How much taller can one get?

MLB

Well-Known Member
With the handlebar riser. ;)
I'd like to bring them up a bit and maybe a bit swept back, but don't want to have to mess with replacing cables if at all possible.
 

GW Shark

Member
I had talked to a fitter regarding the headset and geometry and changing this on another bike other than a Stromer. It was my FSR Epic Comp 29er Specialized and he shared with me that yes you can add stem extensions and other pieces to change your seating and geometry but you must be careful as to the bars and risers used as this changes the leverage that is exerted on the headset. Two totally different bikes I get it, but the principle is the same. Change the engineering with some add ons and you can change things other than your comfort, that being the safety the bike was designed to operate in. It is obvious I am not an engineer!
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
Certainly, but within the constraints of using the stock cables you're talking about a minor move. Of course he's correct to a degree, but then non one should ever modify anything and in fact that is how many products get improved.
I've been modifying motorcycles and cars for many years and I wouldn't alter things dramatically on any of them.
That said, raising the bars a couple of inches isn't really changing the "load" as much as the height and weight variations different riders would affect within an "normal" size range.
 

DWEBiker

Active Member
(Link Removed - No Longer Exists) Im not a member of the Stromer club but i raised mine 4.6 inches with this by Delta
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
I had talked to a fitter regarding the headset and geometry and changing this on another bike other than a Stromer. It was my FSR Epic Comp 29er Specialized and he shared with me that yes you can add stem extensions and other pieces to change your seating and geometry but you must be careful as to the bars and risers used as this changes the leverage that is exerted on the headset. Two totally different bikes I get it, but the principle is the same. Change the engineering with some add ons and you can change things other than your comfort, that being the safety the bike was designed to operate in. It is obvious I am not an engineer!

I think you explained very well. Important to get a bike with a frame and geometry that fits you!
 

GW Shark

Member
Certainly, but within the constraints of using the stock cables you're talking about a minor move. Of course he's correct to a degree, but then non one should ever modify anything and in fact that is how many products get improved.
I've been modifying motorcycles and cars for many years and I wouldn't alter things dramatically on any of them.
That said, raising the bars a couple of inches isn't really changing the "load" as much as the height and weight variations different riders would affect within an "normal" size range.
His concern was the type of riding condition and going down a hill with a higher center of gravity and pressure at a new point on the stem and hitting something.

There is usually the conservative view( Safety), the engineered view (What the numbers say for maximum efficiency) and the realistic view ( How it plays out in real time) Sometimes these are all very similar, but usually not.

I swim with the sharks and people think that is crazy, but you got to know your limitations, right!
 

5thumbs

Member
I have a medium ST1. I needed more room to stretch out my arms and also raise the handle bars to be more upright. I bought this part for $40 and it worked perfect for me. Ritchey, Adjustable Stem, ST Comp Adjustable 120MM/45D. On the box 31.8 is checked (I think this is the diameter of the handle bar) and 120mm (the length of the stem). It also comes in a couple of other lengths (80mm and 100mm). It took about 20 minutes to change the stem. Here is a link to vendor.


41eizyzzqwL.jpg
 

GW Shark

Member
I think you explained very well. Important to get a bike with a frame and geometry that fits you!
You like I have probably had to adjust what your bike choices were due to frame size. At 6'1" it needs to be a 19 or 20" minimum and not all manufacturers can foot that bill. I tried a Polaris Aapex bike and loved it conceptually and the shifting, but felt too cramped and like a monkey on a tricycle. The Stromers offer two sizes, Specialized 3 or 4, the Haibikes similar to Specialized in a given model. This plays havoc on a stocking dealer and their cost of inventory, but if you have to modify it too much on geometry, could you be trying to make a bike something it is not??
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
I made this exact change to my non-ebike, a Specialized hybrid model, last year. Neck & back problems meant I could not comfortably ride in a more aggressive position. In my particular case I did have to have the cables replaced as the ones on my Specialized bike were too short to accommodate a 3 inch stem rise.

Anyway, it worked out fine as far as changes go. Of course now I never ride the bike because I have my eBike, but that's neither here nor there.
 
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MLB

Well-Known Member
His concern was the type of riding condition and going down a hill with a higher center of gravity and pressure at a new point on the stem and hitting something.

There is usually the conservative view( Safety), the engineered view (What the numbers say for maximum efficiency) and the realistic view ( How it plays out in real time) Sometimes these are all very similar, but usually not.

I swim with the sharks and people think that is crazy, but you got to know your limitations, right!

Sure, but look at ALL the bikes out there and you'll see EVERY variable possible in frame and headset and angles and etc etc, and being used "successfully" to whatever degree.
I've swapped front ends on motorcycles putting out lots of hp and going very fast.
Most bikes are safely and middle of the pack geometry that you aren't going to change the bike with a couple of inches in steering stem. ;)
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
Tha
I think you explained very well. Important to get a bike with a frame and geometry that fits you![/QUOTE

I have the bike that fits me. The bars don't suit me.
Trust that I can change them without risk of life or limb!!
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
Are LBS equipped to replace hydraulic brake lines to fit? Or do you have to measure and order them from Magura or distributors?
 

DWEBiker

Active Member
My bars - Promax Cruiser 610mm
My stem - Promax Alloy 40 degree 25.4

I had too much weight on my hands to the point it was almost unbearable - a 4 inch rise was enough to let me drive it like a cadillac with a light touch
I am just a casual rider. I got my speed thrills when i was younger on motorcycles.
Now its more about comfort than speed
 
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GW Shark

Member
Are LBS equipped to replace hydraulic brake lines to fit? Or do you have to measure and order them from Magura or distributors?
Most LBS will be able to put in new lines to increase the length. As you know the lines have to be bled, replaced and refilled with Magura Royal Blood. Assuming you are talking front and back hydraulic line replacement, This will take time. A guesstimate would be $120 to $150 total assuming an hourly of $50/hour, parts included. Also the new lines would have to be ordered probably. I don't thing that is a common thing, but that all depends on your LBS right.
 

GW Shark

Member
Sure, but look at ALL the bikes out there and you'll see EVERY variable possible in frame and headset and angles and etc etc, and being used "successfully" to whatever degree.
I've swapped front ends on motorcycles putting out lots of hp and going very fast.
Most bikes are safely and middle of the pack geometry that you aren't going to change the bike with a couple of inches in steering stem. ;)
Your probably right. The concern in my instance was leverage in a downhill mountain bike application on the stem. I have a great LBS for mountain bikes and they given me options, pros/cons and let me decide.
 

DWEBiker

Active Member
Looking at my receipt they charged me $88 for the rear hydraulic line - then they cannabilized the rear line and used it for the front saving me money. Labor was $110 - so about $200 total
88 (was a lot more because for some reason i forget ---- i had to use more expensive parts) i didnt want to wait for them to order parts - if they ordered it would have been about 30 cheaper so like 170ish - http://easyridersbikes.com/ did my work - they are really good - been in business selling bikes since 1973
 
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