Hello need some help picking up my first ebike.

antboy

Active Member
If you're saving money, I'd go with the cheaper Outback with the rear hub motor. Voltbikes has a decent reputation.

That being said, if you're aiming more for commuting/food delivery in an urban/suburban area, and not off-roading, I'd personally skip the full suspension of the Outback and 3" wide tires and look at their Bravo with 2.1" wide tires.

Otherwise, it's the same bike, and probably better suited for such purposes. The thinner tires will also probably let you get away with riding on a slightly lower pedal assist, which is always good for battery life.

I only mention this because I know a couple of pizza delivery guys at the shop next to me, and we've chatted about e-bikes. For the record, they both use this...


If you're in the US, note that all the Amego prices are in Canadian dollars, but they ship to the US, as they have 2 warehouses in the states, so with the exchange rate, it might be worth looking at.

It's not as sporty looking as the Volt bikes, but the Amego is by far the most popular food delivery e-bike here in Toronto. One of the delivery guys has had the same bike for 3 winters now, and no problems other than regular bike maintenance and buying an extra couple of batteries.

I think it helps that Amego has a physical store, and sells everything from their own brand up to high end mid-drive bikes.
 

antboy

Active Member
I haven't ridden a Stromer, so can't speak to them. I'd personally want a throttle on a rear hub motor, but that's just my opinion. :)

I don't think Amego is open to the public due to "the covids", but once they do, you can probably take a few different brands out for test rides, to see what suits you best. If you're curious about more expensive mid-drives, you can also walk over to the Trek and Giant stores, both of which are just a couple of blocks west.
 

antboy

Active Member
I have made my decision and will be buying from NCM. I still am in the middle of the river though about which side to go to about fat tires aspen model or normal ones moscow model.
I assume you'll be getting it from Amego? If so, I think they had a special promotion for food delivery people, but I'm not sure if that's still around.

While fat tires are great in the snow, the 2.25" tires on the Moscow are good as well, and a little easier on the pedaling in the nicer weather. :)

I was actually considering the Moscow Plus as a second e-bike, but decided that I want a mid-drive better suited for trekking. I'm still keeping my rear-hub bike for "in-city" stuff like commuting and errand running.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
I have a fat tire bike. Big one and a little one. Not very useful in a big city on pavement. The knobby tires do howl.

Cool looks of a fat tire vs better battery mileage and a quiet ride on a regular tire. You'll be buying smooth tires to run on pavement, and that's $140 extra.

And if you run out of battery with a bag of food to be delivered, fat tires aren't so cool.
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
If you are doing more urban riding and food deliveries, you may be better off sticking with a rear hub motor along with slicker tires than knobbies for the same reasons indicated in this thread. The 'Schwalbe Marathon Plus' tires seem to be the front runner in best performance and great puncture protection. If you can, try to also test ride a rear hub model vs a mid-drive back to back to see what suits you best. Happy shopping and ride safe! :)
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
Hmm so don't go for fat tire bikes, okay :D. Well NCM is the choice then moscow plus that is. I mean I wanted a fat tire bike because I started seeing it everywhere, and its the trend now a days but don't always follow the flock it seems. Thanks a lot for the knowledge guys, I am still researching like crazy and it just gets more and more awesome haha.
Perhaps down the road when you start out with the bike that suits your style the best, you can get an additional fat tire E-bike that you could use for weekend/offroad riding. Sometimes it can be a tall order to find a dual purpose all in one bike for all your needs. Good Luck!
 

tomdav

Well-Known Member
I would test ride a few bikes before you buy, assuming it's still possible. The investment is relatively small for bikes you're considering, but it's still a chunk of money.

BTW, what's the fascination with NCM?
 

tomdav

Well-Known Member
NCM Plus doesn't look too bad for $2K CAD, but no torque sensing and 13ah battery:


For $2K CAD this gets you torque sensing and 17ah battery.

 

tomdav

Well-Known Member
Rize has good prices. Mixed reviews but not enough user feedback to draw any conclusions:


NCM has an even smaller sample size:


There may be some value to purchasing from LBS like Amego if you run into any issues.

As far as the RX, that has the Bafang Ultra mid drive. Depends on what you're looking for. You can pre-order the upgraded Rize 2020 as well (says ships in May).
 
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antboy

Active Member
Rize has good prices. Mixed reviews but not enough user feedback to draw any conclusions:


NCM has an even smaller sample size:


There may be some value to purchasing from LBS like Amego if you run into any issues.

As far as the RX, that has the Bafang Ultra mid drive. Depends on what you're looking for. You can pre-order the upgraded Rize 2020 as well (says ships in May).
Rize is formerly Spark (they rebranded as Rize due to there being other "Spark" e-bike brands globally).


I personally had no problem with customer service. We bought two Spark Minis, and one was clearly dropped during shipping. They offered to pay for the repairs.

Others have had a mixed bag of results with them, though.
 

byunbee

Well-Known Member
Crazy Lenny has good deals and a wide selection. But as most folks on the forum recommends, ride a few (similar bikes - motor, forks, frame type, etc.) before making a purchase. You wouldn't buy a car without test driving it first right?


There's also a marketplace for bikes you can get good deals on time to time.
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
Crazy Lenny has good deals and a wide selection. But as most folks on the forum recommends, ride a few (similar bikes - motor, forks, frame type, etc.) before making a purchase. You wouldn't buy a car without test driving it first right?


There's also a marketplace for bikes you can get good deals on time to time.
"You wouldn't buy a car without test driving it first right"?
It is astounding to me how many drivers I have found purchasing online collector cars/daily drivers sight unseen. The buyers never saw the vehicles in person nor had it reviewed by a reputable third party independent vehicle inspection service prior to purchase. After sale, they reported a boat load of problems that were never revealed by the original seller. Makes no sense to me why anyone would do something like this. Cheesh!
 

Mike_V

Member
Buying an eBike 'on time'?
Now?
Tough payment during times that try men souls
A good conversion kit might last several " bikes "longer than that payment plan