Haibike Trekking RX or Stromer ST1 Platinum

Ron

New Member
I have posted the same thread on the Q&A section, but since no one has responded, I am also posting it in this section.

I would like to get a PAS e-bike. I have a 12 mile round-trip commute. E-bikes with the Bosch motor would be my preference, since I am hopping to lose a couple of pounds.

The Haibike Trekking RX would be my first choice and the Stromer ST1 Elite my second. I live in Cincinnati, OH and the local bike shop here only sells Stromer. I would have to drive to Chicago (or to Crazy Lenny’s in Madison, WI) to test ride the Haibike and have it shipped to me since I have a small car or I can purchase it online. I am also open to other brands as long as they are reliable.

I would like to get your suggestions, since I know both e-bikes are good. I would also appreciate if you can recommend where to buy the Haibike online in case I decide to buy it.

Thanks!
 

Shea N Encinitas

Active Member
I dig my Haibike, hydro brakes, stiff frame et all. Seems to me even the smallest of cars could haul a partially disassembled bike. Pull the wheels, loosen the head tube, take it to a local bike shop for re-assembly if required. Stromer makes nice bikes too but I prefer the suspension and construction of the Haibikes. Test drives are pretty important to see how your body fits. As a side note, I believe one can ride 200 miles a week and not lose much weight IF they continue to drink sweet drinks and consume animal fats etc. Riding can cause strong cravings and it is best to answer those cravings with smart nutritional choices. Good luck in all aspects! -S
 

Michel

New Member
I am doing the same reflexion. I am considering the OHM XU-700-16 vs the Haibike Trekking RX. The OHM bike has a gearless 500W rear hub motor. I am waiting Curt review on this 2015 model.
We are on the same boat.
Michel
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
http://electricbikereview.com/ohm/urban-xu700/

Court reviewed the 2014. How has it changed?



I don't know how you gauge when people really need different features. Mid-drive is best when you are climbing steep hills, but it's mostly a trail thing. You end up weighing lower Euro standard motors with mid drive versus high power hubs for the US market (The Euro stuff is generally somewhat upgraded for the US market.) Everything is a mix of drive train, battery capacity, motor power, etc, and there are a tremendous number of choices.

If someone has never ridden an ebike and says they want xxx.xx, it's possibly because of marketing. Which is fine. It would make sense to ride bikes, look at prices, see how the game is played at the marketing and dealer level. It's like a voyage of discovery, or something.

I think the Cincy shop lists A2B. They were bought by Hero. Hero is a huge Indian motorcycle company. The motorcycles are coming to the US in a year or two. They sponsor the Tiger Woods golf event, which costs them millions. The ebikes are interesting. It's hilly there, but not SF stuff? Reliability is tough. They all have some problems. Local dealers are great for adjustments.

It's a pretty short commute. If you took a fairly basic ebike, something around $2000 to $2500, what do you think the difference would be, versus the fairly pricey Haibike? All ebikes basically push you along at a higher speed, if the conditions allow that. If you take the stuff the Mayo Clinic puts out, a cardio workout can be 90 minutes/week at an 85% of max heart rate, or 150 minutes a week at around a 70%. If you translate from motors to people, you need to be outputting maybe 100 watts to get a decent HR. But you could do either fitness strategy with your commute. It might be determining where to set the pedal assist. Weight loss? Who knows. Bikes are about fitness.

Fact is, if you pedal enough to get your heart going somewhat, what's left for the bike is mostly wind and hills, and you won't need all that much power or efficiency. Just try to get the big picture in your mind. What are you and the bike actually doing for maybe 45 minutes a day. And then just find a bike that works.
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
Kudos, Ron for going the ebike route! Digging through a short Google search of bike shops in Cincinnati yielded several that mentioned ebikes (generally under the 'other' bike category ;) ) as part of their product line. Websites can lag behind what's actually available at a particular store, so a quick phone call to a shop's service manager will help you know which ones provide service & technical support for an ebike. That's essential to a successful transition to ebike commuting.

One sneaky thing that all of these workout gurus don't really emphasize is that it is consistency in exercise and not just intensity that yields the long term benefits of better health and weight. Maybe some tweaking of one's sugar consumption, too is beneficial.

Most brands of ebikes, whether the mid drive variety like the Haibike/Felt/EasyMotion, or hub motor varieties like Currie's Izip line or the Stromers offer some type of pedal assist system (including a couple of the newest 2015 ProdecoTech Bikes) which might be what you're really looking for rather than just a brand or motor style. Of course there's nothing wrong with riding the coolest thing on 2 wheels! If you don't want a throttle, then just ignore it rather than limit your selection of ebikes. Having the option to select different levels of pedal assist will help you tailor your ride to be more or less of a workout so you keep riding regularly. I do suggest test riding bikes that have different types of pedal assist; the cadence/crank arm based systems feel and react differently than ebikes with a true torque sensor system.

Besides the electronics, motor and lithium battery, the rest of the cost of an ebike comes from the caliber of components used and the quality of the frame which translates into longterm durability and performance. I've ridden all of the above mentioned ebikes and they each have their pluses; some like the Xduro Haibike really are more of an off-road machine. Pick one that makes you feel good to get on it every day, not a hassle to use or clunky feeling for you...that's the right bike.
 

lilrich1959

Member
I'm a tech guy at heart but have to agree with Shea and George, seat of the pants is the best tool to find the right bike for you. I like to compare it to sex in a way, I can know all the fact, hear all the reviews but until you experience it you have no idea what riding an ebike is about. A lot of people always look to the latest and greatest and sometimes a plain old econobox is what suits them best. Most bikes on the market will get reasonable range and handle the terrain and conditions that most users will need. Fit and feel are subjective. Court does wonderful reviews and has helped many people narrow the field but the final choice usually is made by trying it out for yourself. I have always encouraged people to test ride a bike if at all possible, and that is especially true for anyone who has never experienced an ebike. Recently I was dealing with someone convinced that any ebike that could not do at least 35mph on its own would not be enough for him. After a quick test ride, and a ear to ear grin coming back, he decided that the currently regulated machines were plenty mature enough technically, and thrilling enough to take up room in his garage. Do your research, but be your own judge too and remember to enjoy the ride...peace
 

LouisQ

Member
I found the idea solution for me after trying a score of I'll fitting EBikes that a custom build on a frame that was an ideal fit was the best route. Several here have had their favored bike converted. I used a $450 crank forward town is style with an $1100 kit that could be installed for $200-300. Depending on the shop. The battery is from a well know builder and of first quality high powered cells. A mid drive conversion can be the perfect route if you have a bike you really like and fits you well. I did a mild front drive, less than ideal, but pretty inexpensive. The older fellow is thrilled. It's on his favorite bike was easy to do, and something a shop can do, and do reasonably. Unless you live near me. No EBike willing shop for 120miles.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
I am doing the same reflexion. I am considering the OHM XU-700-16 vs the Haibike Trekking RX. The OHM bike has a gearless 500W rear hub motor. I am waiting Curt review on this 2015 model.
We are on the same boat.
Michel

Agree.
OHM XU-700-16 with Bionx-D series motor is a solid performer. For those who are looking for a serious commuter, this could be a great option. I spent half hour on this bike at the Interbike 2014 and really liked it.
Advantages over Haibike Xduro Rx or Stromer ST1 Platinum.

48V vs 36V
28mph as opposed to 20mph (ST1 platinum does reach 28mph)
576Wh battery compared to 400Wh Bosch powerpack or 522 in ST1 patinum
Stronger regen in the D series motor. (absent in Bosch system)
Warranty - OHM ( 3 years) - Bosch (2 years) - Stromer (3 years)
 
Last edited:

Michel

New Member
I can't wait to see the review on 2015 Ohm-700-16. I realize than a test ride is the best to help choosing a 3 thousands dollars and plus bike. But sometimes, reviews are all we have to make the best decision. Bionx system is widely available. Any comments about reliability, durability and service for this bike compare to the Haibike Rx Trekking.
 

Lenny

Well-Known Member
I can't wait to see the review on 2015 Ohm-700-16. I realize than a test ride is the best to help choosing a 3 thousands dollars and plus bike. But sometimes, reviews are all we have to make the best decision. Bionx system is widely available. Any comments about reliability, durability and service for this bike compare to the Haibike Rx Trekking.

Both OHM and Haibike have proprietary motor systems. And both of them have entered US market in the recent past.
We have couple of XS 750 Ebikes with D series motor in our store and in terms of handling and power, it has exceeded our expectations.