How to Prevent Flat Tires on Electric Bikes

Mike TowpathTraveler

Well-Known Member
If you are insuieting my post about flat spots and smooshy feel as a wives tale,... I would advise to carfully read posts,.. as mine was in regards to "solid foam inserts" solid foam means NO inner tube,.. not T/A's. Reading is fundamental.
I did "carfully" read your posts and came to the conclusion that you just don't know what yer talking about. Not surprising as you don't own either product. To help you along, the tire inserts do fit inside the standard rubber compound tire (please see my pictures posted earlier to help you visualize this) and do most certainly require a tube. If you are referring to their tubeless tires, you need to refer to them as Airless Tires. Two different animals altogether. As I've reported earlier, the T/A foam tire liners do not feel smooshy, do not develop flat spots nor do they feel wobbly; this info gained from several thousand miles of me pedaling atop them. Take what I write with a grain of salt as equally as you do for the rider here who reported back a wobbly feel on his bike. For the benefit of everyone on the forum here, buy a couple of those airless tires, put a few thousand miles on them, then report back with your findings. Parroting other's findings as you did does not count, LOL.

And when ripping a person on a forum, always but always use spell check. It just defeats the purpose and it's bad form when you don't; amirite?
 

Tars Tarkas

Well-Known Member
I would think drilling rims is something someone who really knows what they are doing is going to do, or someone who has no frigging idea and just can't figure out how to fit his valve stem into the wheel. Probably more of the latter. In any case, it's bound to be very rare.

The inserts that allow Presta valves in a Shrader holes are probably more for people who have Shrader wheels and want to use Presta tubes, or valves, anyway, for whatever reason. Still, I imagine the market for these inserts is pretty minimal. I'm not surprised the doodads exist though.

TT
 

JES2020

Active Member
I did "carfully" read your posts and came to the conclusion that you just don't know what yer talking about. Not surprising as you don't own either product. To help you along, the tire inserts do fit inside the standard rubber compound tire (please see my pictures posted earlier to help you visualize this) and do most certainly require a tube. If you are referring to their tubeless tires, you need to refer to them as Airless Tires. Two different animals altogether. As I've reported earlier, the T/A foam tire liners do not feel smooshy, do not develop flat spots nor do they feel wobbly; this info gained from several thousand miles of me pedaling atop them. Take what I write with a grain of salt as equally as you do for the rider here who reported back a wobbly feel on his bike. For the benefit of everyone on the forum here, buy a couple of those airless tires, put a few thousand miles on them, then report back with your findings. Parroting other's findings as you did does not count, LOL.

And when ripping a person on a forum, always but always use spell check. It just defeats the purpose and it's bad form when you don't; amirite?
"If you are referring to their tubeless tires, you need to refer to them as Airless Tires"

For the analy retentive, (more later), they are called.

Stop-A-Flat Puncture-proof, Thorn-resistant, No-flat Bicycle Tubes​

"Parroting other's findings as you did does not count, LOL"

So much for forums like this one then hey? ...Yes everyone, go out and re invent the wheel because other peoples experiences don't count, there all "wives tales"..... Worst advice EVER!

Be warned the following link contains a customer rating system, so be prepared to ignore them, because we wouldn't ever want to encourage " parroting" Brahaha.

 

pmcdonald

Well-Known Member
Tannus Aither look like a more mature solution to removing air completely from the equation. I hear the ride is on the opposite end of the spectrum: like riding on 120 psi tyres. I'd hate to break a spoke with that system too!
 

Terry777

Active Member
True enuff Stefan, but then a rear tire on a mid-drive isn´t remotely as much of a hassle as a rear hub. A dbl. leg is also handy for things
like brake adjustment or spoke tuning & replacement, but I also have a rear mount single for general use on the bike. A dbl leg
requires a level surface.
It is for me.... i have a belt drive! 💥 👀 lol
 

Terry777

Active Member
The MAXXIS tyres that are on mine have extra sidewall protection so i figured fitting "Tuffy" tyre liners off rip should keep me as protected as i can be. In saying that, there's always that little s*it "1 in a million puncture" out there that you can't account for. We can only try our best....
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
It is for me.... i have a belt drive! 💥 👀 lol
With much practice, I´ve developed a tire drill for rear hubs, but it´s still annoying as hell. Too many blackberries & wild roses here whose
thorns wind up in the bike lane. At least I´ve discovered a way to replace spokes without taking the wheel off.
 

Terry777

Active Member
Any wee thing that helps is a good thing when it comes to changing tyres or punctures. I'm hoping i don't get any but we'll see. Scotland has a ton of thorny trees, it's just your luck if you "get one" or not. 😊
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
Any wee thing that helps is a good thing when it comes to changing tyres or punctures. I'm hoping i don't get any but we'll see. Scotland has a ton of thorny trees, it's just your luck if you "get one" or not. 😊
I´ve become vigilant about debris in the road, spooks the hell outa passing drivers when I swerve to avoid branches.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
With much practice, I´ve developed a tire drill for rear hubs, but it´s still annoying as hell. Too many blackberries & wild roses here whose
thorns wind up in the bike lane. At least I´ve discovered a way to replace spokes without taking the wheel off.
Hi John, care to share your method with other EBR members? Thanks
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
Hi John, care to share your method with other EBR members? Thanks
Have done so several times in earlier posts , but hereś the gist. For a spoke use a tire lever to pull tire & *tube aside next to broke spoke.
Pull the rim strip aside. Use a magnetic screwdiver or other mag. to remove nipple. install spoke from the ´correct´side¨Gingerly,
using a mag screwdriver or needlenose, insert new nipple down onto spoke & tighten. replace rim strip, tube & tire
The wheel drill:: drop chain off chainring to inside of pedal. disconnect power. Unscrew derailleur or preferably it´s hanger & let it hang
off to the side. Assuming you have a dbl. leg kickstand, loosen bolts & rock bike forward to drop out wheel. You may have to turn the
axle slightly to get it to drop. Be careful not to damage threads. To replace,(very important to return washers in the correct order & position)
pronged washers first into dropout notch under the axle. Position wheel under dropouts so that axle matches the notch. lower bike onto
dropouts,.put chain on freewheel & tighten axle nuts, connect derailleur, chain back on chainring, connect power. Sry, that´s as simple as it gets
on a rear hub motor.
* let some air out 1st
 
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Terry777

Active Member
National flower is a thorn thistle, IIRC...
Yes, it is buddy. Those are kinda soft flowery thorns more than tree/branch thorns. They hurt like hell if you get one in your hand or whatever but for a bike tyre it is no problem.
The farmers here use these real tough tightly woven hedge things to protect their fences. They build the fence then plant these things along the line and they wrap around the fence as they grow forming a formidable divider between fields, roads and anything else. Most farmers use them here in Scotland They are evil! Those things produce thorns that will easily have the best of a bike tyre all day long! They are along some of the trails and stuff too. You wanna stay away from them buggers. 😈
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove
Yes, it is buddy. Those are kinda soft flowery thorns more than tree/branch thorns. They hurt like hell if you get one in your hand or whatever but for a bike tyre it is no problem.
The farmers here use these real tough tightly woven hedge things to protect their fences. They build the fence then plant these things along the line and they wrap around the fence as they grow forming a formidable divider between fields, roads and anything else. Most farmers use them here in Scotland They are evil! Those things produce thorns that will easily have the best of a bike tyre all day long! They are along some of the trails and stuff too. You wanna stay away from them buggers. 😈
They story that I was told was that whichever tribe (Saxons perhaps ?) that was attempting to attack the Scots traveled barefoot over the moors and the thistles torn their feet up so badly that they weren't fit to fight, giving the Scots an easy victory. Perhaps true, but nonetheless no other country is as famous for thorns as Scotland . And I saw the blackthorn hedges in the countryside years ago on a trip. Nasty, living barb wire ...
 

Terry777

Active Member
Lol They would have been scratching like mofu’s! Never mind looking for a fight. The Scottish Thistle is the one that leaves a rash that drives you crazy even if you just brush past it! Standing on one would be enough to bring an army to it’s knees very easily. They are evil! They make a very nice cup of tea... I hear! The ones on the hedges, you could literally stab someone with them. Where do you live?