How I go shopping on the Brompton eBike

I've had my Brompton M6R for a year now - I ditched my car and I use the bike to go shopping in town. I'm 73 and I really enjoy riding it. I like the exercise the bike gives me and that it folds so small I can take it Inside all the shops , either in its own 'trolley mode' or folded inside a supermarket trolley. There's no risk of it ever getting stolen as it never leaves me. I'm not so happy that it is really quite heavy and wouldn't relish having to struggle with it in the underground/subway/metro. Also, I don't find it 'oomphy' enough to get me up the steepest hills, so I have to walk those. Note that at 73, I'm not prepared to over-exert myself up very steep hills. I would say that if you have any hills in your home town, you definitely need to buy the 6-gear version - like mine. On flat ground and moderate hills, you'll sail along, no problem, with the electric assistance.

Despite the negatives, the Brompton eBike suits my 'getting-around-town' purpose admirably. I carry my shopping in 3 places:

On the back of the bike, I have the Brompton Eazy Wheels rear rack fitted and onto that I strap a narrow wire basket from my chest freezer, (note that, as you pedal, you'll hit anything on the back that is too wide, with your heels). I did buy the Brompton Rack Sack but the freezer basket with an insulated shopping bag inside is much more useful for shopping.

On the front of the bike I clip the large size Brompton City Bag. There's not a lot of room in that bag , given that it also houses the battery, but it's good for things you don't want to crush - like eggs , for example and the pockets hold my purse and phone so, it's all nicely organised.

On my back , I wear a very lightweight backpack. which carries quite a considerable amount of shopping.

You can shop with the bike semi folded in 'trolley' mode but I worry that that's putting too much strain on the bike for anything but lightweight shopping, like going in the bank or the chemist, etc. if I use the bike like that, I hook my freezer basket over the handlebars with two loops I made. For shopping at the supermarket, I fold the bike up completely and put it Inside the supermarket trolley. See the attached photos. If my supermarket had trolleys with a shelf underneath, that'd probably be even better - I'd lay the bike on its side on bubble wrap.

You have to be careful not to buy too many heavy things at once, for fear of exceeding the recommended loads for the bike and you'll need to go shopping a bit more often than with a car, as you can only buy what you can actually carry, but the ride is fun, it's pollution free and great exercise.
 

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PDXzap

Active Member
Good job! Nice engineering work placing the freezer basket on the back or the rear of the bike.
 

Riverwave

New Member
I've had my Brompton M6R for a year now - I ditched my car and I use the bike to go shopping in town. I'm 73 and I really enjoy riding it. I like the exercise the bike gives me and that it folds so small I can take it Inside all the shops , either in its own 'trolley mode' or folded inside a supermarket trolley. There's no risk of it ever getting stolen as it never leaves me. I'm not so happy that it is really quite heavy and wouldn't relish having to struggle with it in the underground/subway/metro. Also, I don't find it 'oomphy' enough to get me up the steepest hills, so I have to walk those. Note that at 73, I'm not prepared to over-exert myself up very steep hills. I would say that if you have any hills in your home town, you definitely need to buy the 6-gear version - like mine. On flat ground and moderate hills, you'll sail along, no problem, with the electric assistance.

Despite the negatives, the Brompton eBike suits my 'getting-around-town' purpose admirably. I carry my shopping in 3 places:

On the back of the bike, I have the Brompton Eazy Wheels rear rack fitted and onto that I strap a narrow wire basket from my chest freezer, (note that, as you pedal, you'll hit anything on the back that is too wide, with your heels). I did buy the Brompton Rack Sack but the freezer basket with an insulated shopping bag inside is much more useful for shopping.

On the front of the bike I clip the large size Brompton City Bag. There's not a lot of room in that bag , given that it also houses the battery, but it's good for things you don't want to crush - like eggs , for example and the pockets hold my purse and phone so, it's all nicely organised.

On my back , I wear a very lightweight backpack. which carries quite a considerable amount of shopping.

You can shop with the bike semi folded in 'trolley' mode but I worry that that's putting too much strain on the bike for anything but lightweight shopping, like going in the bank or the chemist, etc. if I use the bike like that, I hook my freezer basket over the handlebars with two loops I made. For shopping at the supermarket, I fold the bike up completely and put it Inside the supermarket trolley. See the attached photos. If my supermarket had trolleys with a shelf underneath, that'd probably be even better - I'd lay the bike on its side on bubble wrap.

You have to be careful not to buy too many heavy things at once, for fear of exceeding the recommended loads for the bike and you'll need to go shopping a bit more often than with a car, as you can only buy what you can actually carry, but the ride is fun, it's pollution free and great exercise.
I've had my Brompton M6R for a year now - I ditched my car and I use the bike to go shopping in town. I'm 73 and I really enjoy riding it. I like the exercise the bike gives me and that it folds so small I can take it Inside all the shops , either in its own 'trolley mode' or folded inside a supermarket trolley. There's no risk of it ever getting stolen as it never leaves me. I'm not so happy that it is really quite heavy and wouldn't relish having to struggle with it in the underground/subway/metro. Also, I don't find it 'oomphy' enough to get me up the steepest hills, so I have to walk those. Note that at 73, I'm not prepared to over-exert myself up very steep hills. I would say that if you have any hills in your home town, you definitely need to buy the 6-gear version - like mine. On flat ground and moderate hills, you'll sail along, no problem, with the electric assistance.

Despite the negatives, the Brompton eBike suits my 'getting-around-town' purpose admirably. I carry my shopping in 3 places:

On the back of the bike, I have the Brompton Eazy Wheels rear rack fitted and onto that I strap a narrow wire basket from my chest freezer, (note that, as you pedal, you'll hit anything on the back that is too wide, with your heels). I did buy the Brompton Rack Sack but the freezer basket with an insulated shopping bag inside is much more useful for shopping.

On the front of the bike I clip the large size Brompton City Bag. There's not a lot of room in that bag , given that it also houses the battery, but it's good for things you don't want to crush - like eggs , for example and the pockets hold my purse and phone so, it's all nicely organised.

On my back , I wear a very lightweight backpack. which carries quite a considerable amount of shopping.

You can shop with the bike semi folded in 'trolley' mode but I worry that that's putting too much strain on the bike for anything but lightweight shopping, like going in the bank or the chemist, etc. if I use the bike like that, I hook my freezer basket over the handlebars with two loops I made. For shopping at the supermarket, I fold the bike up completely and put it Inside the supermarket trolley. See the attached photos. If my supermarket had trolleys with a shelf underneath, that'd probably be even better - I'd lay the bike on its side on bubble wrap.

You have to be careful not to buy too many heavy things at once, for fear of exceeding the recommended loads for the bike and you'll need to go shopping a bit more often than with a car, as you can only buy what you can actually carry, but the ride is fun, it's pollution free and great exercise.
Great report thanks! I have an Electric H6R but mine is fitted with the -12% lower gearing which has definitely made all the difference climbing inclines of 20% or more; the downside of course is that my top speed on down slopes is limited to how fast I can pedal! Have you tried turning your freezer basket through 90 degrees so it overhangs to left and right? I wondered whether that would stop the problem of heel strike while retaining balance?
On holiday I put a large ruck sack on the rack, and I hang its straps from a short piece of bamboo cane which I suspend from the saddle with two rubber O rings ftom a plumber (cost 30p each). A bungy strap wrapped around the ruck sack’s straps stops them from slipping off the bamboo rod.
Peter