Help selecting comfort handlebars for eMTB - BH Rebel Lynx PWX

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
The Jones bars are standard diameter so most grips should work unless they are an odd size. The Ergon grips with bar ends might be a bit awkward with the 45 degree sweep. Cable length is always a consideration when swapping bars. Control cables (brake & shift) aren't too difficult or expensive to replace if necessary. The ebike wiring harness is another story. Some brands offer extender cables which just plug into the existing connectors. It is sometimes necessary to piece out the wiring which requires a bit of skill. Doing so may also void the bike warranty. Your LBS may be able to help you here.
To get an idea of the fit, I removed the grip and controls from one end of my existing bar. I held them in the approximate position where they would be on the Jones bars to see if there was enough slack in the cables & wiring. The Jones website gives bar dimensions. In my case, the old bars were the swept back mustache style so there was plenty of slack. I don't own a BH but from pictures, it doesn't look like there is much cable slack on the bike to work with. Again, your dealer may be able to advise you.
I'm 5 foot 7 with short arms. Hence I would like the backsweep. Your son has this same bike - do you think the Jones would fit on it? It looks like the display might be limited in cable length. I agree that I don't want to mess with getting new display extension wires and voiding the nice 5 year warranty.

The problem looks like the control panel has a limited cable length to the main display.
With the Jones bars, the control unit might not sit close to the end of the bars where the grips are?

I own a BH Rebel 5.5 with the Yamaha PW-X system and there is plenty of slack in the control cables and wiring to add a riser stem and swept-back bar.
There is no need to worry about extender cables or rewiring any controls. Hope this helps... ;)
 
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I own a BH Rebel 5.5 with the Yamaha PW-X system and there is plenty of slack in the control cables and wiring to add a riser stem and swept-back bar.
There is no need to worry about extender cables or rewiring any controls. Hope this helps... ;)
Thanks - if there is no need for changing my cable housing then it sounds like I can change the bars out myself.

Is there anything I should know about our bike for changing out the handlebars, or is it a simple matter of taking off the shifters/brakes and putting them on the new bars? Should I use a Torque Wrench for re screwing the shifters/brakes?
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Thanks - if there is no need for changing my cable housing then it sounds like I can change the bars out myself.

Is there anything I should know about our bike for changing out the handlebars, or is it a simple matter of taking off the shifters/brakes and putting them on the new bars? Should I use a Torque Wrench for re screwing the shifters/brakes?
When I swapped the bars and grips it was a simple process... just remember to re-torque the stem and controls to 3-4 Nm as required. ;)
 

DouglasB

Active Member
One thing to watch out for is having your hands too far out to the side. If your hands are too far out, it may feel more stable but it's putting your arms out too far. The thing you want is to have your body as close to a "neutral" position as possible. "Neutral" just means keeping it within the natural range of motion for that specific part of your body. You may have a bit of extra control for someting like a mountain bike with your hands in a wide stance but if you are holding that position for more than a couple of hours and it is even slightly out of the "neutral" range, it will begin to take it toll. I whacked off several inches from the width of my handlebars and feel more relaxed because of it.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
One thing to watch out for is having your hands too far out to the side. If your hands are too far out, it may feel more stable but it's putting your arms out too far. The thing you want is to have your body as close to a "neutral" position as possible. "Neutral" just means keeping it within the natural range of motion for that specific part of your body. You may have a bit of extra control for someting like a mountain bike with your hands in a wide stance but if you are holding that position for more than a couple of hours and it is even slightly out of the "neutral" range, it will begin to take it toll. I whacked off several inches from the width of my handlebars and feel more relaxed because of it.

I agree with the neutral ergonomics observation and cut down my bars from 31"/790mm to 25"/640mm. ;)
 
For street riding, I use the type below because they are super comfortable. Unless you're riding a mountain bike on off road trails, 90% of H-bars are designed the wrong way. Drop your hands down by your sides, then slowly raise them and see what position they're in. Then turn them to where they would be on straight bars. That throws your wrists, elbows and shoulders all out of whack. I learned a little when I worked in an orthopedic ward.
 

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FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
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For street riding, I use the type below because they are super comfortable. Unless you're riding a mountain bike on off road trails, 90% of H-bars are designed the wrong way.
Drop your hands down by your sides, then slowly raise them and see what position they're in. Then turn them to where they would be on straight bars.
That throws your wrists, elbows and shoulders all out of whack. I learned a little when I worked in an orthopedic ward.

Interesting... how does the steering feel with the stem reversed? I would worry about some twitchiness.;)

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For street riding, I use the type below because they are super comfortable. Unless you're riding a mountain bike on off road trails, 90% of H-bars are designed the wrong way. Drop your hands down by your sides, then slowly raise them and see what position they're in. Then turn them to where they would be on straight bars. That throws your wrists, elbows and shoulders all out of whack. I learned a little when I worked in an orthopedic ward.
Reversed the stem?? Is that handling safe?
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
It just makes the reach really short. Will ride fine, but puts you upright as well. I like to be a little more spread out - the attack stance, with elbows out. We learned it riding dirtbikes. Your arms run into you body sooner with the bars way back.
 
This is very interesting.

I ended up getting those Jones H-Bars with 2.5" rise and just reversed the stem.

The seating position is extremely comfortable. My arms sit completely naturally.

Looking forward to tomorrow's ride.
 
For street riding, I use the type below because they are super comfortable. Unless you're riding a mountain bike on off road trails, 90% of H-bars are designed the wrong way. Drop your hands down by your sides, then slowly raise them and see what position they're in. Then turn them to where they would be on straight bars. That throws your wrists, elbows and shoulders all out of whack. I learned a little when I worked in an orthopedic ward.
I tried reversing my 60mm stem on my Jones-H bars, and the seating position was perfectly comfortable, as you said. There was zero back or shoulder pain.

The steering however was awful. Very twitchy. Seemed like an accident waiting to happen. I switched back after 5 minutes.

How is your experience with the handling?