help choosing an ebike or build

nazar

New Member
hi, :) new to forum - go to where knowledge is :D

i have built an ebike before - did the job but realised i should have chosen a rear drive instead of front,,,, and as things change so quickly i am hoping to get some advice.

buy or build - not phased either way

what i want - Fat bike, sit up design or as upright as possible, 1000w motor, 45km distance not peddling (i weigh 65kg), good instruments and indicator of charge, rear hub or mid drive, disc brakes (this is a must) prefer hydrolic (as hands arent that strong)

found this one (haven't checked out fully but seems okay) https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Cus...2792584305.html?spm=2114.01010208.8.73.67gJBh

price - i am hoping to be under $3000 australian

any help appreciated
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
Hi Nazar,

Luna Cycle have an Aussie location in Perth selling their kits and offering free shipping on parts (not batteries or bikes) from California when you pay $1,000 through their Australian website (easily done with motor and battery). You might consider converting something like a Fuji Beartooth 1.3 with 3 inch wide tires, front suspension fork, and Tektro hydraulic disc brakes, the bike is $1400 AUD and a BBSHD motor with battery is $1750 AUD with tax, so just a bit over your $3k budget. The 30A controller and 52V battery combo means peak power of around 1500W, half again more powerful and 30lb lighter than the bike in the link you posted.
 
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nazar

New Member
hmmm, i may have underestimated the amount i need to pay :D the bike above is not dual suspension :)
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
the bike above is not dual suspension
On paved and gravel trails you can get away with a suspension seatpost and a sprung saddle but if you're doing bush track riding there are some dual suspension MTBs here. You'll have to go with something like a Fuji Outland 1.3 to stay reasonably close to your budget but this Giant Stance ($2kAUD) was used by Luna to make a dual suspension MTB conversion with their BBSHD motor.
 
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harryS

Well-Known Member
I bought the LCD display I see in your aliexpress fatbike link from risun motor's ebay store. I have that bafang motor in a fatbike I converted. It's a strong motor for pavement. Will go 24 mph on 48 volts. I bet it's a typo when they say 9 speed cassette. I see an 8 speed in the picture. Probably a free wheel, but nothing wrong with that,in my opinion.

Big 20AH battery is nice, but look where they put the controller, under the BB. Going get dirty. They are sealed though.

Hmm. Would I want a BBSHD or a geared Bafang motor? I have a BBS02 750 W motor. The BBSHD is a stronger motor if you use the gears right. Might be more reliable.
 

Lost

Active Member
Having both a rear drive (Rad Power Rover) and Mid drive (Brand new Specialized Roll / Luna BBSO2), I am pretty firmly leaning to the mid drive. It's like having a 4 cylinder car with a six speed transmission vs a 4 cylinder car stuck in 2nd gear. They both work, but the one with the six speed is more practical. I went with a BBSO2 because the power is plenty, and it is a little easier on the battery with max current. $450 for the BBSO2, $400 for the battery, and $550 for the bike. I am a happy camper.
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nazar

New Member
wow, thanks heaps, i really appreciate the help - so much has changed since i did my first conversion (probably 7 years ago),
just above - what you said about the mid drive over the rear drive was very helpful, thanks heaps :)
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
I would have to agree with @Lost. If you only have room for one type and you want power, the mid drive is probably best. When I said reliable, I meant that the BBSHD handles over heating better than the BBS02. I don't ride throttle only, but I did try it with my BBS02 for a few miles at 14-16 mph to check battery consumption. and my motor got very hot whereas it usually just runs warm.

However, if you really are going to ride miles and miles w/o pedaling, maybe a big 1000W direct drive motor is what you need. No plastic (really nylon) gears to melt. Lots of power. Lots of rotational mass for coasting, once you get to speed. Not for pedaling either. Probably a bad combo for a fat bike though, if ridden off pavement.
 

nazar

New Member
@harryS if i can't work out a fat bike - i am thinking of converting a mountain bike i have. i have a good mountain bike i use for pedaling.
what i intend to use it for is enjoyment on trails and tracks, i don't imagine i would do a lot of pedaling as i tire easily (and having pedal option is a good thing if battery runs out :)

what motor would you recommend for tracks and trails without pedaling????