Home maintenance

pmcdonald

Well-Known Member
Okay, I've been slowly building up my comfort level with some basic maintenance tasks. I now give the chain a regular clean with a cyclone type tool, I replaced a chain (broke the new replacement pin, bought a link to fix, was pretty easy mishap aside), and swapped a stem (threaded a bolt, still creaks, that'll go to the LBS to fix my botched job). (Side note, anything to get rid of creaks? My seat - a Brooks B17 - creaks a little as well but the bolts are tensioned as hard as I feel comfortable going. Graphite?)

My next mission is to swap the very, very worn front cogs, chain and cassette on an old analog bike. What do I need? I believe the cassette is an 8 speed Shimano Alivio 11-32T, and the front has three cogs of currently unknown specification but I believe it's a Shimano Alivio crankset as well.

Would I be right in thinking I need one of these for the rear cassette removal: https://www.cyclingdeal.com.au/buy/...e-install-removal-tool-chain-whip/YC-126-501? What about the front? This is unknown territory for me but I can afford to make some mistakes on this bike as a learning experience.

These are the parts I was thinking of ordering as replacements:

Chain: https://www.cyclingdeal.com.au/buy/shimano-cn-hg40-6-7-8-speed-chain/CN-HG40
Cassette: https://www.cyclingdeal.com.au/buy/shimano-acera-cs-hg41-8-speed-cassette-11-32t/CS-HG41-1132
Crankset: https://www.pushys.com.au/sunrace-fcm600-170mm-42-34-22t-8-7-speed-crankset.html (I have ZERO idea about cranksets - can I just replace the worn cogs or is it the whole package?)
 
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Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Creaks can be tough. Getting the right torque helps. Fasteners are often under tightened without a torque wrench. I also use an anti-sieze compound to help get the right torque and reduce metal to metal squeaks. This is my favorite since it's black and easy to hide; https://www.zoro.com/anti-seize-technology-heavy-duty-anti-seize-2-oz-brshtp-cn-12002/i/G2283410/ .

The cassette removal tools and cassette look OK. The chain maybe short at 112 links if the bike has an adult size frame. 116 links is more common for full size frames. It's safest to count the links on the chain you have now.

Depending on the quality of your crankset you may be able to replace individual chainrings. Entry level assemblies can have one or more chainrings stamped in place. Either way, the one you've linked is an affordable solution. The ring tooth count is fairly typical. Do they match what you have?

Do you have the tools to pull the cranks and chainrings off the bottom btacket?

Have you checked the bottom bracket? With the cranks removed the shaft should turn smoothly and freely with no rough spots. If not, this indicates bearing failure and will need to be replaced or serviced. If it's an older or less expensive bike it may have bearings in the bottom bracket that can be cleaned and greased and/or individually replaced to fix most issues. It's probably a sealed bottom bracket that is replaced as a unit.

There's yet another tool to remove the bottom bracket...😔

Does everything else look solid; brakes, wheel bearings, headset bearings, etc? It pays to check all the bearing sets when fixing up an older bike.

Park Tool's free videos are a great source of info to help with these type of repairs.

One last point, when all is said and done and you've bought the parts and tools for these repairs, will the bike be worth the investment you've made?
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Do you have the tools to pull the cranks and chainrings off the bottom btacket?
Tim, just a question: Have you already been working with the "self-extracting" cranks? It was a big surprise for my brother dismantling my Giant Trance E+. He had the ISIS crank-puller at the ready but the tool didn't fit the system. We've watched a video from Park Tools; then my brother just took the 6 mm hex wrench and started working hard on a crank. It extracted itself... :) Yet, to remove the chainring we needed a special tool to remove the Yamaha/Giant lock-ring. It is all so complicated!
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Tim, just a question: Have you already been working with the "self-extracting" cranks? It was a big surprise for my brother dismantling my Giant Trance E+. He had the ISIS crank-puller at the ready but the tool didn't fit the system. We've watched a video from Park Tools; then my brother just took the 6 mm hex wrench and started working hard on a crank. It extracted itself... :) Yet, to remove the chainring we needed a special tool to remove the Yamaha/Giant lock-ring. It is all so complicated!
All of my bikes have always had the squate tapered crank shaft that requires a crank puller. My sons' have the splined cranks that you can remove by hand. They tell me there's a weight advantage, but hey ebkies so don't care too much...😉

For such seemingly simple machines, there are lots of special tools...🙄...and they change over time! Your LBS probably has drawers full of tools just for high quality but much older bikes!
 

Latitude

Active Member
Having done lots of research I have decided to concentrate my home repairs on the tires, chain and cassette... things that wear most. I really enjoy getting to know the equipment I play and work with, whether sailing, woodworking or biking among others. I am putting about 250 km a week on my e bike, and am well over an hour’s drive from my busy Trek dealer, so the prospect of doing my most-needed maintenance and repairs at home appeals to me. So the tools I have added here are:
Crank Brothers multi tool and other hex tools for home
Tire repair kit... spare tubes, c02, levers, mini pump with psi gauge, will add Stan’s
Chain... I now have a spare and quick links as well as a trail and HD Park shop chain pin tool
Park dummy rear hub
Pro Tools torque socket set
Park tools for cassette removal... long handle versions
Park chain cleaner and cassette cleaner devices/brushes
Cleaner, degreaser, chain lube and waterproof grease
Feeling like I am somewhat in control now.
 

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