How many miles do you get on your RadRover/Radwagon?

Barkme Wolf

Active Member
Radwagon- Flat, full throttle no pedal, about 20 miles.
With hills (see pic)- Assist level 2 max 30 miles. Assist level 3 max 19 miles.
I have a 20 mile commute. Last summer I rode with assist 2 for about 6 months and had a full bar left.
Now I use assist 3 and have to change to my spare battery at about 18 miles depending on head wind and atmospheric temperature.
It seems to lose a mile or two depending on temp.
Assist level 3 makes some of the hills manageable.

Not sure this information is applicable because they have updated the firmware on the controller and the assist levels are managed in a different format. For mine the assist levels manage the power output but I think the new ones get you to a certain speed and then power down when you exceed that speed. As long as I am pedaling and traveling under 20 mph, the motor is always running. In power assist 3 my power output maxes out at about 530 watts and that is on steep hills.

bike trail.jpg
 

BVC

Active Member
At the camp site I did many trips to/from the public restroom. I also did many random trips on the beach because..sand and fat tires = fun.

I got 18 miles out of 2/3 the battery, throttle only.

I usually with ease do about 10 miles with still a full battery gauge when I half ass pedal. Battery life is fantastic. Just like a car = fuel can only go so far. Don't expect it to get you from west coast to east coast on a single charge!
 

Barkme Wolf

Active Member
At the camp site I did many trips to/from the public restroom. I also did many random trips on the beach because..sand and fat tires = fun.

I got 18 miles out of 2/3 the battery, throttle only.

I usually with ease do about 10 miles with still a full battery gauge when I half ass pedal. Battery life is fantastic. Just like a car = fuel can only go so far. Don't expect it to get you from west coast to east coast on a single charge!
Unlike a car, "refueling" takes 4 hours on a empty battery.
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
I have around 2000 miles between my two Radrovers and I use mostly commuting to work 13 miles roundtrip. I purchased another charger to leave a work and top off in the morning. If the weather is nice, I sometimes take a detour to ride the paved bike trails, hard-packed, and/or single track trails near the river before heading home. I sometimes put 17-25 miles on the RR on those rides on a single charge with no blinking bar on LCD when I get home. I try to keep the tires at 20 PSI and PAS level between 2 or 3 for efficiency. It is always windy and my commute takes me from 5400 ft at my house down to 4900 ft to work. I'm 270lbs and I once weight my RR on the bathroom digital scale and it was 380 lbs (winter commuting gear, bike, lunch, work cloths, spare battery, bike tools, bike accessories).

Depending on the headwind and incline(s), I can go around 22-27 miles with the PAS around 2 or 3. The furthest I've gone on a single charge was 36 miles at PAS 2 only with my mph around 11-13 mph (old controller programming, level ground, zero wind, good amount of leg power).

I've noticed my battery level drops almost instantly to 4 bars when I get a few blocks down the road. I think the LCD screen is showing my load instead of my battery level (PAS 3-4 when trying to fight a strong headwind/incline). I can stay at 1-2 bars on the screen for a long time before I get the blinking bar.

I'm lucky to have a place to store my RR indoors at work to recharge and have my wife's spare battery to 2X my range if the weather is extremely cold or windy. I don't ride when it is extremely windy because I use 4 bars of power trying to ride the 6.5 miles home when it is +20 mph headwind with gust +25 mph.
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
i dont have as much time in on my radmini as the rover but have gotten 35-40 miles on the mini a few times

probably have 1400 miles on the rover now and i always get 40- 50 miles on my battery and this is always with 1-2 bars left
but am almost always in the flats, on good pavement and was running my tires more at 25-30 psi- have changed that and am trying 20psi because of the way the tires are wearing

get a little less mileage on gravel road rides
it is rare for the first bar to go down on my battery before 20-25 miles

mine has the controller that is controlled watts and cuts out completely when it reaches a certain speed
so level 2 cuts out at 7.5-8 mph, if i can maintain 8.5-9 etc i am peddling with no power until i hit an uphill slope

level 3 cuts out at 13.5-14 mph and once i get it to speed and can maintain 14-15 then not using any power

it is very rare for my bikes to be over 15mph unless going down a hill where it may hit 18mph for a minute - obviously under no power

think my rover has seen level 4 twice in its lifetime and never level 5

so i probably ride slower than most of you
 

Lost

Active Member
Never level 5?
Dang, I beat on mine like it owes me money sometimes!
One of my favorite quick rides: I live a mile away from a park on a big lake. I work ver weird and varied hours. I'll grab a beer and pedal to my favorite bench seat on the shore at 2am. Full tilt the whole way there so the beer won't get too warm!
 

vincent

Well-Known Member
Lol, i dont ride fast

14-15 mph seems plenty fast riding on the bike path here with the walkers etc, sometimes seems too fast- and level 3 does that fine

Of course a lot of the road bikers go much faster on there but i think it is a bad idea

So much of my riding is flat, if there were long slopes or hills sure i would use the higher levels and more battery
 

windmill

Active Member
800 miles on my wagon since I got it in February.

My daily commute is 16 miles round trip and has major hills, I use mostly PAS 3 except for a block long 20% hill where I use PAS 5. I usually have 2 bars left.
I've done 60 miles using PAS 1 and 2 on modest terrain and had 3 bars left. A lot depends on what power level is used, and how much one pedals.
 

Kingsinger

Member
Radwagon- Flat, full throttle no pedal, about 20 miles.
With hills (see pic)- Assist level 2 max 30 miles. Assist level 3 max 19 miles.
I have a 20 mile commute. Last summer I rode with assist 2 for about 6 months and had a full bar left.
Now I use assist 3 and have to change to my spare battery at about 18 miles depending on head wind and atmospheric temperature.
It seems to lose a mile or two depending on temp.
Assist level 3 makes some of the hills manageable.

Not sure this information is applicable because they have updated the firmware on the controller and the assist levels are managed in a different format. For mine the assist levels manage the power output but I think the new ones get you to a certain speed and then power down when you exceed that speed. As long as I am pedaling and traveling under 20 mph, the motor is always running. In power assist 3 my power output maxes out at about 530 watts and that is on steep hills.
How long does it typically take you to ride that 20 miles? I'm assuming that slope is from Google Maps and that it assumes a slower average speed that you achieve on the Wagon. Or is that assumption wrong? I suspect you've told us that info in a different thread, but I've forgotten. Sorry.
 

Barkme Wolf

Active Member
Today I did the trip in 1:30- Not counting my mid-ride coffee break and last battery switch (at about 18 miles in assist 3). No wind or rain today so it was optimal. I made sure to stay on track today to get you a good average. Most of the time I stop to pet dogs, watch eagles, pick up chunks of metal from the roadway, berate dangerous drivers and anything else that catches my attention.
I also use my throttle more than most people claim to. If I need just a bit of go, in a case where I might turn the crank once or twice just to keep up speed or maintain balance, I will tap the throttle. I also speed into turns which is often more effective to do with the throttle rather than cranking it out. Because of this is is also difficult to measure my power usage. I would likely get a mile or two more with my throttle off. The headlight also seems to drain a bit. I tend to have as many lights on as possible, day or night.
FWIW, I'm in the same area, and my real world average speed is typically between 14 and 15 mph.
If you are on the Facebook, I moderate a group for E bike riders in the area. https://www.facebook.com/groups/1021009017968516/
 

Barkme Wolf

Active Member
Today I did the trip in 1:30- Not counting my mid-ride coffee break and last battery switch (at about 18 miles in assist 3). No wind or rain today so it was optimal. I made sure to stay on track today to get you a good average. Most of the time I stop to pet dogs, watch eagles, pick up chunks of metal from the roadway, berate dangerous drivers and anything else that catches my attention.
I also use my throttle more than most people claim to. If I need just a bit of go, in a case where I might turn the crank once or twice just to keep up speed or maintain balance, I will tap the throttle. I also speed into turns which is often more effective to do with the throttle rather than cranking it out. Because of this is is also difficult to measure my power usage. I would likely get a mile or two more with my throttle off. The headlight also seems to drain a bit. I tend to have as many lights on as possible, day or night.

If you are on the Facebook, I moderate a group for E bike riders in the area. https://www.facebook.com/groups/1021009017968516/
Did I already tell you this? I may have-
 

Tom Kriek

New Member
Certainly depends on weight, like YOUR weight. I am 245 and I can comfortably get 30 miles mixed flat/slightly hilly. I generally use mostly Assist 2 going and use more 3 coming back. But now that I reprogrammed max speed to 27 kl/hr, I haven't tested the range, but because Assist 3 is using less watts, I think it I will probably get a little more. Really depends on terrain, total weight, etc., which is why manufacturers are almost hesitant to list it because it is so variable, which is what you are seeing here.
 

Barkme Wolf

Active Member
UPDATE: For the last week I have been getting nearly the full 20 miles on a single battery, likely due to warmer weather.
This is a 4 mile increase from 4 weeks ago when I started riding in the rain and cold.
I assume it is the weather. The only other factor is that they batteries had come out from several months in storage.
If it takes time after storing a battery for it to get back to full out put I would not be surprised but I am not aware of this as a fact.
 

Kingsinger

Member
Today I did the trip in 1:30-
Thanks. So your trip was about 1.45 times faster than the Google Maps Bike directions (average speed of around 13.73 mph vs. Google Maps directions, which assume average speed of 9.5 mph).

Just trying to understand how an electric bike might affect travel times vis a vis the the projected bike travel times in the Google Maps directions (which tend to assume an average speed under 10 mph).

For example, a transit trip from Seattle's Beacon Hill Station to Neumos in the Capitol Hill neighborhood is estimated at 23 minutes during the middle of the afternoon. Google bike directions estimate 19 minutes (average speed of 8.25 mph). So if we assume that the electric bike trip would be 1.45 times faster than the Google directions, then we're looking at an estimated travel time of 13 minutes, which is the same travel time estimate as making this trip in a car.

Beacon Hill Station to the Hotel Albatross on Market Street in Ballard is 53 minutes in the middle of the day. Biking directions also estimate 53 minutes. So if we assume that electric bike would be 1.45 times faster than Google bike estimate, we get 36.6 minutes. Car estimate is 24 minutes. So car is definitely the fastest option, at least this time of day, but the electric bike cuts bike travel time down to the point where it's much more competitive with the car and significantly faster than taking transit. Moreover, I suspect the travel time for the bike isn't affected by traffic in the same way that the car trip is. So at rush hour, the car and electric bike times may well be about the same. I know from experience that it's usually going to take more than 30 minutes to get from Beacon Hill to Ballard once the traffic thickens up.

Anyway, mostly just thinking out loud here. I suspect you folks have already thought most of this stuff through.
 

Barkme Wolf

Active Member
So, I have managed to figure out why I get more power on the way to work than I do on the way home even though the way to work is "up hill".
It was kind of hard for me to wrap my head around but I think it goes like this-
The last 3 miles on my way to... is a series of small hills, so I recuperate power as I go. The last mile is all down hill or flatish-
On the way home, most of my "down hill runs" are at the beginning of the ride so any power I regen' goes into a full battery.
The last mile to my house is a straight climb. If I do not change the battery by the bottom of the climb, it will shut off the assist.
Once I get to the top of the climb, assist kicks in for the short downhill run the rest of the way.
Seems although the battery has power in it, it is not enough to do a relentless lift up a 20% hill without having a chance to regenerate some power.
Unfortunately, electrical engineering is not my forte so this is all guess work for me.
 

Molly

New Member
Hello,
Radwagon- Flat, full throttle no pedal, about 20 miles.
With hills (see pic)- Assist level 2 max 30 miles. Assist level 3 max 19 miles.
I have a 20 mile commute. Last summer I rode with assist 2 for about 6 months and had a full bar left.
Now I use assist 3 and have to change to my spare battery at about 18 miles depending on head wind and atmospheric temperature.
It seems to lose a mile or two depending on temp.
Assist level 3 makes some of the hills manageable.

Not sure this information is applicable because they have updated the firmware on the controller and the assist levels are managed in a different format. For mine the assist levels manage the power output but I think the new ones get you to a certain speed and then power down when you exceed that speed. As long as I am pedaling and traveling under 20 mph, the motor is always running. In power assist 3 my power output maxes out at about 530 watts and that is on steep hills.

View attachment 16170
I'm thinking of buying myself a Radwagon very soon but was wondering if one can pedal the bike without the assist of motor so that I can get a bit of a workout on the way home from work? Thank you!