Help choosing parts for build

Gjansen

New Member
Hi. I just picked up a couple of vintage Raleigh Rambler MX bikes. I'd like to convert them to electric. I have converted my parents trikes to electric, so I'm a little familiar with this, but still going into uncharted waters a bit.

My wife and I will primarily be using them to ride the trails around our home. Purely pleasure rides. We don't need tons of range or speed. I'm thinking 36v 500w should be good?

I'd like to keep the look of the bikes as original as possible. I was thinking about using a rear wheel conversion kit (for looks), but then started wondering about weight distribution when you add batteries.... Front would be o.k., if I could find a hub in chrome that doesn't look so big. I also am toying with the idea of getting a kit with a chrome hub with the same 36 spokes, and then getting some smaller spokes and reusing the nice gold rims that came with the bike. I have a friend who builds wheels who could help.

The bikes have coaster brakes. I'm not sure if adding a regular brake up front will be enough. Not sure what the holes on the fork near the axle are for.

I'll probably go with a simple thumb switch for the throttle, hide the LCD with the controller somewhere.

For batteries, not sure what to do. The bottle batteries look nice, but I'm not sure they have enough power. I'm not quite sure how many amps or whatever battery I will need for say 10-15 miles of assist or cruising. It's mostly flat here. Another option is to buy some pre-made battery packs (with the blue plastic around them) and hide them in some kind of case or bag.

I have a pretty complete shop here, plenty of tools and plenty of experience building and fixing things.

I'm mainly looking for some ideas from some experienced builders. Again, I want to keep it as stealthy as possible, keeping the original look as much as possible, even if it's at the sacrifice of some range or convenience.

Thanks so much!
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harryS

Well-Known Member
Coaster brakes would tell me to go front wheel drive. Are those steel forks? If so, they should handle a 250-500W geared motor. If you discipline yourself to stay under 16 mph, the coaster brake would suffice, but safety suggests that you tack weld some tabs on the forks for disk brakes. That will require buying a front wheel that can take a rotor and the calipers/cable. About $100. If you don't weld, then you cab replace the fork. Most ebike kits come with inexpensive brake levers rigged with switches to cut off the motor..
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Looking at those bikes, you're not going to be riding them in a fashion where weight distribution really matters.

But I'll tell you. You can buy these Mangos for $899 and you''ll probably spend that on a motor/battery.
 

Gjansen

New Member
I can weld, but would most likely just add a regular V brake (or whatever they are called) at the top of the fork. There is already a hole there for it.

I got the parts for my parent's bikes for about $500 each. $225 for the kit, $275 for the battery. That was for 48v 1000w setup. If I wanted an out of the box solution, those Mangos would be a good buy!
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
That would be for center pull brakes. Not as good as cantilever rim brakes. which go on two posts.

I've installed two of these geared motors. There were $100 cheaper when I bought them. He sells a LCD and LED version. DIdn't like the LCD version. Doesn't show speed when coasting, and although it has 5 levels of assist, all were too strong.The LED is only 3 speed, but works better in my opinion,

 

stanmiller

Active Member
My wife's bike is somewhat stealth with the bottle battery and hub motor, but wiring could be improved.


Good luck with project!
 

Gjansen

New Member
My wife's bike is somewhat stealth with the bottle battery and hub motor, but wiring could be improved.


Good luck with project!


That looks great. Stealthy enough for me. I'm not sure how many watts I'll need. Does the 250w provide enough power for medium speed, battery only cruising on flat roads? How many miles roughly does that battery get you? How is it on medium sized hills? Thanks for your help!
 

dunksalot

Member
My wife's bike is somewhat stealth with the bottle battery and hub motor, but wiring could be improved.


Good luck with project!
OMG that is amazing! You have a battery in that bottle? You totally fooled me...you can lock it up and park it like a normal bike anywhere and nobody would notice.
 

Gjansen

New Member
I just found these kits on Ebay. 500w and 750W.


Any advice on which battery I should get? I'd like to pair it with one of those water bottle looking ones. It looks like they come in 7ah and 10.5AH.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
The 7.5-10AH models is longer than what you saw in the pictures above, because they put 30 cells in there,. Unit Pack Power sells them on ebay , their china website and maybe on amazon. I've got a 7AH and 10AH from them, The former is pretty low capacity. They might only push 20A continuous, which is OK for a 500W motor. My own 500W ebike will cover 20 miles on 6AH at 13 mph.








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Nova Haibike

Well-Known Member
I would first install front and rear caliper brakes on the bikes before attemting any motor install. Long armed caliper brakes will be on the flexible side, so you should determine if they will perform adequately, or at least to your satisfaction. If not, then scrap the entire idea.
 

stanmiller

Active Member
That looks great. Stealthy enough for me. I'm not sure how many watts I'll need. Does the 250w provide enough power for medium speed, battery only cruising on flat roads? How many miles roughly does that battery get you? How is it on medium sized hills? Thanks for your help!

These Bafang SWX02 motors always welcome hill climbing help be that the 250 or 50OW models. We have medium sized hills in Charlotte and they are not too long.

I'm 200 lbs and have ridden her bike 13 miles on a charge, but that's probably the most I would ask of it. On flats, it will top out at 23 mph, PAS level 5.

The 250W motor is suprisingly powerful. Obviously the 500W has more get-up-and-go, but the 250W can hold its own.