Hydraulic Brakes on RadWagon 4

ZiZiL

New Member
Region
USA
Hello. I have recently bought RadWagon 4. I has not yet arrived but should be here in 5 days or so. That being said, I am a bit worried about the brakes since I will be carrying my two kids on there.
My mountain bike (non electric) has full hydraulic brakes and I am very impressed with the stopping power. I am curious if anyone here upgraded from the mechanical disc brakes to full hydraulic brakes on radwagons.

Thanks for the responses.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Hello. I have recently bought RadWagon 4. I has not yet arrived but should be here in 5 days or so. That being said, I am a bit worried about the brakes since I will be carrying my two kids on there.
My mountain bike (non electric) has full hydraulic brakes and I am very impressed with the stopping power. I am curious if anyone here upgraded from the mechanical disc brakes to full hydraulic brakes on radwagons.

Thanks for the responses.
Bolton and Electro Bike World both sell Shimano hydraulic brakes for RadRover.


The only problem is, RadRover's hydraulic line will be shorter than RadWagon.
You will just need to replace it with longer line, which I don't think it's hard to do.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
I would ride the bike for a bit and answer the question regarding replacing them based on your experience.

Are the hydraulics nicer? Probably.

Are they necessary to stop the bike safely? I don't believe they are.

Been riding a RAD with mechanical brakes for 4 years now. Still on the original pads. I'm 315 lbs, and the bike is used in an area with some pretty decent hills. We can see 30mph pretty easily coming down some of them. The mechanicals have yet to scare me!
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
I would ride the bike for a bit and answer the question regarding replacing them based on your experience.

Are the hydraulics nicer? Probably.

Are they necessary to stop the bike safely? I don't believe they are.

Been riding a RAD with mechanical brakes for 4 years now. Still on the original pads. I'm 315 lbs, and the bike is used in an area with some pretty decent hills. We can see 30mph pretty easily coming down some of them. The mechanicals have yet to scare me!
if you're still on the original pads you're not braking a whole lot.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I would ride the bike for a bit and answer the question regarding replacing them based on your experience.

Are the hydraulics nicer? Probably.

Are they necessary to stop the bike safely? I don't believe they are.

Been riding a RAD with mechanical brakes for 4 years now. Still on the original pads. I'm 315 lbs, and the bike is used in an area with some pretty decent hills. We can see 30mph pretty easily coming down some of them. The mechanicals have yet to scare me!
Hydraulic is definitely better.

Some people argue (not you) how they don't need hydraulic brakes because mechanical brakes are still strong enough to lock the front wheel if you squeeze it hard.

What I really liked about full hydraulic (not cable actuated hydraulic) was how it felt like butter and I only had to put very little effort.

Hydraulic brakes are definitely stronger for little effort, and it's not only about stopping power, but for me, it was about control.

I would recommend hydraulic to anyone... and I also like the fact that I don't have to keep adjusting the wire like mechanical brakes.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
Hydraulic is definitely better.

Some people argue (not you) how they don't need hydraulic brakes because mechanical brakes are still strong enough to lock the front wheel if you squeeze it hard.

What I really liked about full hydraulic (not cable actuated hydraulic) was how it felt like butter and I only had to put very little effort.

Hydraulic brakes are definitely stronger for little effort, and it's not only about stopping power, but for me, it was about control.

I would recommend hydraulic to anyone... and I also like the fact that I don't have to keep adjusting the wire like mechanical brakes.
so true the feel is so much nicer. that charges with brands too. my Shimano it's I have full power with 1 finger. its a great feel.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
if you're still on the original pads you're not braking a whole lot.
No city traffic for me. Way more rural. I refuse to ride next to vehicles weighing hundreds of time more than me, with nothing but a white line separating us.... -Al
 

ZiZiL

New Member
Region
USA
After some research, and recomendations from here, I am thinking about going with the JuinTech M1 and keeping the wires rather than going into full hydaulic. I know it is not perfect but at least I will get the smoth braking and not worry about adjusting the brakes every 20 miles or so. Do you think that is still worth it?
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I would ride the bike for a bit and answer the question regarding replacing them based on your experience.

Are the hydraulics nicer? Probably.

Are they necessary to stop the bike safely? I don't believe they are.

Been riding a RAD with mechanical brakes for 4 years now. Still on the original pads. I'm 315 lbs, and the bike is used in an area with some pretty decent hills. We can see 30mph pretty easily coming down some of them. The mechanicals have yet to scare me!
I agree. Proper adjustment of the mechanical discs is essential. These bikes come with organic pads. Swapping them for multi-metalic will be a huge improvement and is easy.
 

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McCorby

Well-Known Member
After some research, and recomendations from here, I am thinking about going with the JuinTech M1 and keeping the wires rather than going into full hydaulic. I know it is not perfect but at least I will get the smoth braking and not worry about adjusting the brakes every 20 miles or so. Do you think that is still worth it?
You may also want to consider TRP Hy/Rd mechanical hydraulic brakes. I have a set on my analog gravel bike and they work great. Whichever mechanical hydraulic brakes you decide on, be sure to use compression-less linear strand cable housings for best performance.

 
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Timpo

Well-Known Member
After some research, and recomendations from here, I am thinking about going with the JuinTech M1 and keeping the wires rather than going into full hydaulic. I know it is not perfect but at least I will get the smoth braking and not worry about adjusting the brakes every 20 miles or so. Do you think that is still worth it?
Me personally, no.
It will still be exposed to wire friction and cable adjustments. (because the wire will still stretch)

If you go on YouTube and check out the channel called CitizenCycle, they tested that brake on RadRover.
He pretty much said there's not much difference between JuinTech and Rad's mechanical brakes.
Maybe a little bit better, but you won't go like "wow, this is much better"

The only benefit of JuinTech is ease of installation.
You can avoid mild inconvenience of installing Shimano full hydraulic. And it is a mild inconvenience because you only have to do the installation once.
JuinTech is more expensive and it is still not a full hydraulic.
 

Terry777

Active Member
I think if you’re taking your 2 kids aboard you won’t be needing brakes that will stop you easily from + 30mph buddy or whatever. I think as someone else suggested, give it a whirl and see how you feel. Any modern brakes on a bike from a good reputable reliable manufacturer will be more than enough.
Good luck however you go 👍
 

McCorby

Well-Known Member
Me personally, no.
It will still be exposed to wire friction and cable adjustments. (because the wire will still stretch)

If you go on YouTube and check out the channel called CitizenCycle, they tested that brake on RadRover.
He pretty much said there's not much difference between JuinTech and Rad's mechanical brakes.
Maybe a little bit better, but you won't go like "wow, this is much better"

The only benefit of JuinTech is ease of installation.
You can avoid mild inconvenience of installing Shimano full hydraulic. And it is a mild inconvenience because you only have to do the installation once.
JuinTech is more expensive and it is still not a full hydraulic.
Have you ridden a bike with mechanical hydraulic disk brakes? In my opinion, they perform much better than mechanical disk brakes. I only needed to adjust the cables once after initial cable stretch when new. The key to good performance is using quality compression-less cable housings (See link below). How much do you want to bet CitizenCycle used the original cable housings that came on his bike?

Note: I only have experience with the TRP brakes. I have no experience with the JuinTech.

 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
After some research, and recomendations from here, I am thinking about going with the JuinTech M1 and keeping the wires rather than going into full hydaulic. I know it is not perfect but at least I will get the smoth braking and not worry about adjusting the brakes every 20 miles or so. Do you think that is still worth it?
you would savew money by going to a shop and having them change over to full hydraulic they would be easier to deal with.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Have you ridden a bike with mechanical hydraulic disk brakes? In my opinion, they perform much better than mechanical disk brakes. I only needed to adjust the cables once after initial cable stretch when new. The key to good performance is using quality compression-less cable housings (See link below). How much do you want to bet CitizenCycle used the original cable housings that came on his bike?

Note: I only have experience with the TRP brakes. I have no experience with the JuinTech.

Yes I have, in fact, my bike came with mechanical brakes and later upgraded to hydraulic.
I originally had Shimano BR-M375 and later upgraded to Tektro E715.

Maybe it was because I ride it on daily basis, but the cable will start to give some friction especially after riding in the rain a few times or riding in slightly muddy area.

For me, it made a huge difference.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Oops I just re-read your post, you said "mechanical hydraulic" brakes.

No, I have not used JuinTech, but the other thing that I noticed was that, full hydraulic brakes come with nice and compact brake levers because it requires less effort.

I also do not like cable friction.
In my experience, pretty much every bike has noticeable cable friction especially for rear brake (because the cable is longer for rear, inevitably giving more friction).
 

McCorby

Well-Known Member
Oops I just re-read your post, you said "mechanical hydraulic" brakes.

No, I have not used JuinTech, but the other thing that I noticed was that, full hydraulic brakes come with nice and compact brake levers because it requires less effort.

I also do not like cable friction.
In my experience, pretty much every bike has noticeable cable friction especially for rear brake (because the cable is longer for rear, inevitably giving more friction).
I totally agree that full hydraulic will give the best performance. But if they don’t want to have to deal with finding hydraulic levers with motor inhibitors or having to bleed the system due to routing the rear brake hose through the frame, mechanical hydraulic is a good option.

The cable housing I linked above was designed to be very low friction btw.... The lever effort on my analog gravel bike’s rear brake feels no different than the front. Overall lever effort is about the same as my ebike‘s Shimano hydraulic brakes.
 

ZiZiL

New Member
Region
USA
you would savew money by going to a shop and having them change over to full hydraulic they would be easier to deal with.

Actually not easier and not cheaper either. Here is my options:

1) Order the JuinTech M1 for $149 and install them. I can do the installation just fine because they are very easy to do. End of story.
2) Order Shimano 355/365 series brakes. The kit is $120 bucks. The issue is that the tube is not long enough to get to the rear end on RadWagon. So the tube needs to be removed and replaced with a long one and bleed the system. I called two bike shops and they told me they can do both brake instalation with tube replacement for $140 bucks. Thus, we are looking at total of $260 bucks to get them done.

This is a $110 difference which I doubt worth it. I can spend that money towards a controller upgrade kit to be honest. That is my thinking so far.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I totally agree that full hydraulic will give the best performance. But if they don’t want to have to deal with finding hydraulic levers with motor inhibitors or having to bleed the system due to routing the rear brake hose through the frame, mechanical hydraulic is a good option.

The cable housing I linked above was designed to be very low friction btw.... The lever effort on my analog gravel bike’s rear brake feels no different than the front. Overall lever effort is about the same as my ebike‘s Shimano hydraulic brakes.
Did you see the link above?

I already provided the link to full hydraulic kit, so they would not have to find a lever.. the lever and caliper are both included in full hydraulic kit.

Full hydraulic kit: $120 and includes levers and calipers
JuinTech cable hydraulic: $150 and caliper only

To me, it's a no brainer. Full hydraulic wins.
I know that it will cause one-time-only mild inconvenience of brake lever installation, cable routing and all that, but for cheaper price and better performance, it's well worth it.
And possibility of switching to longer hydraulic line for RadWagon, because RadRover one might be (or very likley be) to short for rear one.

As you suggested, I know JuinTech is easier to install, but if you have to switch it to high quality cable line, that adds more labour and cost.
Which means, I personally think it is worth considering just going for full hydraulic.
 

ZiZiL

New Member
Region
USA
@Timpo I do not undserstand why you think it is cheaper to install full hydraulic on RadWagon. See my post above. It is not cheaper. It almost cost double to instal full system vs caliper only due to tube replacement and bleed. The bike shop told me that the tube will cost me 40 bucks alone.