Help deciding between Sondors Fold XS and E-Lux Sierra GT for first folding fat tire E-Bike

Bluethunder73

Member
Region
USA
I am looking at buying my first fat tire small folding e-bike. So far, I have narrowed it down to two choices. Sondors Fold XS and E-Lux Sierra GT. I like that the Sondors model has a better motor, brakes, metal chain guide, plus looks clean with the wires hidden in the frame. However, I like how E-Lux comes with painted to match fenders and integrated lights, plus they have a factory showroom not far from me. However, from what I have seen in a few reviews, E-lux uses a plastic chain guide as well as the fold point is close to where your knees might be when pedaling. Also, not sure if a 20-inch size small bike like these would be too small for a normal 5’5” male adult or not. With all this said if you had to choose between the brands I mentioned above, which one and why? Any thoughts and comments would be appreciated.

SONDORS Fold XS

E-Lux Sierra GT
 

Court

Administrator
Staff member
Hey @Bluethunder73! I moved your post to the "Help Choosing" section so maybe you'll get some feedback. I've ridden models from both companies and definitely lean towards bikes with local shop + support. It sounds like the parts on the E-Lux are a bit downgraded (like the plastic chain guide) but that may be a non-issue if you're mostly on road and light trails. Since you're an average sized male, maybe your knees won't hit the joint anyway? I actually haven't had much issue with that, but my girlfriend has at times (she's shorter). If you're handy with tools and willing to do some assembly and tuneups yourself, SONDORS makes good bikes for the price, they've consistently surprised me over the years :)
 

Bluethunder73

Member
Region
USA
Hey @Bluethunder73! I moved your post to the "Help Choosing" section so maybe you'll get some feedback. I've ridden models from both companies and definitely lean towards bikes with local shop + support. It sounds like the parts on the E-Lux are a bit downgraded (like the plastic chain guide) but that may be a non-issue if you're mostly on road and light trails. Since you're an average sized male, maybe your knees won't hit the joint anyway? I actually haven't had much issue with that, but my girlfriend has at times (she's shorter). If you're handy with tools and willing to do some assembly and tuneups yourself, SONDORS makes good bikes for the price, they've consistently surprised me over the years :)
Thank You Court, for moving my post. I am new to the EBR community and was not sure where the best place to post my question was. Thanks for the advice.
 

Bredmounds

New Member
I am looking at buying my first fat tire small folding e-bike. So far, I have narrowed it down to two choices. Sondors Fold XS and E-Lux Sierra GT. I like that the Sondors model has a better motor, brakes, metal chain guide, plus looks clean with the wires hidden in the frame. However, I like how E-Lux comes with painted to match fenders and integrated lights, plus they have a factory showroom not far from me. However, from what I have seen in a few reviews, E-lux uses a plastic chain guide as well as the fold point is close to where your knees might be when pedaling. Also, not sure if a 20-inch size small bike like these would be too small for a normal 5’5” male adult or not. With all this said if you had to choose between the brands I mentioned above, which one and why? Any thoughts and comments would be appreciated.

SONDORS Fold XS

E-Lux Sierra GT
I can tell you best bike for you.
 

Ebiker33

Well-Known Member
I own a Sondors Fold XS, it's a great starter Ebike for the price, $1699, best entry level 20" on the market....that being said, I am planning on my next ebike with more power to climb hills.
Knowing what I know now, I would not get anything less than a 25 Amp controller and a 48 Amp battery, the controller rating is super important to allow for a full flow of power IF you need it.
I can't find the E-Lux rating, but the Sondors is only 20 amps
 

Bredmounds

New Member
I am looking at buying my first fat tire small folding e-bike. So far, I have narrowed it down to two choices. Sondors Fold XS and E-Lux Sierra GT. I like that the Sondors model has a better motor, brakes, metal chain guide, plus looks clean with the wires hidden in the frame. However, I like how E-Lux comes with painted to match fenders and integrated lights, plus they have a factory showroom not far from me. However, from what I have seen in a few reviews, E-lux uses a plastic chain guide as well as the fold point is close to where your knees might be when pedaling. Also, not sure if a 20-inch size small bike like these would be too small for a normal 5’5” male adult or not. With all this said if you had to choose between the brands I mentioned above, which one and why? Any thoughts and comments would be appreciated.

SONDORS Fold XS

E-Lux Sierra GT
I am looking at buying my first fat tire small folding e-bike. So far, I have narrowed it down to two choices. Sondors Fold XS and E-Lux Sierra GT. I like that the Sondors model has a better motor, brakes, metal chain guide, plus looks clean with the wires hidden in the frame. However, I like how E-Lux comes with painted to match fenders and integrated lights, plus they have a factory showroom not far from me. However, from what I have seen in a few reviews, E-lux uses a plastic chain guide as well as the fold point is close to where your knees might be when pedaling. Also, not sure if a 20-inch size small bike like these would be too small for a normal 5’5” male adult or not. With all this said if you had to choose between the brands I mentioned above, which one and why? Any thoughts and comments would be appreciated.

SONDORS Fold XS

E-Lux Sierra GT
I can tell you the best bike for best price. Overfly. Best Price and and no games like some companies. Make sure you know what your getting because quite a few lie to sell more bikes. 20210131_073538_08.jpg
20210131_073538_08.jpg
 

Bluethunder73

Member
Region
USA
I own a Sondors Fold XS, it's a great starter Ebike for the price, $1699, best entry level 20" on the market....that being said, I am planning on my next ebike with more power to climb hills.
Knowing what I know now, I would not get anything less than a 25 Amp controller and a 48 Amp battery, the controller rating is super important to allow for a full flow of power IF you need it.
I can't find the E-Lux rating, but the Sondors is only 20 amps
That is good to know about the size amp of the controller and battery. Up to this point I have been focused more on the watt size of the motor. Which from what I can see 500 – 750Watt seems to be the normal for an entry level ebike. I appreciate the good information.
 

Bluethunder73

Member
Region
USA
I can tell you the best bike for best price. Overfly. Best Price and and no games like some companies. Make sure you know what your getting because quite a few lie to sell more bikes.View attachment 77938View attachment 77938
That is a good-looking bike, nice messenger side bags.
I can tell you the best bike for best price. Overfly. Best Price and and no games like some companies. Make sure you know what your getting because quite a few lie to sell more bikes.View attachment 77938View attachment 77938
That is a good-looking bike, nice messenger side bags.
 

Ebiker33

Well-Known Member
That is good to know about the size amp of the controller and battery. Up to this point I have been focused more on the watt size of the motor. Which from what I can see 500 – 750Watt seems to be the normal for an entry level ebike. I appreciate the good information.
Yes they can rate the motor at whatever they want, but what power wattage is allowed to flow into it, A X V = W is a very useful formula.
The Bafang Ultra motor can handle 2300W but most only let it get 750W nominal to keep it legal in America.
There was another company(major brand) that denigrated their own power rating so they could sell it into Europe, they obviously didn't care it could hurt their NA sales.
They rated their motors at 250W but when an independent Ebike tester actually tested it they were actually 600-700W at full output.
 
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