High range requirements, health issues.. Is an ebike right for me? Which one should I get? I would love some help! :)

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I did actually mean 100 km there and 100 km back!
If that's the case, 100km is easy.

Almost any ebikes sold in Japan can do well over 100km.

In the US and Canada, the range is much shorter because of 20mph (32km/h) and 28 (45km/h) speed limit.
Japan has strict 15mph (25km/h) limit, so that's why they tend to get much longer range.

Basically, just turn the assist down. You'll get 100km easy.

Look at 3:33 in this video.
After 100km, someone had 4% battery left, but other people had nearly half left because they didn't use much assist.
 

pmcdonald

Well-Known Member
I should have worded that differently - I did mean 100 km there plus 100km back.

Whoah, okay.

A 200 km round trip is quite the ride. My 500Wh Yamaha-powered bike could just do it under windless, near-flat conditions on minimum assist with lots of leg help. Others here with similar bikes have pushed near 250 km on a charge. But this is really hypermilling territory, not what I'd call relaxed, everyday riding.

Could we trouble you for a little more context, if you're willing to share? Is this there and back in a day. If so that's a massive amount of time in the saddle (8 - 10 hours per trip). If not will you have the chance to recharge overnight? 100 km is a lot more doable that 200. As Captain Slow asked, is public transport an option to do the bulk of the distance?

If this is for the purpose of day trips I feel a moped or cheap motorcycle might be more suitable. Others here can advise on whether those are realistic options in your budget.
 

dangerface

New Member
If that's the case, 100km is easy.

Almost any ebikes sold in Japan can do well over 100km.

In the US and Canada, the range is much shorter because of 20mph (32km/h) and 28 (45km/h) speed limit.
Japan has strict 15mph (25km/h) limit, so that's why they tend to get much longer range.

Basically, just turn the assist down. You'll get 100km easy.

Look at 3:33 in this video.
After 100km, someone had 4% battery left, but other people had nearly half left because they didn't use much assist.
Any particular Japanese models you suggest?
Whoah, okay.

A 200 km round trip is quite the ride. My 500Wh Yamaha-powered bike could just do it under windless, near-flat conditions on minimum assist with lots of leg help. Others here with similar bikes have pushed near 250 km on a charge. But this is really hypermilling territory, not what I'd call relaxed, everyday riding.

Could we trouble you for a little more context, if you're willing to share? Is this there and back in a day. If so that's a massive amount of time in the saddle (8 - 10 hours per trip). If not will you have the chance to recharge overnight? 100 km is a lot more doable that 200. As Captain Slow asked, is public transport an option to do the bulk of the distance?

If this is for the purpose of day trips I feel a moped or cheap motorcycle might be more suitable. Others here can advise on whether those are realistic options in your budget.
I 'd thought about motorcycles but the insurance / not having a license of any kind are a barrier. Ideally I want to be able to do cycle touring days where I bike for the day, camp and keep going - go and visit family and that kind of thing and get to places transit doesn't go and take myself camping (where there isn't electricity). Basically I'm trying to come as close as I possibly can to what I would do with a little car with space for a mattress in the back if I could afford it. I can do pretty long rides without pain, it's really navigating hills that starts to hurt my knees/back ect and cut my energy quickly which is why the assist would help so much, but I hadn't really thought about the fact that it would take 8-10 hours to get 100 km.. I've done rides close to that long but not quite and it's definitely a lot in a day.

I've never had a vehicle of any kind besides my pedal bike and I guess I will probably need to adjust my expectations a lot.

Thanks so much to everyone helping me with this. My ADHD brain has so much trouble sorting information online and trying to compare and process details without being able to have the actual bikes right in front of me and live people to actually talk to!
 

pmcdonald

Well-Known Member
Ideally I want to be able to do cycle touring days where I bike for the day, camp and keep going - go and visit family and that kind of thing and get to places transit doesn't go and take myself camping (where there isn't electricity). Basically I'm trying to come as close as I possibly can to what I would do with a little car with space for a mattress in the back if I could afford it. I can do pretty long rides without pain, it's really navigating hills that starts to hurt my knees/back ect and cut my energy quickly which is why the assist would help so much

Ah, that info helps a lot. The touring folk here should be able to offer some advice on bikes and strategies. They're navigating similar issues (power availability vs range). Have you read through the threads below?

 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Any particular Japanese models you suggest?
For $2,500 Canadian, not really :confused: but i will post one model anyway.

It is called Yamaha YPJ EC (known as Yamaha CrossCore in the US market).
The Yamaha CrossCore is $2,399 US, I don't know how much in Canadian, but it will be over $2,500.
Also, I am not sure if it's available in Canada. You'd have to contact Yamaha.

Yamaha YPJ EC
(In the US it is known as, Yamaha CrossCore)

RANGE:
High: 89km
Standard: 109km
Eco: 148km
Eco Plus: 222km

The above range was quoted from Japanese site, although the bike is identical, Japan has strict 15mph (25km/h) regulations. Therefore, the US version will likely have less range due to increased top speed of 20mph (32km/h).
However, you can just run on lower assist mode to conserve the battery.

Yamaha YPJ EC (Japanese site) : https://www.yamaha-motor.co.jp/pas/ypj/ypj-ec/
Yamaha CrossCore (US Site) : https://www.yamahabicycles.com/bikes/crosscore/

index_bike.jpg
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Also, even if Yamaha CrossCore is not available in Canada, you can still buy Yamaha powered ebikes, which I guess will give you similar range.
 

Alex M

Well-Known Member
You want 100 km to get there, and 100 km back, 200 km total? With a stock battery you aren't going to make even 100 km one way, not in a hilly Vancouver.

Besides, 100 km one way is A LOT of riding, more than 3 hours, given Canadian 32 kmh limit for ebikes. Your ars isn't going to like it, consider taking your bike on public transit. Most buses have bike racks in front.
 
Last edited:

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
I should have worded that differently - I did mean 100 km there plus 100km back.

Thanks for the clarification on your commute. I think the Yamaha Cross Core would be a good choice with a high quality motor & battery.

Court reviewed the bike on EBR and it has a maximum rated range of 129 km in eco mode... you would be fine with 100 km in the real world.


 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
For $2,500 Canadian, not really :confused: but i will post one model anyway.

It is called Yamaha YPJ EC (known as Yamaha CrossCore in the US market).
The Yamaha CrossCore is $2,399 US, I don't know how much in Canadian, but it will be over $2,500.
Also, I am not sure if it's available in Canada. You'd have to contact Yamaha.

Yamaha YPJ EC
(In the US it is known as, Yamaha CrossCore)

RANGE:
High: 89km
Standard: 109km
Eco: 148km
Eco Plus: 222km

The above range was quoted from Japanese site, although the bike is identical, Japan has strict 15mph (25km/h) regulations. Therefore, the US version will likely have less range due to increased top speed of 20mph (32km/h).
However, you can just run on lower assist mode to conserve the battery.

Yamaha YPJ EC (Japanese site) : https://www.yamaha-motor.co.jp/pas/ypj/ypj-ec/
Yamaha CrossCore (US Site) : https://www.yamahabicycles.com/bikes/crosscore/

index_bike.jpg


Crazy Lenny has the Cross Core available for $2.399... I am sure they can do far better with a phone call. ;)


1589163817954.png
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
You want 100 km to get there, and 100 km back, 200 km total? With a stock battery you aren't going to make even 100 km one way, not in a hilly Vancouver.

Besides, 100 km one way is A LOT of riding, more than 3 hours, given Canadian 32 kmh limit for ebikes. Your ars isn't going to like it, consider taking your bike on public transit. Most buses have bike racks in front.
He already confirmed 100km total, not 200km.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Crazy Lenny has the Cross Core available for $2.399... I am sure they can do far better with a phone call. ;)


View attachment 52090
My concern is that he is from Canada.

Do they ship it to Canada? Also, he's looking for bike for $2,500 Canadian, which is $1,789 @ today's rate.

I believe Yamaha offers 3 year warranty, but is it only valid in the US?
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
I'm wondering how much throttle time you intend since you also mentioned the gas bike, and your disability. That definitely makes 200km a serious problem.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I'm wondering how much throttle time you intend since you also mentioned the gas bike, and your disability. That definitely makes 200km a serious problem.
yeah 200km is a long ride.

Even at full speed, 32km/h (20mph) it would take 6.25 hrs. But it's virtually impossible to keep the full speed for whole time.

To conserve the battery, he will be riding on Eco or Eco Plus mode.

Here's how long it would take him to cover 200kms:
Time - Average Speed
8 hours - 25km/h (15.5 mph)
10 hour - 20km/h (12.4 mph)
12 hours - 17km/h (10.5 mph)
 

dangerface

New Member
Ah, that info helps a lot. The touring folk here should be able to offer some advice on bikes and strategies. They're navigating similar issues (power availability vs range). Have you read through the threads below?

I have not! Will check'em out :) Thanks!~