Help me customize this bike to be the most comfortable ride possible!

TruTru9

New Member
Hello EBR,

I hope this is the right section. My brother is getting the Raleigh Redux IE as his birthday gift. I was wondering what kind of after-market customization I can do to make the ride more comfortable.

1) Court recommended the BodyFlow on his review, so we will have the shop get that.

2) What about tires? Is it possible to put a thicker tire on this bike? Current size is 27.5x2.0. Any tire recommendations? 99% of the ride would be on the road and sidewalks and some potholes :D

3) No gears? My brother had an opportunity to ride a bike with nuvinci harmony setup where he didn't have to think about changing gears. He is on the autistic spectrum and the less things he has to focus on while riding, the better for him. What's the possibility of having a setup like that with the Redux IE?

Any and all comments are welcome!

Here are the bike Specs
Code:
Battery    36V Li-ion, 13.8Ah, 496.8Wh
Display    LCD multi-functional display
Max Assisted Speed    28 mph (45 kph)
Motor    250W Brose Centerdrive system, 90NM of torque
Range Estimated    35-80 miles
Frame    AL-6061 Custom Butted Aluminum, City Geometry
Fork    Light alloy fork, thru-axle
Cranks    44T steel, narrow-wide
Rear Derailleur    Shimano Deore
Shifter    Shimano Deore 10spd
Brakes    Shimano M365 Hydraulic Disc, F180/R160mm Rotors
Cogset    Shimano HG62, 10spd (11-32t)
Rims    Alex MD21
Tires    Schwalbe Big Ben, 27.5x2.0"
Handlebar    Alloy 31.8, W:640mm
Stem    TranzX Anti-Shock, 31.8 Lengths: 80/90mm
Seatpost    TranzX Anti-shock, 31.6x300mm
Seat    Velo Raleigh
Headset    VP Integrated
Chain    KMC X10e EPT
Front Hub    Novatec 15mm thru-axle
Rear Hub    Novatec 12mm thru-axle
Spokes    Stainless
Grips    Raleigh Grips
 

Bicyclista

Active Member
The BodyFloat will definitively make the ride more comfortable.

Ask the shop if the frame will allow wider tires. I doubt the clearances will allow a lot more, and the benefit of a tiny bit wider tire, say 2.2", will be minimal.

Changing to an automatic gear-change system would be expensive, if it can be done at all. You would be better off buying a bike already set up that way.

You could ask the shop to install a suspension fork. An expensive upgrade if it can be done, but it would add to comfort. With the BodyFloat and a suspension fork your brother will not need wider tires, specially if he rides mainly on pavement.

Ergonomic grips, ergonomic saddle, lights, rack, fenders (if you live in an area with rain and snow), mirror, bell, better pedals, are all worthy upgrades.
 

TruTru9

New Member
The BodyFloat will definitively make the ride more comfortable.

Ask the shop if the frame will allow wider tires. I doubt the clearances will allow a lot more, and the benefit of a tiny bit wider tire, say 2.2", will be minimal.

Changing to an automatic gear-change system would be expensive, if it can be done at all. You would be better off buying a bike already set up that way.

You could ask the shop to install a suspension fork. An expensive upgrade if it can be done, but it would add to comfort. With the BodyFloat and a suspension fork your brother will not need wider tires, specially if he rides mainly on pavement.

Ergonomic grips, ergonomic saddle, lights, rack, fenders (if you live in an area with rain and snow), mirror, bell, better pedals, are all worthy upgrades.
Thanks for your reply. It's always so good to hear feedback.
Bike is ordered :D BodyFloat is ordered. Any suggestions for a suspension fork that's good for pavement? and lots of potholes :D
 

Bicyclista

Active Member
I upgraded the rigid fork of my Salsa El Mariachi (a non-electric mountain bike) with a RockShox Recon suspension fork (about $200). But again, consult with your bike shop because it may or may not be possible to do. Suspension forks change the geometry of the bike and can lead to squirrelly handling. They also come with different sized steerer tubes, tapered or non-tapered, so you have to get the right one for your bike.

Up until recently I believed that one could only upgrade to a suspension fork if the bike was "suspension corrected," i.e. designed in advance to take a suspension fork even when sold with a rigid fork (which was typically longer). Ravi Kempaiah, who posts here frequently and who works in a bike shop, believes you can upgrade any bike to a suspension fork as long as the suspension travel does not exceed about 100mm (about 4 inches).

My bike shop at first did not want to install the suspension fork on my Salsa. They were afraid it would not work. They then contacted Salsa and found that my frame was indeed "suspension corrected," and they moved forward. It made my bike much more comfortable and, in fact, easier to ride.
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
Running the low end of the air pressure for any given tire makes a BIG difference. It increases drag a bit so normal bikers don't like to do it, but with E assist, it's a no brainer.
2.0 is a wide tire, it it says 60-100 psi run it at 55 or 60 and the difference versus 100 is almost like adding suspension.
Try it before spending the $ on a suspension fork IF the roads aren't horrible where he rides.