Help choosing after NCM Moscow Stolen

clayjulio69

New Member
After riding my Moscow since June, it was stolen today from outside my office. The thief cut through my ulock and rode off with the bike. Super pissed, but I did love the bike. Only qualms were battery life, weight/size and the breaks having to be adjusted all the time. Otherwise, it was nice to have fat wheels and a good suspension if only for potholes. Anyway, anyone have any thoughts on something similar but not quite as hefty- maybe something that will not stick out too much as a $1000 bike in Philadelphia? (Also- def getting the best U-lock I can).
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
After riding my Moscow since June, it was stolen today from outside my office. The thief cut through my ulock and rode off with the bike. Super pissed, but I did love the bike. Only qualms were battery life, weight/size and the breaks having to be adjusted all the time. Otherwise, it was nice to have fat wheels and a good suspension if only for potholes. Anyway, anyone have any thoughts on something similar but not quite as hefty- maybe something that will not stick out too much as a $1000 bike in Philadelphia? (Also- def getting the best U-lock I can).
So you didn't have a Moscow Plus, just Moscow?
I'm guessing this by your statement how you had to adjust brakes often. (Moscow Plus has hydraulic brakes, Moscow has mechanical brakes)

I'm a little confused, what did you mean by fat wheels? Moscow or Moscow Plus are not fat bikes. NCM Aspen is.

Also, what kind of lock did you have?
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Also, I would invest more in your U Lock.
Cheap U locks can be easily broken by hydraulic bolt cutter, whereas expensive ones would require angle grinder, which inevitably attract more attention.

My favorite ones are Kryptonite yellow locks (New York or Fahgettaboudit)

 

clayjulio69

New Member
Well, not stick out as much so it doesn't get stolen again. And not as hefty as in not bumping into the walls as I bring it down the staircase into my basement every time I use it and easier to weave between cars. The handlebars were pretty wide.
 

clayjulio69

New Member
And thanks, this one was actually cut with an angle grinder, I believe. The picture shows the cut through the cable and the steel U lock.
 

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Timpo

Well-Known Member
Well, not stick out as much so it doesn't get stolen again. And not as hefty as in not bumping into the walls as I bring it down the staircase into my basement every time I use it and easier to weave between cars. The handlebars were pretty wide.
So are you looking for a folding bike?

And you want something that doesn't look expensive? 🤔
 

clayjulio69

New Member
Super painful :(. And a security guard saw it happen and did nothing!

Anyway, I was thinking of something with an integrated battery- Possibly the Ride1up Core-5 or something similar... Any thoughts on something around that price range?
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
I followed the rule of thumb to spend at least 10% of bike price on locks. Very important, is to always always use the locks in ways that do not invite defeat, like locking to something weak that can be cut through easily, or uprooted, or to a small bike stand that isn't even attached to the concrete. Probably a good idea to shop for some locks before you buy the bike so you have them right away at the best prices. Looking at $150- $200 of locks IMO.
It hurts to spend $200 on locks but it's cheaper in the long run, so just do it! and choose wisely.
 

EMGX

Well-Known Member
When my truck was broken into several years ago the security dept at my office couldn't have cared less. Security probably has only limited authorization and ability to protect building assets. Even police can't provide basic protection against ongoing criminal activity in the cities anymore and bicycle theft was never a priority. Could you bring a folder into your building? If not you are sort of hosed because an angle grinder can cut through just about anything including hardened steel. The best protection might be to have a nasty cheap looking bike that poses less of a theft target. Maybe a older used bike with a kit. For a while I had a Tongsheng 36v 500w mid drive on an old Dahon Jack 26" folder. It is a decent bike and weighed mid #40's with the motor and battery. Now the Tongsheng is on my wife's 24" Dahon Briza folder. Kit cost $415 plus battery, installation was fast, easy and straight forward on the Jack (Briza required some frame modification because it has an odd non-standard frame). Mid drive makes flat tires much easier and quicker to fix. Here it was when on my Jack, battery in the handlebar pouch and with Anderson electrical connectors a battery can easily be removed to be brought inside.

20201101_142909.jpg
 
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john peck

Well-Known Member
After riding my Moscow since June, it was stolen today from outside my office. The thief cut through my ulock and rode off with the bike. Super pissed, but I did love the bike. Only qualms were battery life, weight/size and the breaks having to be adjusted all the time. Otherwise, it was nice to have fat wheels and a good suspension if only for potholes. Anyway, anyone have any thoughts on something similar but not quite as hefty- maybe something that will not stick out too much as a $1000 bike in Philadelphia? (Also- def getting the best U-lock I can).
Major bummer, but now you have an excuse to get a moscow+. Wish I did. Mine is great, but the
plus is better. I alway take the battery with me. Then all they can steal is a heavy, otherwise obsolete
mtn. bike. Of course,I live in a very very low crime area & every one knows whose bike that is. The
cops here are very well paid to do nothing most of the time. I´m okay with that.
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
Locks are a decent strategy for short public stays, but for work or home, it's best to rely on someone else's 'lock', ie. use an area that's already secured. Locking up a bike in the same place for several hours uninterrupted is just a matter of time until it gets stolen in most places. Bring your bike into the office, and if someone gives you trouble, explain you already lost one bike and there is no real alternative to bringing it in. Don't rely on a good samaritan to stop a guy with an angle grinder, or the cowardice of thieves not to steal in broad daylight.

A non-fat bike with sub-60cm handlebars will be easier to move indoors.
 
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