How To Raise Your Handlebars (And Make Your E-Bike More Comfortable)

linklemming

Well-Known Member
Im not frowning on stem risers as they can have their purpose. If I had wanted to raise the bars on my 1994 MTB without getting a fork and running a long headtube spacers, a stem riser would have been the only way to go as I couldnt get the rise with stem and handlebars alone.

Sounds like a stem riser and handlebar you show, works for you especially with all the traction you get from fat tires and the trails you ride.
 

linklemming

Well-Known Member
I need to add some extra info. Some e-bikes (and Specialized ones are a good example) have the display mounted on a custom stem, and might have stem integrated headlight. Replacing or rotating the stem is impractical in such case, leaving the stem riser as the only option.
Good point. I ran into something similar on my iZIP Moda E3 with large brose display. When I went to a high rise stem with the stock bars, the display stuck out in the open and seemed vulnerable to getting damaged. The cable to the display were also not long enough and would have likely been damaged/broken in a crash so using a stem rise wouldnt have worked either. I was able to cure it with a higher rise 50mm handlebar.

Higher rise handlebars might also work for the case you mention, especially if you need less than what as stem rise forces you into. This also adds possibilities of different sweeps (both up and back) which isnt an option with a riser alone (or stem).

FWIW, While I mentioned reversing the stem, I was only done as reference as to something I did on a bike to 'reduce' the height which is the 'opposite' of what we are discussing here so I see no reason for you to edit your original post unless you want more ammo to support your position as the stem riser being the best solution by mentioning a case which wouldnt apply to anyone who wants to actually 'raise' their handlebars.

In addition, there can be a downside to higher rise handlebars as they usually have less clamp space next to the stem for accessories like lights (which might end up being canted due the change in handlebar diameter). This happened on my Moda mentioned above (the brose display took up enough handlebar space to make the lights canted and I had to add a handlebar extender.

Handlebar Extender

Here is a pic on my bike, I hate this solution and need to find some 50mm bars with more 31.8mm clamp space.

IMG_20201015_134758656_HDR.jpg
 
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FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
They are often frowned upon, but I opted for an adjustable stem riser. Not only did it raise the handlebars, it brought them rearward a bit, decreasing both hand numbness and reach and lower back pain.

One of the Amazon comments regarding any fear of movement of the adjustable stem riser while in use:
I also added a Metropolis handlebar, which also improved comfort (by decreasing reach and relaxing hand position) immensely:
I’m riding mostly roads and rail trails on my fat e bike, and I’ve read neither of these options may be appropriate for aggressive eMTB riding.
I agree. ;)
An adjustable stem riser should be fine for road and light trail use... just don't use one for aggressive riding offroad with an EMTB.
 

linklemming

Well-Known Member
Here are a couple of sources on different 'comfort bars' for bikepackers who put in alot of miles.

https://bikepacking.com/index/comfort-mtb-handlebars/

https://www.cyclingabout.com/all-about-bike-touring-handlebars/

https://www.cyclingabout.com/comparing-koga-denham-bar-shape-with-alt-bars/

The website cyclingabout.com is a great resource for information much of would apply to ebikes.

I have his bikepacking book as well, alot of stuff in the book I already knew but I did learn quite alot. He also has a youtube channel.

As far as 'alternate bars', I have tried the salsa bend in 17 and 23 degrees sweepback. I do like the 17 more but dont have it mounted on any bike at the moment.

I am running the Origin 8 strongbow on my Juiced CCX and like it alot. Its nice to get aero on the front part of the bar on really windy days (~30mph)
 

bikeman242

Active Member
Good point. I ran into something similar on my iZIP Moda E3 with large brose display. When I went to a high rise stem with the stock bars, the display stuck out in the open and seemed vulnerable to getting damaged. The cable to the display were also not long enough and would have likely been damaged/broken in a crash so using a stem rise wouldnt have worked either. I was able to cure it with a higher rise 50mm handlebar.

Higher rise handlebars might also work for the case you mention, especially if you need less than what as stem rise forces you into. This also adds possibilities of different sweeps (both up and back) which isnt an option with a riser alone (or stem).

FWIW, While I mentioned reversing the stem, I was only done as reference as to something I did on a bike to 'reduce' the height which is the 'opposite' of what we are discussing here so I see no reason for you to edit your original post unless you want more ammo to support your position as the stem riser being the best solution by mentioning a case which wouldnt apply to anyone who wants to actually 'raise' their handlebars.

In addition, there can be a downside to higher rise handlebars as they usually have less clamp space next to the stem for accessories like lights (which might end up being canted due the change in handlebar diameter). This happened on my Moda mentioned above (the brose display took up enough handlebar space to make the lights canted and I had to add a handlebar extender.

Handlebar Extender

Here is a pic on my bike, I hate this solution and need to find some 50mm bars with more 31.8mm clamp space.

View attachment 68718

I tried this earlier in the year, reversing my stem, and the handling of the bike became incredible unstable. I don't know how you ride like this.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
I tried this earlier in the year, reversing my stem, and the handling of the bike became incredible unstable. I don't know how you ride like this.
Simply reversing the stem should not create handling problems... did you make any other changes at the same time?
 

arcom

Active Member
I tried this earlier in the year, reversing my stem, and the handling of the bike became incredible unstable. I don't know how you ride like this.
Do you mean you just flipped it over, or rotated it 180° so it faced the other way, towards the rear of the bike?
 

bikeman242

Active Member
Do you mean you just flipped it over, or rotated it 180° so it faced the other way, towards the rear of the bike?

Rotated it 180 degrees, so it faced towards the rear. I remember there was a post here on EBR of some other guy that did this - he said he learned it from an orthopedic physician. Handling was completely unstable.

I ended up going with those Jones riser bars
 

linklemming

Well-Known Member
I tried this earlier in the year, reversing my stem, and the handling of the bike became incredible unstable. I don't know how you ride like this.
Thats not at all what I meant. Yes that would make a bad handling bike. I remember the post you stated and thought that was crazy and moved on.

In the cycling world, reversing your stem refers for flipping it over so instead of being +6degree, it is now -6 degree. A google search for 'flipping stem' confirms this.

Im curious why you would think I said that. I gave an example of reversing my stem to lower it/make me less upright. Thats the opposite of what your talking about. (moving it back/making you more upright)

Edit: Im guessing you keyed off the term 'reversing' instead of 'flipping'. Never thought I would have to explain that. FWIW. post#2 referred to 'reversing' with an 'actual video' demonstrating it so I went with the terminology being used for this post to avoid confusion.
 
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FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Rotated it 180 degrees, so it faced towards the rear. I remember there was a post here on EBR of some other guy that did this - he said he learned it from an orthopedic physician. Handling was completely unstable.

I ended up going with those Jones riser bars

Ah, that explains the problem... rotating 180' degrees is never advised.

I was referring to the practice of flipping the stem up or down a few degrees.

Well, good choice with Jones Bars... better ergonomics and a few inches of rise.

1602870402568.png
 

JES2020

Active Member
Are these compatible with a Mirrycle bar end rear view mirror?
I just came back from a trial ride with modified bar ends with a four piece adaption that I simply love.
I used to get sour shoulders and neck muscles with the flat bars so I added a short bar end in reverse position (up instead of forward) which allows me to sit up more.
Well the ends of the bars were not comfortable on my hands so I attached an ergonomic additional end on top of the first bar end. Now when I ride I can lean into the grip and it actually relieves tension in the neck and shoulders ! Simply amazing! Total cost...$14
IMG_0751.jpg
 

como813

New Member
como did it right if you want comfort. seat, handlebars, grips, reach, big tires, etc. but no bike fits everyone. as for the display and light on stem? (speaking about como) its not on the stem. they're attached to handlebars in a way like everything else on there with a couple vertical adjustments and can be moved laterally too. i'm sure there's a way around a stem mount display through a competent bike shop. good luck with that...
 

dodahman

Active Member
Thank you for contributing to this thread! Your points are valid. I simply described the fastest, cheapest and simplest way to make an e-bike (specifically: Turbo Vado, which sports several varieties of quite specialized stems) more comfortable. Almost everybody complains on the Vado design with the respect to the forward riding position. Raising the bars is the simplest way.

I should have had the thread named "How To Raise Your Vado Handlebars". You wouldn't believe how many people have already asked such a question... :)
I should have had the thread named "How To Raise Your Vado Handlebars"
I never would have read all this good info if you had done that. so I like the title.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
I just came back from a trial ride with modified bar ends with a four piece adaption that I simply love.
I used to get sour shoulders and neck muscles with the flat bars so I added a short bar end in reverse position (up instead of forward) which allows me to sit up more.
Well the ends of the bars were not comfortable on my hands so I attached an ergonomic additional end on top of the first bar end. Now when I ride I can lean into the grip and it actually relieves tension in the neck and shoulders ! Simply amazing! Total cost...$14
View attachment 70110
Reminds me a bit of this... o_O

1605650391442.png


You may want to try out the Ergon GP5 grips shown below. ;)
1605650625602.png
 
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theemartymac

Active Member
I just got a new set of bars in to try. Since I'm 6' tall, but one of those 'long torso - short leg' guys, I need just a little bit of rise, and want a few more degrees of rearward sweep. I personally don't like the look of stem spacers, and since my bike has an adjustable stem, I figure I can get the most fine tuning with this combination. We'll see how they turnout this week.

 

JES2020

Active Member
Reminds me a bit of this... o_O

View attachment 71675

You may want to try out the Ergon GP5 grips shown below. ;)


View attachment 71679
I actually did see these Ergons and many others, but I needed to shift my weight back, not forward.
These other, extremely ugly bars you post🦨👎, look nothing like mine.

My extension are pointing back, towards the seat and actually allow me to lean back so far that my shoulders are behind my hips and still have a comfortable grip.

I originally thought to put a different set of handlebars on, but that would require me to re place the brake and shift cables as they were too short. Not to mention the considerable work of re mounting the grips brakes and shifters and other mounts on the bars. On the other hand my bar ends took a total of 15 min and look absolutely beautiful,🌷👍 (I have received many complements and imitators.)