Hello from Portland,Oregon. I bought my first e-bike a Wallerang.

Lord Dreen

New Member
I purchased a Wallerang last week after testing 6 different bikes in one day. From a price range of $1500 up to $6500. This was the last bike I tested and I fell in love. Not the fastest, but the best overall feel for me.
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My brother lookin perplexed... Straight bar and grips replaced.
 
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dm nelson

Active Member
I purchased a Wallerang last week after testing 6 different bikes in one day. From a price range of $1500 up to $6500. This was the bike last bike I tested and I fell in love. Not the fastest, but the best overall feel for me.
View attachment 10985 View attachment 10988 View attachment 10991 My brother lookin perplexed... Straight bar and grips replaced.
Sweet looking, alot like my old Dutch bike, and I've read good things about them! Hope your brother got his curiosity satisfied by taking it out for a spin.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
@Lord Dreen

Congratulations on your new bike!

It's such a smart design. Such a well thought out bike. So often bikes that claim to be capable haulers will have a front fork mounted rack or front suspension, which neither work as well as a frame mounted front rack and solid fixed fork for a front load. From the handlebars, grips, front light that can't get blocked by a load and fully incorporated rear rack and fenders, what else could one need?

Have fun with it!
 

Lord Dreen

New Member
Sweet looking, alot like my old Dutch bike, and I've read good things about them! Hope your brother got his curiosity satisfied by taking it out for a spin.
Thanks DM. He finally took me up on my offer and rode it up the hill from my house. He's now contemplating building his fixie.
 

Lord Dreen

New Member
@Lord Dreen

Congratulations on your new bike!

It's such a smart design. Such a well thought out bike. So often bikes that claim to be capable haulers will have a front fork mounted rack or front suspension, which neither work as well as a frame mounted front rack and solid fixed fork for a front load. From the handlebars, grips, front light that can't get blocked by a load and fully incorporated rear rack and fenders, what else could one need?

Have fun with it!

Thanks J.R. It's a commuter for me, so it worked out best. My backpack can be strapped to the front and I can hold my change of clothes/laptop on the panniers. My wife and I used the bike to grab groceries, she rode the ebike to the store, as I rode my normal bike. She wanted to swap bikes after we left the store be cause of the amount of groceries we had. Within a block she asked to swap back bikes and then beat me home with a full load! It's been a great experience so far.
 

Lord Dreen

New Member
Congrats on your new bike. Looks great. I love the cargo aspect of the bike.

Shimano Di2 + STEPs. Nice combo, I used a similar config all summer.

A tip for traffic: Just before stopping at a red light, drop a gear or two and switch into High assist mode. When the light goes green, accelerate up to cruising speed, and then switch back into Eco mode. You'll get off the line quick, get some exercise, and still get decent mileage. Unlike some other mid-drives, this is easy to do because of the cockpit where everything falls under your thumbs, and because you're assisted by electronic shifting.

I wasn't really fond of the STEPs drive when I first tried it, but I started to like it more as I used it and compared its behavior to other mid-drives systems (I rode about 1000 miles on the STEPs). What's really great about this system is that the power delivery is extremely predictable. If you drop a gear and pedal at a slightly higher cadence, the power immediately kicks in. On some of these mid-drives, it's difficult to know what to do in order to get the most out them.

Anyway, have fun. And let us know about your experiences.


Thanks, and I appreciate the tips, JayVee! "What's really great about this system is that the power delivery is extremely predictable. If you drop a gear and pedal at a slightly higher cadence, the power immediately kicks in. On some of these mid-drives, it's difficult to know what to do in order to get the most out them." This is what I couldn't put into words. This is why, I felt, this bike was perfect for me. After trying the I-Zip, Raleigh, Kalkhoff and the Specialized, I couldn't find the right gearing or the proper cadence.With the STEPs combo it just felt right.
 

Aixa

New Member
Hello, I also fell in love with the way it handles. Ordered mine but thinking about a handle bar upgrade that gets me into a more relaxed position. Can you tell me a bit about the handle bar and grips you chose and measurements or other things to keep in mind when planning this upgrade? I am thinkink ergon GP1or GC1 but need to settle on the handle bar first.
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
@Lord Dreen, Congrats! I really like the expression on your face as you're looking at your new bike :D. Kinda, "wow, I really did just do this!" Anyway, you bought the right bike for you for the right reason; you feel good on it. That's the best reason. Keep us updated on your experiences.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
I purchased a Wallerang last week after testing 6 different bikes in one day...

Congrats on such a nice bike. I rode it last year at an ebike expo and it has a lot to offer. I sure like the looks of their new Tapper with the Steps 8000. Looks like Wallerang is building some great product.
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Totalresults

New Member
Congrats on your new bike. Looks great. I love the cargo aspect of the bike.

Shimano Di2 + STEPs. Nice combo, I used a similar config all summer.

A tip for traffic: Just before stopping at a red light, drop a gear or two and switch into High assist mode. When the light goes green, accelerate up to cruising speed, and then switch back into Eco mode. You'll get off the line quick, get some exercise, and still get decent mileage. Unlike some other mid-drives, this is easy to do because of the cockpit where everything falls under your thumbs, and because you're assisted by electronic shifting.

I wasn't really fond of the STEPs drive when I first tried it, but I started to like it more as I used it and compared its behavior to other mid-drives systems (I rode about 1000 miles on the STEPs). What's really great about this system is that the power delivery is extremely predictable. If you drop a gear and pedal at a slightly higher cadence, the power immediately kicks in. On some of these mid-drives, it's difficult to know what to do in order to get the most out them.

Anyway, have fun. And let us know about your experiences.
Thanks for the Tip for Traffic.
I'm new here, figuring out what system to get. (Due to my Inexperience I am going through a very reputable Electric Bike shop here in Eugene, Oregon) My Giant Stance is medium frame=tough trying to fit batteries. Electric bike shop has a 250 mid-drive full-suspension=$$$$, but only have ridden rear drives.
My seat post rear rack should hold battery, but worry about height for swinging leg over.

Need full suspension due to body being a Trainwreck.

If anyone can direct me to a forum section where I can start learning best ways to go, I'd appreciate it!