How Important Is It To Choose A Dealer Close To Your Home?

Jim1348

New Member
I am new to the forum and I will keep watching the other posts here about how to select an e-bike, but right now I am just wondering how important people here think it is to buy from a dealer that is located close to your home. Someone has suggested that I look at Bintelli M1 Fat Tire Electric Bikes. The dealer of those closest to me is over 40 miles away. There are any number of other dealers much closer to me that carry e-bikes, but they aren't Bintelli brand.

For a one time purchase, I would have no problem traveling 40 miles to buy something like that. But, if the nature of an e-bike is going to require frequent maintenance, then I would probably prefer to buy something closer to my home.


(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)
 

Alex M

Well-Known Member
There are any number of other dealers much closer to me that carry e-bikes, but they aren't Bintelli brand.
For a one time purchase, I would have no problem traveling 40 miles to buy something like that. But, if the nature of an e-bike is going to require frequent maintenance, then I would probably prefer to buy something closer to my home.
More important is to buy a bike that fits your needs and has a reliable track record.

This is just a shop servicing what they're selling. It's a Chinese bike, completely designed and made there. Frame looks generic (aren't they all these days? :) ), parts are cheapish. They've been making gas scooters for years, quality as an average Chinese scooter. Well, at least they will fix your bike when it brakes, Walmart won't.

Nothing special, when I look at the specs. Battery on the smaller side. If you think you need a fat tire and there are many other shops closer, look into better known brands.

No, it is not "a nature of an ebike" to require frequent maintenance. If it does, it's a poorly made one. You will still need annual tune-up with any bike and some TLC here and there - chain, tire pressure, spokes, grease on electric connectors etc.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Jim, I would share that how close this dealer is, or even if you want to buy through a dealer (vs. going direct), will depend largely on your interest in maintaining the bike yourself. DIY'ers tend to do well as long as they aren't to timid to ask questions. Of course it helps when you have a few tools and a place to work as well.
 

Jim1348

New Member
Ecofun is over 40 miles from me. It we probably be a 45 minute drive or more. Now that I know there is nothing that special about the Bintelli, I will look at shops closer to where I live.


The places closest to me are:






Between those four shops, I should be able to find something suitable for me!
 

Alex M

Well-Known Member
If you're budget-minded, and have decided on a fat tire, I would suggest asking around if some shop would service Juiced Bikes. Or if independent mobile service covers your area - there is Velofix and another one, forgot the name.

Juiced Rip Current costs $300 more than Bintelli, has much bigger battery (670WH vs 500), suspension fork, hydraulic brakes - and a decent track record. The motor is (I think) the same.

Juiced is a consumer-direct bike, you won't find it at dealers, this is how they keep prices low. Not that Juiced is the only one, there are other consumer-direct brands as well. Apples to apples, a brand with extensive dealers network will cost more than consumer-direct. Aventon have managed to shrink the gap - they have many dealers and yet cost like a consumer-direct, though they don't have fat models.

No affiliation with either brand.
 
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PatriciaK

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Pacific Northwest and Piedmont Triad
Whatever you intend to buy, if you want to buy direct, contact your area LBS's and ask them if they'll service it, and how much they charge. That way, you'll know what you're getting into before you buy.
 

Jim1348

New Member
My wife had me bring her up to a shop near me to pick up a couple of other bikes that we had repaired. This sign was posted on the door.




Things Are Not Normal Here.jpg
 

Alex M

Well-Known Member
You didn't know?
Most bikes sold in the US are made in China these days. All factories there were closed for 2 months. This is how they've managed to (almost) get rid of coronavirus and I fully understand them.

I think the line about "global bike buying frenzy" is a BS. The real reason is that supply chain was disrupted, now there are delays to get a new bike or parts.