Hand signals for turning

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Assuming you are comfortable riding one handed, do you understand the correct signal to use? I thought I did until I googled the subject. Depending on where you ride, the signals can be different. It's one thing for us cyclists to use these signals but how may motorists are familiar with them? Some can be confusing, especially for a motorist approaching head on.

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For example, the bent left elbow signal for a right turn can easily be confused with the "stopping" signal, a wave to a friend or a "thank you" gesture. The same is true for the bent right elbow signal for a left turn.

The signal for "slowing" can also be confused with a lane change.
 

damonjohn

Active Member
So it's just...

f = b · sin θ · cos θ

But of course. I knew that. I was just checking to see if you guys did. :)
 

dknightd

Member
Assuming you are comfortable riding one handed, do you understand the correct signal to use? I thought I did until I googled the subject. Depending on where you ride, the signals can be different. It's one thing for us cyclists to use these signals but how may motorists are familiar with them? Some can be confusing, especially for a motorist approaching head on.

View attachment 39935 View attachment 39936 View attachment 39937 View attachment 39938

For example, the bent left elbow signal for a right turn can easily be confused with the "stopping" signal, a wave to a friend or a "thank you" gesture. The same is true for the bent right elbow signal for a left turn.

The signal for "slowing" can also be confused with a lane change.
The only signals I have used is left arm out for left turn. Left arm out and bent for right turn. I'm mostly concerned about signaling to motorists. Perhaps most of them understand none of them. So I'm wasting my time and concern. I have never ridden with a group of bikes. I assume they have their own signals. I signal with left arm so I can brake with right hand (rear brake) if I need to slow down.
I mostly want to signal to motorists that I want to turn left, or merge left. Perhaps a quick wave of the left hand is all I need??? I like to think most drivers understand when my left arm is out, I intend to go left. Perhaps sticking my left arm out, and having the bike wiggle around, makes them more cautious ;)
 

dknightd

Member
Part of the reason I quit riding a bike much is because I did not trust motorists. I thought about dragging a trailer around, just so they thought there might be a baby in it. . . Maybe a fake baby trailer, with lots of lights, could be a partial solution. Probably safer to not ride a bike on public roads :(

Edit: it might just make me a bigger target for somebody not paying attention to hit.
Edit2: I could use it for a spare battery, and groceries
 
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Tars Tarkas

Active Member
I too mostly just use left arm signals for left and right turns. They are pretty intuitive, but who knows what anybody knows anymore. Interestingly, to me anyway, is that hardly any motorists use turn signals, or they turn them on as they are making the turn. I haven't done a rigorous, scientific survey, but informally, as I'm driving, I notice that of, say, 11 cars waiting at a stoplight where they have to turn left or right (straight isn't an option), 2 or 3 of them will use their turn signals.

Point being, if you use hand signals on your bike, motorists may think you're spastic or having some kind of fit.

I still think turn signals, hand or automotive, are a valuable safety factor and I use them. I also try to get way over to the right or left so people might intuit what I'm about to do.

TT
 

dknightd

Member
Point being, if you use hand signals on your bike, motorists may think you're spastic or having some kind of fit.

I still think turn signals, hand or automotive, are a valuable safety factor and I use them. I also try to get way over to the right or left so people might intuit what I'm about to do.

TT
Perhaps appearing spastic is a good thing? I always give wide berth to spastic ships/people/bikes.
 
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dknightd

Member
I haven't done a rigorous, scientific survey, but informally, as I'm driving, I notice that of, say, 11 cars waiting at a stoplight where they have to turn left or right (straight isn't an option), 2 or 3 of them will use their turn signals.
I think the assumption is once you are in the left turn lane, you plan to turn left;)

All it takes is one bozo to kill me. I'd like to avoid that
 

PrimalDoc

New Member
I've found using hand signals with this thing is difficult.
It is my first e-bike.
Letting go of the handle bar while signalling a turn is scary.
I do not know if that is because of the small wheels, or different caster, or electric motor.
Perhaps all of the above. Thoughts?
Has anybody been brave enough to ride it with no hands on handle bar?
The very steep/vertical head tube angle, combined with the small wheel size, leads to fairly 'squirrely' steering, compared to most other styles of bike. I'm getting more used to it.
 

PaD

Well-Known Member
Anyone try these? They also project a lazer line at night. Thoughts?
i bought a similar light. $30 at Wallyworld. $4 on Aliexpress. Maybe the politicians will fix the tariffs soon!
Can I get with small buttons or touch control on my brake levers to operate with index fingers? :)
 

Handlebars

Active Member
Assuming you are comfortable riding one handed, do you understand the correct signal to use? I thought I did until I googled the subject. Depending on where you ride, the signals can be different. It's one thing for us cyclists to use these signals but how may motorists are familiar with them? Some can be confusing, especially for a motorist approaching head on.

View attachment 39935 View attachment 39936 View attachment 39937 View attachment 39938

For example, the bent left elbow signal for a right turn can easily be confused with the "stopping" signal, a wave to a friend or a "thank you" gesture. The same is true for the bent right elbow signal for a left turn.

The signal for "slowing" can also be confused with a lane change.
Very often when I use the left-handed right turn signal people "wave back" at me. People here don't know about old-fashioned hand signals.
 

Handlebars

Active Member
I've found using hand signals with this thing is difficult.
It is my first e-bike.
Letting go of the handle bar while signalling a turn is scary.
I do not know if that is because of the small wheels, or different caster, or electric motor.
Perhaps all of the above. Thoughts?
Has anybody been brave enough to ride it with no hands on handle bar?
I can ride with one hand or ride with no hands no problem on an a-bike. I've had to adapt to e-bike though, because it is different...the difference is the motor kicking in or sudden slowdown when motor stops pushing, especially when in a turn. I do all my signaling well before the turn and have both hands back on the bars for the turn.
 

Handlebars

Active Member
I saw someone doing a turn signal by hand the other day and it was noteworthy...it's a rare thing ... and I hardly ever use the stop signal myself. I'm gonna get me an electric turn signal.
I wonder what viewing this one is like when in strong sunlight? Night-time is fine to show, but what about day?


 

Handlebars

Active Member
here's another one...I like the lasers making lane lines on the road but I like the arrow pointers much better than the directional "movement" pointers this one has


just looked at the Amazon price

this one looks like it's too weak


different kind with lasers. I like this type of remote, the light might be weak though

I like this one
 
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