I Am Seeing A Lot Of New Ebikes With No Front Suspension

iabob

Member
I did thousands of miles on a road bike in my younger years, and when I decided to buy an e-bike this year a test rode a bunch. I don’t think the vibration and bumps of an unsuspended fork would prevent me from doing a 50 mile ride, the human body is pretty darn good at handling it. But due to the comfort of a quality suspended fork, I wouldn’t even consider a rigid now. Maybe in warm weather climates where the roads don’t go through numerous freeze-thaw cycles every year...maybe those areas have glass smooth roads. I’m in a 4 seasons climate and the difference in comfort between rigid and suspended forks was significant.
 

Coolbob

Active Member
I've never owned a bike suspension of any kind. I bought my first mountain bike in 1983, a Ross Force 1 and I don't recall any bikes with suspension being available at the time. As time went by some of my riding buddies started adding suspension forks to their bikes or upgrading to bikes with suspension forks. I contemplated the extra couple of pounds of weight and watched them lube and rebuild their forks and decided it wasn't for me. In 1999 I had to order a Canondale M400 from my local bike store because all they had in stock were suspension bikes.

I've only put a bit over 500 miles on my Momentum Transend E+ and not once have I wished it had a suspension, nor do wish to add an isolation stem or seat post. But I'm weird that way, every car I have owned between 1978 and 2012 had a manual transmission. Eventually rigid bikes may go the way of manual transmissions and I'll have to buy one. 🤷‍♂️


Addendum - I apologize to anyone who may have interpreted my comments as judgmental, that was not my intention. I am just sharing my preference for the simplicity and clean look of a rigid bike. Those same preferences led me to a bike with an internal battery and an internal geared hub. I should also mention that I rarely wear Lycra and I am not a member of any LBS Secret Society that looks down on anyone who can't ride a 100-miles before lunch. I'm just an old fart who likes to ride my bike. :p
 
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antboy

Well-Known Member
I've only put a bit over 500 miles on my Momentum Transend E+ and not once have I wished it had a suspension, nor do wish to add an isolation stem or seat post. But I'm weird that way, every car I have owned between 1978 and 2012 had a manual transmission. Eventually rigid bikes may go the way of manual transmissions and I'll have to buy one. 🤷‍♂️
The one thing I'd say about a suspension stem/seatpost is that there are probably people who THINK they need a front suspension, when a post and/or stem will be more than enough, without compromising the rigid fork feel.

I don't think rigid forks will ever go away. Too many people know the benefits of them. To each their own.

Though it's interesting that you mention manual transmission, but have a bike with an IGH, not that there's anything wrong with that. :)
 

iabob

Member
The one thing I'd say about a suspension stem/seatpost is that there are probably people who THINK they need a front suspension, when a post and/or stem will be more than enough, without compromising the rigid fork feel.

I don't think rigid forks will ever go away. Too many people know the benefits of them. To each their own.

Though it's interesting that you mention manual transmission, but have a bike with an IGH, not that there's anything wrong with that. :)
There are also people who think they know what’s going on in others heads and judge them as not making informed decisions by claiming they only think they know what they want. It is possible that some of us do know the advantages (and disadvantages) of a rigid fork, are aware of the different posts and stems available, have tried them, and have made an informed decision that’s different than yours. “To each their own” should be an acknowledgement of that.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
The one thing I'd say about a suspension stem/seatpost is that there are probably people who THINK they need a front suspension, when a post and/or stem will be more than enough, without compromising the rigid fork feel.

I don't think rigid forks will ever go away. Too many people know the benefits of them. To each their own.

Though it's interesting that you mention manual transmission, but have a bike with an IGH, not that there's anything wrong with that. :)
Please consider that's your opinion, and there is NO RIGHT OR WRONG here. Consider for instance, there's likely a reason both types are on the market.....
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
As I read this thread I felt like I was the bike shop where the tech would look down his nose at my non Lycra wearing body while looking twice as hard at my cheating ebike! Until the last couple of posts.
I guess my over 5gs of bike spending ( while waiting for almost 20gs of bikes to be built) and avg of 80 miles or more per ride every other day makes me a non bike rider because I like having a suspension front....to each their own....
 

antboy

Well-Known Member
Please consider that's your opinion, and there is NO RIGHT OR WRONG here. Consider for instance, there's likely a reason both types are on the market.....
Of COURSE it's just my opinion. That's why I said "to each their own". We all have different needs/wants for our bike(s). :)
 

Ken M

Well-Known Member
If you are a mamby pamby get a suspension fork. If you enjoy serious ebike riding go rigid (you can improve comfort with a more upright position (less weight on your arms) and having larger air volume tires which also improve handling given the larger contact patch).
 

Ebiker33

Well-Known Member
If you are a mamby pamby get a suspension fork. If you enjoy serious ebike riding go rigid (you can improve comfort with a more upright position (less weight on your arms) and having larger air volume tires which also improve handling given the larger contact patch).
Those are some great tips, so cruiser style swept back handles with fatty tires.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Those are some great tips, so cruiser style swept back handles with fatty tires.
Ken is a die hard commuter with a die hard commuter only viewpoint. The rest of us are all "mamby pamby's". He doesn't say, but I'm betting his idea of tires "having larger air volume" are still less than 2" in width.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
If you are a mamby pamby get a suspension fork. If you enjoy serious ebike riding go rigid (you can improve comfort with a more upright position (less weight on your arms) and having larger air volume tires which also improve handling given the larger contact patch).
a more upright position is not great for longer rides and fat tires take more effort to move. I much rather have my suspension fork and and ride my bike like aa regular bike 9000 miles in a year now.
 

iabob

Member
If you are a mamby pamby get a suspension fork. If you enjoy serious ebike riding go rigid (you can improve comfort with a more upright position (less weight on your arms) and having larger air volume tires which also improve handling given the larger contact patch).
And we’re back to the condescension, judgment, and snobbery.
 

Code54

Member
A LOT has to do with where you live and ride. I am sure some of you would consider the roads near me a "trail", one lane, tons of holes, road breaking away into the ditch, etc... There are days I dont take my Vado 4 with a front suspension and I do take my full suspension mountain bike, it is just easier. If I go to town some places you have to jump curbs and ride a few rough areas so the front suspension sure does help even on the Vado.
 

Kayakguy

Active Member
Yeah I don't think humans have great understanding of speed on wheels. We are so used to going fast in our cars and such that we think 30 is a crawl. The difference, I suspect, between a crash at 20 and a crash at 30 is, if not exponential, would be at least double. Adrenaline is a dangerous drug. Very addictive to some personality types.
I admit to being an adrenaline junky. Fortunately, I am very easily frightened.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I like to think I have a good understanding of speed on two wheels having ridden bicycles and motorcycles most of my life. Maybe that’s why I don’t want a class 3 ebike. I go well over 30 descending several hills almost every time I go on a regular ride and while I do get an adrenaline rush almost every time, I’m always conscience of the fact that at 66+ yrs old, I’m a hell of a lot more fragile these days and a lot more sensitive to pain.😬
I think the sense of speed would depend on what bike you're riding though.

Imagine going 30mph on a RadMini ... and going 30mph on Honda Goldwing.
30mph is nothing on Goldwing.. and I don't know who would get an adrenaline rush on Honda Goldwing at 30mph.
 

Latitude

Well-Known Member
Rigid aluminum fork on my Urban Rush. I have the Redshift stem and seat post. Both are wonderful. It's given me a lot of comfort without much of the weight penalty of a suspension fork. I do take this bike where it shouldn't go like gnarly single track but I don't do that at speed. I do have a lot of opportunity to go 35 MPH+ on my hilly commute and could do that confidently even when the bike was stock.
Sounds like something I might have said.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Thanks AHicks. Good points.
Actually I switched tires last summer. Now running Schwalbe G-One 2.25 inches. They can be run as low as 26 lbs. Made a big difference!
They are a little noisy but that’s because the Brose motor is super quiet in comparison.
In the long run, I’ll probably keep the original front fork. It has almost 4000 mi (6437 km). And I love the bike! ❤️ 🚴🏾‍♂️😎
In agreement with many of the comments regarding quality of front forks. My Vado has a basic spring front fork that has almost zero help.
I’m thinking of switching it to a non suspension fork simply to save some weight when hauling the beast. More research needed.

Hi Marci jo,
Have you considered adding a suspension stem like the Redshift shock stop?
It's designed to increase comfort by smoothing out the smaller road vibrations.
You could keep your suspension fork for the large hits and add the Redshift stem. ShockStop Suspension Stem – Redshift Sports
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Timpo

Well-Known Member
Hi Marci jo,
Have you considered adding a suspension stem like the Redshift shock stop?
It's designed to increase comfort by smoothing out the smaller road vibrations.
You could keep your suspension fork for the large hits and add the Redshift stem. ShockStop Suspension Stem – Redshift Sports
View attachment 75247 View attachment 75248
or Kinekt

 

goldconch

Active Member
I might be able to bunny hop over a couple surprise pot holes, but a series of road hazards at 25+ mph closure, boxed-in with traffic, and I find myself longing for full-hydraulic disk brakes AND an adjustable/lockout front air suspension - preferably magnesium. I was almost taken out yesterday by a random chicken that decided to cross the road. 🐔
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
I might be able to bunny hop over a couple surprise pot holes, but a series of road hazards at 25+ mph closure, boxed-in with traffic, and I find myself longing for full-hydraulic disk brakes AND an adjustable/lockout front air suspension - preferably magnesium. I was almost taken out yesterday by a random chicken that decided to cross the road. 🐔
A chicken chicken or a chicken**** cyclist with a suspension? 😜