Haibike SXDURO RX 29"

Bicyclista

Active Member
New to this electric bike forum, as I am to electric bikes. I have been reading about them and test rode a few. A lot of fun and very exciting bikes!

I rode up Texas Street in San Diego aboard a Faraday S. Tough, long hill on a conventional bike. Relatively easy on the Faraday, a moderate workout. A guy in a truck, who probably thought I did it all on my own, gave me a thumbs up! That'll make you fall in love with electric bikes.

A used Stromer ST-1 from craigslist was underwhelming. The ride quality felt like a department store bike.

At a dealer's I also test rode an IZIP fat bike (slow and lumbering), an Easy Motion 27.5 mountain bike (very nice but not my size), and a bike with Bosch bottom bracket drive (probably the best, smoothest, power assist). Unfortunately, I don't remember which bike it was, but it was probably a Haibike (but not the 29).

I am seriously considering the Haibike SDURo RX 29", specially because it comes in small (40 cm.) size. Yes, size is probably the most important specification! If it doesn't fit you, why would you wear it or ride it?

Any owners of this bike care to share their observations on this bike? I have not been able to test ride it because the dealer does not have it. I have read the enthusastic review on this bike on this site. Seems like a great bike, perhaps the powered version of my Salsa El Mariachi (although mine is steel and the Haibike is aluminum).

Is the Haibaike capable of taking a rear rack? Does anybody know? Thank you in advance!
 

Steve Ryu

Member
New to this electric bike forum, as I am to electric bikes. I have been reading about them and test rode a few. A lot of fun and very exciting bikes!

I rode up Texas Street in San Diego aboard a Faraday S. Tough, long hill on a conventional bike. Relatively easy on the Faraday, a moderate workout. A guy in a truck, who probably thought I did it all on my own, gave me a thumbs up! That'll make you fall in love with electric bikes.

A used Stromer ST-1 from craigslist was underwhelming. The ride quality felt like a department store bike.

At a dealer's I also test rode an IZIP fat bike (slow and lumbering), an Easy Motion 27.5 mountain bike (very nice but not my size), and a bike with Bosch bottom bracket drive (probably the best, smoothest, power assist). Unfortunately, I don't remember which bike it was, but it was probably a Haibike (but not the 29).

I am seriously considering the Haibike SDURo RX 29", specially because it comes in small (40 cm.) size. Yes, size is probably the most important specification! If it doesn't fit you, why would you wear it or ride it?

Any owners of this bike care to share their observations on this bike? I have not been able to test ride it because the dealer does not have it. I have read the enthusastic review on this bike on this site. Seems like a great bike, perhaps the powered version of my Salsa El Mariachi (although mine is steel and the Haibike is aluminum).

Is the Haibaike capable of taking a rear rack? Does anybody know? Thank you in advance!
Unfortunately the SDURO's are not released for sale yet in North America and are barely being announced at Interbike. If you are looking at any of the Haibike Mountain designated bikes (non-trekking), these will not support any racks other than a seatpost rack. Most of the Full Suspension Haibikes use a horst link suspension system leaving no room rack mounting support.

If you felt the IZIP Sumo was slow, try the Peak. The Currie motors although less smoother than Bosch have a little more power and torque.

On a side note, if you are looking for a bike in the 40cm range, Lapierre has 39cm Overvolts that use the same Bosch system as well and the Raleigh Misceo iE which uses a Shimano motor that comes in a similar size. I'm located in Santa Monica, but let me know if you need some help being pointed in a direction of a dealer that has those.
 

Bicyclista

Active Member
Unfortunately the SDURO's are not released for sale yet in North America and are barely being announced at Interbike. If you are looking at any of the Haibike Mountain designated bikes (non-trekking), these will not support any racks other than a seatpost rack. Most of the Full Suspension Haibikes use a horst link suspension system leaving no room rack mounting support.

If you felt the IZIP Sumo was slow, try the Peak. The Currie motors although less smoother than Bosch have a little more power and torque.

On a side note, if you are looking for a bike in the 40cm range, Lapierre has 39cm Overvolts that use the same Bosch system as well and the Raleigh Misceo iE which uses a Shimano motor that comes in a similar size. I'm located in Santa Monica, but let me know if you need some help being pointed in a direction of a dealer that has those.
Thank you for your reply.

I am going to try the Peak. Just waiting for my local dealer to get one. It would be the bike I am looking for except for the fact that it does not come in a small size. Riding the medium size is not a problem. The problem may occur when I am stopped at a red light and I have to get off the saddle—if you know what I mean. But the Peak does have bosses for a rack, so it could double as an everyday bike as well as a mountain bike.

The reality is that I probably need two bikes, a mountain bike and a city bike. I own two road bikes (a Schwinn Paramount and a Bill Holland) and a mountain bike (Salsa El Mariachi). precisely because there are no bikes that can do everything.

Thank you for the heads-up on the Lapierre Overvolt and the Raleigh Misceo iE. I will look into these.
 

rocky289

Member
I realize this thread is now 5 months old but I have recently bought a couple of Haibike SDURO FullNine bikes.
If anyone has any queeries.
 

rocky289

Member
I'm not very good at composing reviews, but I'm happy to answer any question you may have.
So far I'm loving it.
I ride local tracks & a little on road for exercise.
I've moved from a normal/standard 26'' full suspension mtb to one of these.
The old legs were starting to protest on the uphill bits.
I'm able to travel further now without worrying about getting home knackered.
Bought the second one for my wife.
The RC model retails at just under 7k in NZ
 

rocky289

Member
No, never had the opportunity.
I would like to know what they were like to ride with the power off.
That small front drive must have to turn faster than the crank.
 

eoghan

Member
I have ridden both the Xduro and Sduro models and was pleasantly surprised how similar they were on a flat surface, did not have a chance to climb any hills on the Yamaha where the Bosch does very well. The Yamaha samples your peddling at a lower rate so it will take off at a faster rate when you first start peeling, the Bosch is far smother, some may prefer one over the other. The higher end Sduro models have two gears around the front peddle which of course the Bosch don't support. The yamaha battery is very long almost touches the crossbar which meant it would not fit on my car rack without using a clip on bar which I disliked. Both were very similar to ride with the power off (again on a flat road), surprisingly easy, I was expecting more drag.
 
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rocky289

Member
That's good info. I wondered how they compared.
I ride mainly on tracks & there are some steep pinches on some of them.
I've given mine a fare workout.
I'll say this, the Yamaha will climb anywhere I am prepared to go.
I tried one slope that was a bit much & chickened out when the front wheel lifted.
It will provide more power if you keep the revs/cadence up to 60 or more.
If it's a straight climb I just use the STD mode.
If it's bumpy or twisty, I use High in case I don't get into the correct gear or have to slow to get balance.
The 2016 model has the front derailleur & 2 drive sprockets.
The larger has 44T opposed to the previous models 42T
The rear cassette is the same 11-36
The power assist is limited to 25k's or about 16 mph
Beyond that you are the engine.
Found a few things, I think could be improved.
1/ The button for the walk function is hard to use.
2/ Charging port is positioned in a area where the connection could easily be damaged by turning the crank.
3/ A gear position indicator would be handy.
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
electric bike action magazine has a Yamaha - Bosch showdown in their latest issue. Gorgeous Piaggio Wi-Bike on the cover. (April issue)
 

Garrick K

New Member
Thanks for posting that. I downloaded the Electric Bike Action Magazine app and bought/downloaded the latest magazine for $2.99. I recently ordered a 2016 Xduro having only ridden a 2016 Sduro briefly, and a 2015 Felt NineE quite a bit.

I don't want to spoil anything, as I think this magazine deserves lots of support. But I'll post a little.

Basically, they love both. The Yamaha's range of assist sounds like it is smoother, and more "bike like", climbs great, but doesn't feel as powerful in some scenarios. They used the higher power modes more often. Also, the Yamaha seems to lose power and assist if you reach higher pedal RPMs. That sort of contradicts the notion of "smoother" to an extent.

The Bosch CX system they say felt more powerful and engaged well throughout cadence range, but it doesn't have the option of a 2nd chain ring up front, so finding the ideal gear was harder (well, with respect to ideal cadence).

Yamaha buttons were smaller and a little harder to hit, but it seems they felt they might be more durable.

The final conclusion sounds like a wash, but they tipped Bosch. For effectively a $1,000 difference, I'm not sure how they chose the Bosch over the Yamaha, but they both react and climb wonderfully. And saying the Yamaha felt more "bike like" seems like a ringing endorsement.

Sounds like the Bosch feels more powerful, always is engaged over a wide pedal range (except close to 0 like the Yamaha), but the power may feel like is kicks in a little unevenly. The Yamaha is just smoothly kicking in all the time, unless you get your cadence up too high, it which case, you should just shift.

No wrong decision. I mostly leaned toward Bosch because more info online, hoping (guessing) for better reliability, I knew that dongles out there exist that can give me more speed and accurate MPH, and I loved the Felt NineE.
 

rocky289

Member
Having done about 700k on Yamaha SDURO I would have to disagree with,

"Yamaha seems to lose power and assist if you reach higher pedal RPMs.

I have found the opposite applies.
Going up a hill you need 60 rpm or more to get the best out of it.


I
 

Garrick K

New Member
Having done about 700k on Yamaha SDURO I would have to disagree with,

"Yamaha seems to lose power and assist if you reach higher pedal RPMs.

I have found the opposite applies.
Going up a hill you need 60 rpm or more to get the best out of it.


I
I wonder how much this comes down to settings as chosen by the manufacturer of the bike, in how they setup the firmware on a particular model.

For instance, on a Bafang, in the firmware, you can tweak all sorts of low level settings, from ramp rate, cadence cut out, delay values, etc. I'm sure Yamaha and Bosch have a lot of tweaks that Haibike, Felt, etc. can make depending on the bike weight, gear setup, and more.

The Sduro they rode had 2 chain rings in the front. They might have programmed the firmware to cut back on current additions after a certain point to encourage efficient gear selection. And these new Yamaha "PW-series system", have "zero cadence" power, or power sooner than previous model years at least. Maybe the tweaks across the board are different. Or, these motors are thermally limited and can surge in power until they get warmed up and cut back. It's possible they reviewers were riding hard and the Yamaha needed to cut back to cool down.

Perhaps also Haibike lowered upper cadence power in the tuning to make the more expense Bosch feel better in this one regard. But re-reading the article, my impression would be to go with the smoother and more "bike like" Yamaha. In any case, the article is feedback from riders that were switching back and forth between the two models and just trying to compare them directly.

The magazine is interesting and I suggest people support it.

Garrick
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
[QUOTE="

The final conclusion sounds like a wash, but they tipped Bosch. For effectively a $1,000 difference, I'm not sure how they chose the Bosch over the Yamaha, but they both react and climb wonderfully.
/QUOTE]

The Bosch equipped bike had better suspension and maybe brakes. I think that tilted it as much as anything about the motor.
Can't imagine a more bike like experience than my Bosch setup, I think it's likely they are a whole lot more the same than they are different. :)
 

MarcusLXVI

New Member
Hi , I tried both the bosh and yamaha system on a haibike and i preferred the the yamaha. I thought the motor was quieter than the bosh and the assist from start up kicked in better. Also herd reports that since the bosh has a small front sprocket it can sometimes sometimes pick up the chain if it gets covered in to much dirt, didn't have that problem myself but you can never say never. I think you have to try before you buy both systems because its what suits your style of riding which will prob determinewhat system feels th best for you. I just cycle to work and back which is 20miles 2/3 on track 1/3 on the road. had my bike a week done a hundred miles so far and alls well.Also found the yamaha display to be less bulky so alot easier for me to fit in pocket when taken off.
 

MarcusLXVI

New Member
Hi Marcus
What model did you get?
I got the basic model which was the Hardseven (2016) as its just to get me to work and back, also installed bikespeed-rs to derestrict the assist which works well. Also alot cheaper than the Bosh system as it is only a work bike.
 
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