How do you get onto your high-step mid-motor e-bikes?

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
When I was in my thirties (back in early 1990s), I owned a steel road bike. I used to mount the bike as a man mounts a horse: Step onto the pedal with the left foot (I used clips at that time), press the body weight to make the crank spin -- the bike was on the move immediately -- then throw the other leg over the saddle and off you go!

However, user manuals for mid-drive motor e-bikes explicitly forbid such a technique. The reason is, the torque sensor activates the motor when you step onto the pedal. That makes the e-bike ride at high acceleration and might mean an accident. The manuals also recommend you press your brake lever before you ride (the brake lever cuts off the power from the motor).

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So, how do you get onto your high-step e-bikes?

I must admit that when I returned to cycling in 2013, all my bikes have been step-through since (I'd love a true low-step bike...) because I'm not agile anymore and my legs became surprisingly heavy, To mount the bike, I engage a brake, lean the bike towards me, throw my free leg over the lower part of the "top" tube. When I stand in the cockpit (as to say) I can place my foot on the pedal and ride, jumping onto the saddle meanwhile. How could I mount a high-step e-bike remains a mystery to me.
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
I gave up on high step bikes in 2014 and went flat foot/crank forward. 4, 3-KHS and 1-Trek Pure still being ridden. Newest projects were Zizzo folder and Marin Step-through Hybrid frame.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
I did the left foot on the pedal, short push with the right, then swing your right leg over (forget what they call that style mount, but there is a name for it) when younger too. Now, I can't bring myself to trust my balance enough to even try that move.

Now, it's right pedal down with the bike leaned to the left (toward me), grab the front brake so the bike won't move (allowing me to use it to steady myself), swing the right leg over the seat and place the right foot on the right pedal, then a light push with the left foot to straighten the bike, while applying just a touch of throttle to get the bike moving while getting my balance. Throttle not used often when underway, but this is the reason I won't own a bike without one. -Al
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Although at 73, I still ride my high barTrek MTB's, I'm finding it more and more difficult to mount them. Now, I tilt the bike sideways while holding a brake lever, throw my leg over the bar and step sideways while pulling the bike upright under me. Then, straddling the bike with both feet on the ground, I put the crank in the 9 /3 o'clock position, stand on the left pedal and hoist myself up onto the seat as the bike moves forward. I think it takes longer to read this instruction than to actually do it since it becomes a matter of habit. I used this same technique during many test rides when ebike shopping.

Realizing this was going to become increasingly difficult in the future, I switched to a step thru design when I bought my first ebike. I keep the seat a bit lower than normal so I can stop and start with my feet on the ground. The motor overcomes the loss of pedaling efficiency and for me, this lower position reduces back pain and arm fatigue.
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
On large 700c wheels I tried holding the bike at a 45 degree angle then throw leg over the rear but I found panniers kept getting in the way so bought a step through. I also ride a men's Raleigh Sports pedal bike because with 26" wheels it's low enough I can still throw a leg over it.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Realizing this was going to become increasingly difficult in the future, I switched to a step thru design when I bought my first ebike. I keep the seat a bit lower than normal so I can stop and start with my feet on the ground.
Because of pretty high saddle position in my e-bikes, I experience even more difficulty while dismounting than mounting. I don't want to lower the saddle because I feel weird with my knees bent too much. A dropper seat-post would be fine but installing it feels quite difficult to me.
 

Rick53

Active Member
When I was in my thirties (back in early 1990s), I owned a steel road bike. I used to mount the bike as a man mounts a horse: Step onto the pedal with the left foot (I used clips at that time), press the body weight to make the crank spin -- the bike was on the move immediately -- then throw the other leg over the saddle and off you go!

However, user manuals for mid-drive motor e-bikes explicitly forbid such a technique. The reason is, the torque sensor activates the motor when you step onto the pedal. That makes the e-bike ride at high acceleration and might mean an accident. The manuals also recommend you press your brake lever before you ride (the brake lever cuts off the power from the motor).

View attachment 45918

So, how do you get onto your high-step e-bikes?

I must admit that when I returned to cycling in 2013, all my bikes have been step-through since (I'd love a true low-step bike...) because I'm not agile anymore and my legs became surprisingly heavy, To mount the bike, I engage a brake, lean the bike towards me, throw my free leg over the lower part of the "top" tube. When I stand in the cockpit (as to say) I can place my foot on the pedal and ride, jumping onto the saddle meanwhile. How could I mount a high-step e-bike remains a mystery to me.
have you ever tried to lift your leg up to table ht and set it on the table > Then stand that way for 60 seconds . Then switch sides ? Works wonders : I'm 64 : When I started to ride bikes again after 35 years of not. I was even afraid to go no handed : Once I overcame my fear of letting go and made the commitment : It was just as easy as it ever was Just a suggestion My point is unless you've had hip replacement or need one. There's usually no reason you can't get you flexibility and coordination bake> I also do lunges and squats every other day
 

BillH

Active Member
I'm 59. I also grew weary and tired of the high-step bikes I was accustomed too my whole life and exactly why when it came time for my first ebike purchase I went with a step-thru frame. I chose an Evelo Aurora Fully Loaded. Best decision ever.

As for my eMTB I went with a small frame which is low enough I can step over the frame easily enough. I sized up on the dropper seat post extension length since I tend to ride with minimal knee bend.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
This is my technique and possibly other people are using it as well.

Mount:

0) Gearing in 52 /21 or lower( 48/17, etc...

- Both hands on the handlebars

1)Place Left leg about 20-30 cm to the left of the crank

2) Tilt ebike to the left about 15-30degrees.

3) Throw right leg over the Top tube and place it on the pavement not on the pedal*

4) Bring both feet close to the crank

5) Place either crank arm (R Or L) at 6 o ' clock position

6) With Ebike in eco mode or throttle , place one feet on the 6 o'clock pedal, place the other one on the 12 o'clock pedal position engage it and start pedaling with other leg also😉.
If you use throttle , start to pedal after the ebike gets up to speed or sooner.


Is imp. to start with the right gearing and in the right mode(eco/sport) .



Dismounting is easier but will write it later in the evening.


* If you are an advanced rider can start in Turbo mode , Throw Leg over top tube and start pedalling.
 
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PaD

Well-Known Member
I’m 5’ 8”. Vado 5.0, men’s frame M.
1) I stand on left side of the bike. Both hand on handlebars. Weight on my left foot and then swing my right leg foorward and over the top tube. Just for the show😄
Don’t do this if you have a stiff day. If your heel hits the top tube it’s going to be a mess.

2) I stand on right side of the bike with both hands on handlebars. Put my right foot on the pedal and get the bike going and at the same time swing my left leg backwrds over rear rack and seat.
caution, rear bags can be in the way.

Remember, I’m only 68.6
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
I do it the 'forbidden way' about half the time. The rest of the time I throw a leg over the saddle.
In pas-1 it doesn't accelerate wildly, just a non-issue. 😇

I ignore all warning stickers on everything, and will usually remove them if possible. I'm a rebel. And I really should be dead by now. 🤣
 

PaD

Well-Known Member
I do it the 'forbidden way' about half the time. The rest of the time I throw a leg over the saddle.
In pas-1 it doesn't accelerate wildly, just a non-issue. 😇

I ignore all warning stickers on everything, and will usually remove them if possible. I'm a rebel. And I really should be dead by now. 🤣
Forbidden fruit is the best
 

Bicyclista

Active Member
I do it the forbidden way all the time. I've been mounting that way for 65 years. My Yamaha motor provides full torque the moment you press lightly on the pedals, so I restrain my horse by pulling on the brakes. The trick is to release the brakes just as you are swinging your leg over the back wheel (and, in my case, avoiding rack and panniers). I've never had a crash doing it this way in 65 years. No, I did not read the manual.
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
+1 for dropper seat posts.
As far as I can understand, installing the dropper seat post requires setting up yet another cable and finding space on the handlebars for the lever, true? It looks it is hard to do it for an inexperienced user. Leave the work to be done by the LBS?