How to Prevent Flat Tires on Electric Bikes

reed scott

Well-Known Member
I probably said this earlier but the only way I can get my big ole bike upside down is to go vertical on the back tire while controlling the brake then ease her down on the bars. Of course the display is the problem. You gotta have blocks or something. I just ordered the 'Handlebar Jacks' for field repairs. Very handy. If you have a rear fender this can also be a problem. My fairly heavy duty rear rack removes this as a problem. 👍
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
You don't have to flip the bike over to fix a flat. You don't even need to remove the wheel.

My biggest challenge fixing flats that way is finding the hole in the tube -- in a busy or noisy place that usually takes me longer than everything else does, by far.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
I probably said this earlier but the only way I can get my big ole bike upside down is to go vertical on the back tire while controlling the brake then ease her down on the bars. Of course the display is the problem. You gotta have blocks or something. I just ordered the 'Handlebar Jacks' for field repairs. Very handy. If you have a rear fender this can also be a problem. My fairly heavy duty rear rack removes this as a problem. 👍
The handlebar jacks are a very useful tool... they are compact and easy to carry on the road or trail.
 

JES2020

Active Member
I'm still hunting for my first e-bike but have many years of regular bike experience. I used to be able to locate the tube puncture while wheel was still on bike and break bead, pull that section of tube out of tire, repair it, push it back in, pump up and ride off all in 15 minutes. Those were high pressure, 90 psi road tires. Is there anything on an ebike wheel to prevent doing that?
Not if you are lucky enough to find the leak without taking out the tube.
 

Scarlet/Fire

Active Member
Region
USA
I had slime AND a liner...sidewall tore and tube blew a dime sized hole. luckily I was home but this tuffy would have saved my neck out in the wild.

I never thought of a double leg for repairs. Makes sense, not sure one will fit on my bike so I need to get it home and use my cieling wench in my garage to lift the whole bike off the ground.

Another trick is you can actually stuff you tire with grass and leaves then ride home gently to avoid rime damage.
Ohhh that’s great! Very organic!
 

Comfortably Numb

Active Member
Thanks for that information, 911. Never too old to learn, LOL. Figured if a place like Universal did not carry it, then it ain't out there. Anywho, if for whatever reason folks feel the need to drill out their rim to make room for a schrader valve/tube, then I hope they realize that the little insert there is going to have to go under the rim strip, lest they risk abrading and wearing the rubber surrounding the valve with that metal insert.

In all of my years of riding and the other forum I participate in, I simply do not ever recall seeing anyone drilling a presta sized rim out for a schrader. I'd advise against it; the presta with it's locknut keeps that tube in place when mtb'ers air down to single digits.
I have, and so has a friend of mine, so now you know of at least two.
Both of us removed knobbies from MTBs and went to street tires, in my case, Schwalbe Marathon Es and tubes with Schraders. I have a quick connect air hose with a Schrader fitting and a couple of compressors.
I eliminated any Presta from my life when I let my last roadbike go. Other than being pretty much necessary on thinner rims, I see no advantage to them over Schrader. I suppose if one was a weight weenie, a pair of Prestas over Schraders could be mandatory. I’ve never been one.
CN
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
I think the best valve is the style that works for you. With that said, Presta valves have a couple of advantages over Schrader that make them a good choice in certain applications. For narrow rims the smaller diameter Presta valve and their accompanying 60% reduction in hole area can be a must have in certain rims. Presta valves are also designed to handle higher pressures than Schraders. These are mostly considerations for road riding. They are also available in various lengths to suit the profile of your rims. This is why I use them on all our bikes. I use shorter valve lengths on the single walled rims and longer lengths on the heavier duty double walled rims where Schrader valves would not work. One valve style, one pump head style. Works for me.

This article has a good discussion of the two valve styles;
 

m@Robertson

Active Member
Region
USA
I'm still hunting for my first e-bike but have many years of regular bike experience. I used to be able to locate the tube puncture while wheel was still on bike and break bead, pull that section of tube out of tire, repair it, push it back in, pump up and ride off all in 15 minutes. Those were high pressure, 90 psi road tires. Is there anything on an ebike wheel to prevent doing that?
This is what I do on tubed tires of any size roadside, if at all possible. Lay the bike on its side, pull one bead and have at it. Or lean it up against a rock, tree, a wall etc and keep the bike upright.

This will seem weird but its very effective: If you cannot find the hole via reinflation and looking for/listening for air, or whatever ... your lips are far more sensitive than your regular skin. Run the tube near your lips. Or bend down and run your mouth past the tube. Not on it you pervert. Near it, over it, past it.

Your lips will sense the air rush of even the smallest goathead puncture that would have been otherwise tough to find (especially if its windy out). Obviously the fewer witnesses the better but if the chips are down this is going to get the hole found.

I haven't had to do this, thankfully, since I started getting serious about using thick sealants inside of tubes and tubeless. FlatOut Sportsman formula is a minor miracle for both jobs.
 

Nomad

Active Member
Unfortunately, the double leg kickstand doesn't fit most of mid-motor ebikes. I have one in my hub-motor e-bike, a valuable item indeed.

@reed scott: One of my e-bikes is equipped with tubeless wheels. I have mixed feeling about the concept. Last August I rode into a gravel road made of extremely hard and fine rock. A small shard of rock punctured a 2.6" thick tubeless tyre. The sealant was actually gushing through the hole, making the whole front of the bike dirty and difficult to clean (but that was just an aside). I was able to return at low tyre pressure to some civilised place. Meanwhile, the sealant did its work and the puncture got self-repaired (I had no tubeless repair kit with me). It was enough to re-inflate the wheel and I could continue my long trip.

View attachment 66358
Sealant attempting to do its work on the ride I mentioned. It eventually worked OK.

However, such fix is temporary. After returning home, it is basically necessary to remove the tyre (and pour any remaining sealant to a vessel); the rim tape should be replaced with a new one; the tyre is the best to vulcanise, replace on the wheel, adding fresh sealant. It is indeed a dirty job.

Benefits are the possibility to ride in rough terrain at low inflation pressure and the self-repairing capability (especially if one carries the repair kit with them - no need to remove the wheel). I reckon it is often easier to use a regular tubed wheel and just replace the inner tube on the ride...
When you notice the leak did you stop and put the leak in the six o clock position finger over the hole for a bit? As you probably already know carrying a dart or dynaplug is a good 💡 I know I know this is a old post
 

RGVCycling

Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
Check this out! Mikey from Blue Monkey Bikes just posted a video review of the Tannus Solid Tire insert that completely prevents flats. I haven't gotten all of the details yet, I'm guessing they offer limited sizes, but they look cool and he did a great job with it :)

I have the 700x28 on my Specialized Sirrus for a while now. Occasionally the back will feel a little squirrely but I've gotten used to it. Other than that, I really like them. No flats, no topping off PSI, no worries of forgetting tire changing tools. Literally, you just hop on the bike and go.
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
John, what is your experience with tubeless on that bike if any?
Tubeless? None. Being a big rider I´ve had more than my share of tire issues, especially with all the
blackberry thorns here. The stock smart sams were a very comfortable ride, bur flimsy sidewalls & low
pressure tires just weren´t cutting it. That issue is solved now that I´m on Schwalbe marathons,(green guard),.
28 X 2.00 tires at 70 psi & thick sidewalls. The sams were very fast rolling mtn. tires & fine if you are 170
or less. I can still do trails; I´m more a plodder than a shredder anyway & my bike is super uphill.
 

JES2020

Active Member
I have the 700x28 on my Specialized Sirrus for a while now. Occasionally the back will feel a little squirrely but I've gotten used to it. Other than that, I really like them. No flats, no topping off PSI, no worries of forgetting tire changing tools. Literally, you just hop on the bike and go.
I have heard they increase rolling resistance, was that your experience?
 

Bigal1463

Well-Known Member
Huffy 2 ended tubes come in various sizes and you don’t need to remove the wheel. Just pull open one side of tire with the wheel still in the bike. Cut the flat tube in half and remove. Then put a little air into the new tire and insert onto the wheel. Push both ends together and fill it. That’s it, I paid less than seven dollars for a 27.5 ” X 2”.
 

retiredNH

Member
Region
USA
Huffy 2 ended tubes come in various sizes and you don’t need to remove the wheel. Just pull open one side of tire with the wheel still in the bike. Cut the flat tube in half and remove. Then put a little air into the new tire and insert onto the wheel. Push both ends together and fill it. That’s it, I paid less than seven dollars for a 27.5 ” X 2”.
How clever!
 

RGVCycling

Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
I have heard they increase rolling resistance, was that your experience?
Yes to me it does have higher rolling resistance but I’m ok with that trade off. I just drop down one gear and keep on going. In keeping with the thought, turn a negative into a positive, it makes you stronger.
 

JES2020

Active Member
Yes to me it does have higher rolling resistance but I’m ok with that trade off. I just drop down one gear and keep on going. In keeping with the thought, turn a negative into a positive, it makes you stronger.
I put liners and slime in my tires. If I need more protection I think I'd go for the Tannus armor that way I can adjust the give and resistance .
 

RGVCycling

Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
I put liners and slime in my tires. If I need more protection I think I'd go for the Tannus armor that way I can adjust the give and resistance .
I did that too. Slime them up. A good alternative. I gave up on liners as I really feel they don’t do much good and they cause more of my flats. They Tannuus Armor looks like a good idea but haven’t tried them.
 

RGVCycling

Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
Expecting my 2 Tannus Armor today. My big concern is installing them. Tips anyone?
I’ve never tried them but the look to be a good solution to flats. Try installing on front wheel. If not successful, go to your bike shop for assistance. Report back on how they ride :)