothes you cooked in away from where you sleep.
  7. When hiking or biking, stop in places with very good sight lines where you can see a good distance and where a bear can see you as well.
  8. When hiking or biking, try to make a bit of noise. If you are out with someone else, conversation in a normal voice is enough to give a bear adequate warning.
  9. Be extra careful and aware if you are by yourself.
  10. Be extra extra careful if you are hiking or biking into the wind.
 

aWanderer

New Member
Region
Canada
Jeez.

I've lived and hiked and camped in bear country for decades and have never, ever needed any of that crap. I encounter bears all the time, usually several times each year.

This is basic bear country 101 advice:
  1. If your planned campsite has signs of bear activity, and in particular if you see signs of bear-related mayhem, go somewhere else, preferably several miles away.
  2. Secure all of your food properly. Secure all of your trash along with your food. Secure anything that might smell interesting (e.g. toothpaste, deodorant, sunscreen) along with the food.
  3. Keep a clean camp. And don't burn trash or leftover food -- that will just make the fire pit smell interesting and will also transmit cooked and burnt food smells for literally miles.
  4. Think hard about cooking stinky, odorous foods in places with high bear activity. So you might want to give that barbecue a miss. And even the bacon. (And don't dump bacon grease in the fire pit or the bushes!)
  5. If you are in a campground and your neighbors aren't keeping a clean camp or securing their food properly you are just as vulnerable as they are.
  6. If you are extra paranoid or concerned, consider sleeping some distance from where you are cooking. And leave the clothes you cooked in away from where you sleep.
  7. When hiking or biking, stop in places with very good sight lines where you can see a good distance and where a bear can see you as well.
  8. When hiking or biking, try to make a bit of noise. If you are out with someone else, conversation in a normal voice is enough to give a bear adequate warning.
  9. Be extra careful and aware if you are by yourself.
  10. Be extra extra careful if you are hiking or biking into the wind.

Agree with all that 100%.. good advice.
Keep in mind, we have zero knowledge of biking in an area where bears live. Not paranoid, just doing what we're told. Can't argue with someone if we have no knowledge of the activity.

Sounds like you are saying we don't need any deterrents. We'll probably just wing it and bring the bear spray just in case. If anything, I can use it on the wife if she argues with me :)