Handy Dandy Reference for E-Bike Laws for each state

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Traveling this year with your new ebike to other states ? Want to know quickly, which 25 have the 3-tiered ebike classification system ? Or which wants don't ? Or which ones actually define what an ebike is ? Or which of the states still live in the dark ages, and don't define an ebike whatsoever ?

Well here is your go-to link before you hit the open road, either in your RV, your SUV, or MAYBE just actually go across state lines on your EBIKE ONLY sans any other vehicle :p ....

https://www.ncsl.org/research/transportation/state-electric-bicycle-laws-a-legislative-primer.aspx
 

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6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
A handy reference to be sure. Thanks for posting.

The problem with these references is they are not updated often enough. The posted date for this site is 8/25/20 and e-bike laws are changing from week to week.

PeopleForBikes also maintains a site listing state by state e-bike laws:


It isn't updated often enough either but it might be a good idea to check more than one source before travelling.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Regarding "sticky" status, I think things are changing too quickly for an article like that to be the last word on what's going on.

For instance, there's no mention that a Florida law became effective just this year, that recognizes the 3 bike classes, but allows all 3 to go anywhere a bicycle can go.
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
As a score board for how things are going in getting the model ebike legislation passed it's fine, but as others have written, the local interpretation still is what counts, which is why New York is able to claim this year they adopted the 3-class ebike law but a clause inserted bans ebikes from riding on roads with speeds >30mph, with a different Class 3 top speed (25mph instead of the default 28mph), and with local trail ordinances banning ebikes - from the Hudson River Greenway for example. It's frustrating.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Traveling this year with your new ebike to other states ? Want to know quickly, which 25 have the 3-tiered ebike classification system ? Or which wants don't ? Or which ones actually define what an ebike is ? Or which of the states still live in the dark ages, and don't define an ebike whatsoever ?

Well here is your go-to link before you hit the open road, either in your RV, your SUV, or MAYBE just actually go across state lines on your EBIKE ONLY sans any other vehicle :p ....

https://www.ncsl.org/research/transportation/state-electric-bicycle-laws-a-legislative-primer.aspx
Thanks. Looking up individual states was going to be an issue on the road ... actually.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Traveling this year with your new ebike to other states ? Want to know quickly, which 25 have the 3-tiered ebike classification system ? Or which wants don't ? Or which ones actually define what an ebike is ? Or which of the states still live in the dark ages, and don't define an ebike whatsoever ?

Well here is your go-to link before you hit the open road, either in your RV, your SUV, or MAYBE just actually go across state lines on your EBIKE ONLY sans any other vehicle :p ....

https://www.ncsl.org/research/transportation/state-electric-bicycle-laws-a-legislative-primer.aspx

Good information... thanks for sharing.

Three-Tiered E-Bike Classification System
Twenty-six states (Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming) have created a three-tiered e-bike classification system intended to differentiate between models with varying speed capabilities. These states have almost identical defining language for e-bikes, as well as similar safety and operation requirements.

New Jersey and West Virginia both established a two-tiered classification system. In New Jersey’s case, the definition only includes the first two tiers of classification. The legislature then modified its “motorized bicycles” definition by stating that such device is one that operates in excess of 20 MPH with a maximum motor-powered speed of 28 MPH. This would generally meet the definition of a “class three” e-bike. In West Virginia, the law provides for “class one” and “class three” e-bikes, but not the “class two” classification e-bike that can be propelled solely by a motor up to 20 MPH.

Class 1 electric bicycleA bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour.
Class 2 electric bicycleA bicycle equipped with a motor that may be used exclusively to propel the bicycle, and that is not capable of providing assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour.
Class 3 electric bicycleA bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 28 miles per hour and is equipped with a speedometer.