How long do Giant batteries live?

gizmoboy

New Member
Region
USA
I'm thinking about getting a used e-bike for my wife (maybe a Giant Lafree E+1), but I'm not sure how to think about the lifespan of the batteries on one of these bikes.

When I do some basic googling, I seem to find "they live 3-5 years" and the E+1 (for example) is a 3-4 year old bike.

Would I be staring down the barrel of buying a new battery for it right after purchase -- and does Momentum even support the old Giant Lafrees?

I've reached out to Momentum, but no response yet...
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
The effective lifespan of any ebike battery depends on many factors. The quality of the cells used and how well it has been maintained are key. Unfortunately, this information is often difficult to obtain for a used bike.

Batteries can last significantly longer than 3 - 5 years. FWIW, I have several 4 year old ebike batteries that bench tests indicate have lost 8 - 10% of their original capacity. All have over 100 charge cycles. When not in use, they have been stored at temps between 55 and 80 degrees with a 40 - 60% charge level. I charge them to 100% just before using and rarely discharge below 20%. I expect I'll get another 3 years out of them.

Unfortunately, you have no way of knowing how the Giant battery was treated. If the price of the bike plus the cost of a new or rebuilt battery is less than purchasing a new bike, it may be worth it. A lot however, depends on the overall condition of the bike itself. If you buy from a dealer, there may be a warranty but if it's a private sale, you're on your own.

Keep in mind, aftermarket batteries should be available for a bike as common as the Giant Lafree. There are also places that rebuild batteries with new cells.

Welcome to the forum and good luck!
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
Buying an e-bike with an old battery is not the smartest decision as:
  • You never know how the e-bike was used and how the battery was used
  • It is difficult to determine the battery status for most of e-bikes.
I am the first owner of a specific e-bike. The first battery was activated on Nov 1st 2019.

1674740531463.png

I am in the position to be able to measure the exact status of my batteries. Each of these batteries shall be 604 Wh freshly after the activation. Neither of them was with the "black" battery being the most hopeless, and the "blue" battery coming next.

How comes a 604 Wh battery (nominal) with health of 99% can only hold 533 Wh remains a mystery to me.
 
Last edited:

gizmoboy

New Member
Region
USA
Thanks for the feedback -- it does make purchasing a used bike more daunting unless I assume that I will need to replace the battery and factor that into the price.
 

pmcdonald

Well-Known Member
Could be fine but 4 years is getting on to middle age for an ebike.

I purchased a used 4 year old ebike a few years back. Battery was at 80% health. It degraded quickly after that. What did that bike in was the lack of dealer support with a motor issue that cropped up 12 months into ownership. I wish I just bought a lower spec new bike - I'd likely still be riding it 4 years on.

Might be worth contacting your nearest Giant dealer and asking if they still support the electronics if something goes bad. Won't be cheap if you have to replace the battery or motor (think $1k each, if they can even be sourced these days) but beats having a bulky doorstop lying around.

The La Free should connect to the Giant RideControl app. When inspecting the bike you could connect and view the stats. It reports the odometer, number of charge cycles and (most important) battery health. This is expressed as a percentage. Mid to high 90's is good, 70's or 80's is a bit worrying. My 3 year old Giant Explore battery health fluctuates from 96 - 93%.