Hello from Jaime and GiGi Gazelle

Jmedvm

New Member
Region
USA
City
Mesa, Arizona
5E6D2E46-3B42-4EE4-9E24-7E2ABCBE9424.jpeg

Hi!
Hello from Arizona!
I am thrilled to have found my new-to-me used 2017 Gazelle NL C7 bike! I am braving the 100-116 F degree weather to get the ergometrics and baskets etc worked out to really try to replace my car as much as possible!
I am an older (63) former endurance triathlete, worked in bike stores and raced for many years. I spent many years trying to keep my bikes as LIGHT as possible …my road bike is like 17 lbs!?
so this 60 lb behemoth , upright posture is like another universe and takes getting used to.
I have been in denial my wonderful road bike (Specialized carbon Roubaix) is uncomfortable for me. I have neck issues and no matter what I do it hurts. So here I am.
I can not believe the feeling of pedaling easily and yet going FAST! It kind of reminds me of ice skating compared to running! A little effort has you speeding away!
I read an interesting article about how , contrary to common sense, that people generally burn MORE calories on ebikes because it feels so easy…and so they ride more often and longer.
I can see why now, I doubt I would even attempt to ride much here in the summer where it can still be over 90 in the early AM.
I am going to now go over to ask some specific questions but so glad to be here!
Cheers,
Jaime

PS:https://theconversation.com/cycling...tric-cars-for-reaching-net-zero-cities-157163
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Welcome to the site and the electric side of the hobby.
I grew up in Houston and found air conditioning the house less made me more used to the heat. Some A/C is necessary to keep the furniture from molding. I unloaded trailers at 100 deg & 100% humidity with no fan in my college summers. I also drank over a gallon a day, most of it water. Riding I wear long sleeve long pants dickies whatever the weather, to limit sunburn & road rash. Red Hat makes a 100% cotton mechanic's weight long sleeve tunic for July days. I wear $1 cotton/poly gloves too to keep the hand burn down. Last 25 mph fall, no road rash except on my chin. Now I have found a Fox Rampage helmet that protects the chin.
I prefer the upright seating position for neck preservation, however slow & inefficient it is. I rode a cruiser (1961) english racer (1966) Mountain bike (1985) cargo bike (2017). Drag is really bad into a 20 mph headwind, only now with electricity I can equalize the effect of weather. No wind days I still ride mostly unpowered. My bike is 94 lb with panniers, tools, spares, water. I carry up to 80 lb supplies up & down >80 hills on my summer commute. Wind is still the major resistance, not weight IMHO. I only use a car when carrying things like a 460 lb mower deck (2 weeks ago, U-haul).
 

Jmedvm

New Member
Region
USA
City
Mesa, Arizona
Welcome to the site and the electric side of the hobby.
I grew up in Houston and found air conditioning the house less made me more used to the heat. Some A/C is necessary to keep the furniture from molding. I unloaded trailers at 100 deg & 100% humidity with no fan in my college summers. I also drank over a gallon a day, most of it water. Riding I wear long sleeve long pants dickies whatever the weather, to limit sunburn & road rash. Red Hat makes a 100% cotton mechanic's weight long sleeve tunic for July days. I wear $1 cotton/poly gloves too to keep the hand burn down. Last 25 mph fall, no road rash except on my chin. Now I have found a Fox Rampage helmet that protects the chin.
I prefer the upright seating position for neck preservation, however slow & inefficient it is. I rode a cruiser (1961) english racer (1966) Mountain bike (1985) cargo bike (2017). Drag is really bad into a 20 mph headwind, only now with electricity I can equalize the effect of weather. No wind days I still ride mostly unpowered. My bike is 94 lb with panniers, tools, spares, water. I carry up to 80 lb supplies up & down >80 hills on my summer commute. Wind is still the major resistance, not weight IMHO. I only use a car when carrying things like a 460 lb mower deck (2 weeks ago, U-haul).
Wow thank you! I lived in Houston for years, that’s one noble endeavor in the car worshipping land. It’s hard here also in Phoenix to change the urban sprawl into walkable/bikeable cities. But some of us are trying. I STILL feel invisible on my bike and aware of purposeful aggressive moves by car people: gunning it to get in front of me to stop in the right bike lane, using it as a car lane to make a right turn . Ugh
 

Comfortably Numb

Active Member
I found whenever I got on a roadbike I felt I had to work hard and go fast. (well, as fast as was fast was for me)
Like it was some sort of competition.
On the e-bike I simply just toodle along in no rush at all, but I know it will take me anywhere I want to go if I crank it up. I work as hard as I want, or don't want. That's the best part about e-bikes to me.
CN
 

Jmedvm

New Member
Region
USA
City
Mesa, Arizona
I found whenever I got on a roadbike I felt I had to work hard and go fast. (well, as fast as was fast was for me)
Like it was some sort of competition.
On the e-bike I simply just toodle along in no rush at all, but I know it will take me anywhere I want to go if I crank it up. I work as hard as I want, or don't want. That's the best part about e-bikes to me.
CN
I am learning to get in to that mindset. I sold my wonderful road bike today. You are spot on. I spend a lot of time meditating, aiming to be mindful and in the moment. This is a true opportunity to be better at that. Me too, I never relaxed on my road bike. I felt like I was still competing or training even when I was not. Thank you for pointing this out to me!
 

Methead

New Member
Region
Canada
City
Victoria
I had to give up road bikes many years ago (sadly) due to a knee issue from football. I was reluctant to spend the $ on an ebike thinking I might have to turn around and sell it b/c of my knee. Imagine how happy I was to find I could not only ride again but ride anywhere! Welcome to the forum! And thanks for the insights you've shared.

Cheers,

Lorne
 

Jmedvm

New Member
Region
USA
City
Mesa, Arizona
I had to give up road bikes many years ago (sadly) due to a knee issue from football. I was reluctant to spend the $ on an ebike thinking I might have to turn around and sell it b/c of my knee. Imagine how happy I was to find I could not only ride again but ride anywhere! Welcome to the forum! And thanks for the insights you've shared.

Cheers,

Lorne
Thank you Lorne! I appreciate it. I am so happy you can ride again! I bit the bullet and sold my road bike this week! Still can not get it out of my mind like an old flame leaving me. But I did find the perfect new home, the new owner is even going to do the AIDS LIFECYCLE ride that I did years ago! It was meant to be! She is also thrilled to get it!
 

Methead

New Member
Region
Canada
City
Victoria
Thank you Lorne! I appreciate it. I am so happy you can ride again! I bit the bullet and sold my road bike this week! Still can not get it out of my mind like an old flame leaving me. But I did find the perfect new home, the new owner is even going to do the AIDS LIFECYCLE ride that I did years ago! It was meant to be! She is also thrilled to get it!
Sweet story! Nice to know your ol' flame is going to someone who will take her places and show her a good time!
 

Methead

New Member
Region
Canada
City
Victoria
:) Love it when a fellow rider finds something I share warrants caps and an "!" ;)
 

Methead

New Member
Region
Canada
City
Victoria
Good morning from the West Coast! Hey I was thinking about your question about heat effecting the electronics/battery of your 'new to you bike'. My understanding is newer batteries are safe up to a pretty high temp. Electronics are good in even higher temps. What kind of temps does your garage see in the peak of summer? You might want to take the battery inside during those times - especially if you're charging it. On the west coast we never/rarely get near 40' C.....Google:

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Charging in High Temperatures? Generally, electric bike batteries should not be charged above 113°F (45°C). Many chargers prohibit charging above 122°F (50°C) and require the battery or ambient temperature to be lower than that to work.
 

MikeDD

Well-Known Member
There should be something in your owners manual about operating and charging temperatures.

For my Specialized Turbo Levo:

Charge the battery in temps 32 to 122 F. The battery will not charge if the temperature is over 122.
Operate the battery in temps -4 to 158 F.

Note the Specialized Mission Control app allows me to read the motors temperature and the health of my battery.
Since I store my bike in a garage I usually remove the battery when temps get over 100 F.