HT-1000 First Crash

Whelp. First crash on the HT was a doozy!

I've got a little over 150 miles on my HT, commuting into downtown Seattle on a daily basis and I love my bike! I had switched out the stock 29x2.25" Maxxis knobbies for 700c x 2.00 Schwalbe Marathon's. I love how smooth and quiet they are as well as pavement grippy. Having ridden on 28mm road tires for 40+ years, the 2-inch tires felt cushy, comfortable, and capable of absorbing all sorts of pavement sins and defects. I probably got over confident. Riding out of downtown on my way home in the middle of rush hour traffic last week, I glanced over my left shoulder to prepare to merge around a right turning car ahead of me. Just as I looked left, my front tire hit a really bad pavement seam where one side of the seam was about an inch and a half lower than the other. Unfortunately, it was the bad way for me and the nearly invisible edge kicked my front wheel and fork hard to the right and I was slammed to the pavement to the left. I saw stars! When I tried to get up, my vision was all blurry and I had no balance. I just knew that I needed to get out of the way of traffic traffic that was driving around me. My first thought was remembering how quickly the concrete came up at my face and I thought, "I need to get a full face helmet!". There was absolutely zero time for reaction. Zero. If you're one of those people who think that you'll just turn your head and shoulders sideways as you see yourself falling, forget about it. Seriously, it happens that fast. Fortunately, I had been wearing elbow pads which I'm pretty sure saved me from having a shattered elbow. I knew that I was pretty busted up, though, because I had no strength in my left arm when I tried to get my bike off to the sidewalk. Nobody stopped to help me either, which really shocked me. Anyway, to make the long story a little shorter, I ended up with a broken collarbone and 4 broken ribs. The rib breaks were high and on the back side, so it was clear that I was dumped squarely onto my left side and the point of my shoulder.

The takeaway is to be vigilant for road conditions, especially when your attention is constantly divided when riding in traffic. I've always thought that urban traffic riding is a bit like being in a group knife fight. I was lucky that I was only traveling at about 15mph, and not the usual 29-35+mph that the bike is capable of. I'm really going to think hard about a hardier helmet and jacket before jumping back into the fight. I'm interested in hearing what others think or have experience with either DOT helmets or downhill rated MTB helmets. I've heard people say that full face helmets "brand" you as a road maverick, but after getting out of the hospital with 2-3 months of healing and rehab ahead of me, who cares what others think?! I think of myself as a road laws abiding rider in every sense of the phrase. I don't blow lights or stop signs, I don't ride bike only lanes, and I don't "flaunt" my bike's speed around other analog bikes. I just want to be realistic about the risks that I'm faced with since I've chosen to up the ante with road velocity. Would love to hear your thoughts on this!

If you have accident stories to share, feel free to reply here so that we all can benefit from thinking about how to be safe out there while we enjoy the sport that we love. Take good care, everybody! Cheers, ~Steve
 
Oh yeah, the bike is fine. It's got some nice new "badges of courage" on it, but it definitely came out better than I did! ~Steve
 

Mulezen

Well-Known Member
I wrecked my Trek Allant 9s about two weeks or a bit longer ago. I was just…so to speak…just getting up to speed after three months of recovery from a bad rotator surgery. My PT told me at the last session I could ride the country roads around my area, but stay off the farm roads. But I took a right turn on my dead end road to cut through Bobby Lloyds 3000acre farm on the rutted, somewhat hilly track that saved me three miles of HS traffic. A shaded pothole going down to a stream crossing caught me sending me over the handle bars skidding along the gravel. I rolled over on my back and panted for five minutes, then checked my carbon frame. Then noticed I was bleeding from three appendages, the surgical side untouched. A slow ride home as I realized how sore my ribs were.
 
I wrecked my Trek Allant 9s about two weeks or a bit longer ago. I was just…so to speak…just getting up to speed after three months of recovery from a bad rotator surgery. My PT told me at the last session I could ride the country roads around my area, but stay off the farm roads. But I took a right turn on my dead end road to cut through Bobby Lloyds 3000acre farm on the rutted, somewhat hilly track that saved me three miles of HS traffic. A shaded pothole going down to a stream crossing caught me sending me over the handle bars skidding along the gravel. I rolled over on my back and panted for five minutes, then checked my carbon frame. Then noticed I was bleeding from three appendages, the surgical side untouched. A slow ride home as I realized how sore my ribs were.
Wow. So basically, you were making sure that you had full body coverage with injuries, just to stay balanced, huh? Kidding. So sorry for your injuries, too! It's been a long time since I've taken a trip over the bars. That's pretty frightening since you have a little more time to see what's coming up at you. Hope your healing process goes well. Take good care!
 

Mulezen

Well-Known Member
I don’t think I’ve ever been over the bars before. I’m 72yo and considered myself lucky…I was isolated. My phone flew off and my new camera in the trunk bag Too. No problems…equipment wise I lost my USB blinker and my shifting is wonky though I did 20miles with no trouble today.
 

TForan

Well-Known Member
Thanks! How did your tires save you? Can you elaborate?
They are much more forgiving than the skinnier tires. Less deflection by a large margin . I had a single speed 18lb Trek with 28x700 tires and it was scary to ride on these streets. With its long wheelbase, weight and the tires, it's a urban assault bike !
 

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mjeds

Active Member
Region
USA
That's the kind of conditions I deal with quite often. My 3.5x26 tires have saved me several times. Glad you are OK.
yup fat tires are great on crappy pavement, one of the reasons I choose a fat tire over a slim tire e-bike. been riding motorcycles for 35 years, "phat tires" rule the road when it comes to the horrible infrastructure.

my 2005 VTX1800 has 240 rear and a 120 front, wide ass tires, don't even have to put my feet down at a red light as the tires are wide enough to balance the bike. .
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
yup fat tires are great on crappy pavement, one of the reasons I choose a fat tire over a slim tire e-bike. been riding motorcycles for 35 years, "phat tires" rule the road when it comes to the horrible infrastructure.

my 2005 VTX1800 has 240 rear and a 120 front, wide ass tires, don't even have to put my feet down at a red light as the tires are wide enough to balance the bike. .
Huh, the only serious accident I had was on a fat bike. Broken collarbone for me too.
 
I don’t think I’ve ever been over the bars before. I’m 72yo and considered myself lucky…I was isolated. My phone flew off and my new camera in the trunk bag Too. No problems…equipment wise I lost my USB blinker and my shifting is wonky though I did 20miles with no trouble today.
Huh, the only serious accident I had was on a fat bike. Broken collarbone for me too.
What’s your story Rich?
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Collarbones and cyclists, it happens all the time. Sorry about the crashes. My last one was when a dog on a 12 ft. leash crossed a bike path and jumped on me. I had bruises of every color.
As for the fastest, smoothest tires for urban rides the best are Schwalbe Super Moto X at up to 2.8. They fly on the worst broken pavement and are rated e-50 and have high puncture resistance. My 29er has Big Bens which are also nice.
 

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mjeds

Active Member
Region
USA
Huh, the only serious accident I had was on a fat bike. Broken collarbone for me too.

but what caused your accident? my comment was specifically in reference to the OPs issue where his tires caught a part of uneven pavement that was wider than his tire.

I have the same type of road seams and broken pavement on my commute, the 5" fat tires on the bikonit and the 4" on the Cyrusher I was using prior, manage these pavement issues without a problem, they don't catch the cracks and cause the bike to wobble. the 700x25c tires on my road bike are scary as hell on this pavement, they catch the grooves and make the bike wobble, and there is really no way around them unless I want to be in the middle of a traffic lane.

similar issue with crotch rocket tires vs. my phat tires on my VTX, shitty roads with wide cracks or seams where the transportation department decided to reduce the shoulder and make another lane putting the cement seam in the middle of the lane, not an issue for a car tire, BIG problem for a motorcycle tire.
 

mjeds

Active Member
Region
USA
I see this crap all over Los Angeles, streets and freeways, these seams are supposed to be between the lanes and what the lane markers are painted over, but some asshat in Sacramento decided the easiest way to add a lane is to reduce the shoulder width and remark the lanes, putting the joint seams in the middle of the lanes, and these follow the curves, and with earth movement can be uneven. very dangerous for motorcycles, and the same thing is common now on surface streets where they have remarked for parking and/or bike lanes, making the bike lanes unsafe for cyclists. uneven pavement, that grabs your tires.

Stupid civil engineers and politicians making decisions with no clue what they are doing.


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Marci jo

Well-Known Member
I see this crap all over Los Angeles, streets and freeways, these seams are supposed to be between the lanes and what the lane markers are painted over, but some asshat in Sacramento decided the easiest way to add a lane is to reduce the shoulder width and remark the lanes, putting the joint seams in the middle of the lanes, and these follow the curves, and with earth movement can be uneven. very dangerous for motorcycles, and the same thing is common now on surface streets where they have remarked for parking and/or bike lanes, making the bike lanes unsafe for cyclists. uneven pavement, that grabs your tires.

Stupid civil engineers and politicians making decisions with no clue what they are doing.


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Terrible bike lane. Made for a toothpick on wheels.
 

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
Oh no, be careful out there! Hope all heal quickly from your crashes.
Can’t believe nobody stopped.
I went down while almost stopped. It was at a roundabout and 3 cars stopped to asked if I was hurt. I was only embarrassed but very grateful for the Good Samaritans.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I see this crap all over Los Angeles, streets and freeways, these seams are supposed to be between the lanes and what the lane markers are painted over, but some asshat in Sacramento decided the easiest way to add a lane is to reduce the shoulder width and remark the lanes, putting the joint seams in the middle of the lanes, and these follow the curves, and with earth movement can be uneven. very dangerous for motorcycles, and the same thing is common now on surface streets where they have remarked for parking and/or bike lanes, making the bike lanes unsafe for cyclists. uneven pavement, that grabs your tires.

Stupid civil engineers and politicians making decisions with no clue what they are doing.


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just curious.. will radar cruise control still work with those multiple lines?