Hydraulic Brake Question

Csubi

Active Member
Region
Canada
The front brake is the most effective, giving between 60 & 80% of the bike's stopping power in hard stops, depending upon surface conditions. This is because most of the weight of the bike and rider transfers forward onto the front wheel when the brakes are applied.
Source: The All Mighty Google.
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
The front brake is the most effective, giving between 60 & 80% of the bike's stopping power in hard stops, depending upon surface conditions. This is because most of the weight of the bike and rider transfers forward onto the front wheel when the brakes are applied.
Source: The All Mighty Google.
Wonder if this is as true for bikes as it is for cars and motorcycles? After all, whereas in a car (at least for cars with an engine in the front!) most of the weight is in the front (60% or more) and suspensions tend to "dive" with hard braking, bikes aren't like that. The other thing is that I've been taught over the years to bias toward the rear, to avoid flipping over the bars on hard breaking. Indeed, my spouse didn't once, and paid the price...
I guess I just don't see any way to transfer weight forward, unless one is going down a very steep hill! :)
 

Csubi

Active Member
Region
Canada
Defiantly for motorcycles and cars. The only thing I remember from my motorcycle license class over 20 years ago was this front brake percentage. Also, I change the front brakes on my car and truck every 1.5 years. I have never changed the back brakes once.
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Defiantly for motorcycles and cars. The only thing I remember from my motorcycle license class over 20 years ago was this front brake percentage. Also, I change the front brakes on my car and truck every 1.5 years. I have never changed the back brakes once.
Yea, it probably doesn't matter, just check them on your bike often, and be aware of "signals" that it's time for a change.
 

PDoz

Well-Known Member
Wonder if this is as true for bikes as it is for cars and motorcycles? After all, whereas in a car (at least for cars with an engine in the front!) most of the weight is in the front (60% or more) and suspensions tend to "dive" with hard braking, bikes aren't like that. The other thing is that I've been taught over the years to bias toward the rear, to avoid flipping over the bars on hard breaking. Indeed, my spouse didn't once, and paid the price...
I guess I just don't see any way to transfer weight forward, unless one is going down a very steep hill! :)

Pretty easy to test - set speed, set braking point, try two runs with front / rear. Perhaps a few more runs getting right back over the rear wheel.

Front for stopping, rear for steering