Help picking a commuter bike before moving to Norway

Cameron G

New Member
Hi everyone,

I've been spending weeks looking at electric commuter bikes in anticipation of an upcoming move from the USA to Norway. I anticipate riding back and forth to work mostly on pavement, but frequently in rain/snow and in the dark. So I want a bike with good tires, brakes, fenders, and lights. I've been mostly looking at bikes under $3000.

I was all ready to purchase a DOST Drop, but they seem to be sold out until mid-August. I then read that legal ebikes in Norway must cycle "with pedal assistance which are equipped with an auxiliary electric motor having a maximum continuous rated power of 0.25 kW, of which the output is progressively reduced and finally cut off as the vehicle reaches a speed of 25 km/h or if the cyclist stops pedaling."

I'm not sure how strongly these rules are enforced, as it limits the number of options in choosing a bike, but also want to be respectful of the local laws.

So far my research has me focussed on three bikes: 1) Haibike SDURO Trekking 4.0, 2) OHM Quest, and 3) Yamaha Cross Connect.

I have a few questions I was hoping the forum could help with:

1) Are there any other bikes you would recommend?

2) Will I be able to find a European 220v charger that is compatible with the batteries?

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

thanks,

Cameron
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Buy the bike in Norway. It will conform to the Euro specs. Note that transporting the battery from the United States to Europe is not easy.

There are several facts about Norway:
  1. Summers are very warm but winters are very cold and snowy there . The only exception is the south-western coast (Stavanger, Bergen) where it is rarely colder than 32 F but the winter winds make cycling impossible. Cycling in the warm season yes, in the winter no. You have been warned.
  2. Norway is an extremely hilly country. It is the best to buy an e-MTB or a respected mid-drive commuter e-bike with a torquey Specialized/Brose or Syncdrive/Yamaha motor. Inspect the Norwegian websites of the big manufacturers for model availability.
  3. Norway is shockingly expensive for an American but only quality goods including e-bikes are being sold there. A Haibike with Yamaha motor is a good idea. Consider a Giant (these are better represented in Europe than they are in the U.S.) or a Specialized Turbo Vado.
  4. The police are serious in Norway. Take part in an accident and be sure your e-bike will be inspected if it was street legal. If I were you I wouldn't even try to ride a U.S. specced e-bike there.
  5. No throttle allowed in Europe.
  6. You are allowed to ride bike paths, roads and all trails in wild nature with an e-bike in Norway.
Hope that helps.
 
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Cameron G

New Member
Thanks Stefan for your thoughtful answers!

I'll be in Trondheim, where winter temps are slightly cooler than Bergen with a less rain.

I'll start looking into some of your suggestions.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
I have edited my post several times, Cameron. Trondheim, OK. Still no winter rides or I'm wrong :D Probably not. I know Norway pretty well. Haven't tried cycling there, though,

Norway is an "electric" country. You will see a big number of electric cars there. I know e-bikes are popular there, too.
 
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pmcdonald

Well-Known Member
Oh my, Trondheim looks gorgeous!

Sounds like you're on the right path with a Haibike or similar.

Given the global state of supply it might be worth sizing it up locally as best you can and then liaising with a Trondheim-based dealer to have a bike ordered for you on arrival. Can any native Norwegians conment on things on the ground at the moment.

Off topic, living in Sydney at the time with its notoriously high cost of living Norway was the one country I've visited where the costs really raised my eyebrows! 6 euros for a cup of coffee, ouch. And that was including travels to NY, Paris, Switzerland. Still, totally amazing country and people. More exploration is on the bucket list, assuming international leisure travel ever becomes a thing again..