I am thinking of buying a Trek Verve + ?

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
I have a chance to buy a Trek Verve + at a low price. I will have the bike to demo until Friday and then I must decide. Anybody who has one is welcome to input their experiences with this model in particular or the Active line motor in general ?
 

e-boy

Well-Known Member
Your asking about the Verve + , not the Verve +2 ?
What's the price ?
What are your impressions ?

I've ridden them both .
The Active Line drive is near silent , silky smooth , and delivers a very gentle power curve with low torque .
I find the ride anemic and unspirited . It can climb hills but I think the bike was designed for the flat paths .
And with a non-suspension fork the ride can be jarring on anything less than smooth pavement .
The Verve + has an issue with the fenders rattling ; this was corrected on the Verve +2 .
Having said that , if you search the forums you'll find many happy owners of the Verve's .
I really wanted to buy the Verve +2 ! I think even at list price of $2500 it can be considered a good value .
It's relatively light weight and the build quality is top notch , as is Trek's service . And the bike comes with a rear rack , lights , and fenders .
Comfortable upright riding position and a stable geometry .
I'm ok with the 20mph limit and the 400w/hr battery .
But at 40Nm torque , the Active Line drive is underpowered for my style of riding and needs .
I'm looking forward to trying the Verve +3 .
 

dblhelix

Well-Known Member
I have a chance to buy a Trek Verve + at a low price. I will have the bike to demo until Friday and then I must decide. Anybody who has one is welcome to input their experiences with this model in particular or the Active line motor in general ?
My Vektron has an ActiveLine motor. If it were on a heavy R&M, I’d probably be underwhelmed, but on the 49lb Vektron it’s well-suited for commuting and as a back-up bike. It’s not exciting, but it’s quiet and dependable. Despite the 20 mph cutoff and less power, I’ve taken the bike for 70 mile rides. I’ve found that in a second bike, I don’t mind the cutoff or the Purion, just to name two things people complain about.
 

JohnRC

Member
Hi Steve.
I live near where you ride and take pictures. We might meet up sometime.
I too have been testing and reading all I can about the Verve. What I like most is that it is one of the lightest ebikes at around 45 lbs. I can get the upright position I want on it. No front forks is ok with me but I do have the Kinect suspension seat post. Love it! Saves my neck.
What I want for the Verve is a 500w/hr battery. I am waiting to find out if the shop will exchange it and the cost.
I agree with e-boy. It could use more power. In the last two weeks I have ridden the Giant Quick e+, Como and Cube touring. The Quick E has WOW power-very addictive and fun. It has great brakes but it would take $’s to make it comfortable enough for me. But then it might not work out.
The Como and Cube are in between the Verve and Giant in power. For me the Como is more comfortable but more money.
 
I have a chance to buy a Trek Verve + at a low price. I will have the bike to demo until Friday and then I must decide. Anybody who has one is welcome to input their experiences with this model in particular or the Active line motor in general ?
Hello Steve,
Got a 2019 Verve+ about 3 months ago for general recreation. It fits my needs wonderfully. Paid 2K and added a rear rack and bag, plus two side mirrors. I test rode 4 different bikes, and the Verve has the smallest motor. I was worried about the lack of power, but it has not been an issue for me, even on some good extended inclines. I am not in great shape but have never struggled or felt I needed more boost.

If I stay mainly on flat paved trails, I average about 60 miles on a charge, mostly staying in ECO. On a fairly steep climb (400 feet in about 1.5 miles), I was able to maintain 7-10 mph and was one level below Turbo for the most part.

The positives for me are the weight at just under 50lbs with rack, the intuitive feel of the bike, I did not like the feeling of being pushed or pulled with hub drives. Changing gears and levels of PAS feels natural and makes me feel like a stronger cyclist. I like the simplicity of the Purion display. I got the bracket to mount my cell phone and didn’t want to use an APP to track my riding info which would drain my cell battery. The front integrated headlight is nice, bright and can’t accidentally hit it. I keep the tires at 60psi, they cushion well and at times on flats and of course downhill, I power the PAS totally off. Heavier bikes I test ride I could not do that without struggling.

The only negatives in my opinion is the tail light is too small, and yes the ride can be a bit jarring if the surface is bumpy, but the grips with the palm support greatly help. I would not recommend for extended rough surfaces or dirt trails unless very hard packed and smooth.

Lastly, my local Trek dealer has been very helpful and responsive to my newbie questions, and they offer several workshops for learning how to maintain your bike. Also really liked the Giant Lafree with belt drive, but I couldn’t get a good deal and was about $500.00 more. The display was also not a digital readout. Good luck on whatever you decide on!!
 

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
Hello Steve,
Got a 2019 Verve+ about 3 months ago for general recreation. It fits my needs wonderfully. Paid 2K and added a rear rack and bag, plus two side mirrors. I test rode 4 different bikes, and the Verve has the smallest motor. I was worried about the lack of power, but it has not been an issue for me, even on some good extended inclines. I am not in great shape but have never struggled or felt I needed more boost.

If I stay mainly on flat paved trails, I average about 60 miles on a charge, mostly staying in ECO. On a fairly steep climb (400 feet in about 1.5 miles), I was able to maintain 7-10 mph and was one level below Turbo for the most part.

The positives for me are the weight at just under 50lbs with rack, the intuitive feel of the bike, I did not like the feeling of being pushed or pulled with hub drives. Changing gears and levels of PAS feels natural and makes me feel like a stronger cyclist. I like the simplicity of the Purion display. I got the bracket to mount my cell phone and didn’t want to use an APP to track my riding info which would drain my cell battery. The front integrated headlight is nice, bright and can’t accidentally hit it. I keep the tires at 60psi, they cushion well and at times on flats and of course downhill, I power the PAS totally off. Heavier bikes I test ride I could not do that without struggling.

The only negatives in my opinion is the tail light is too small, and yes the ride can be a bit jarring if the surface is bumpy, but the grips with the palm support greatly help. I would not recommend for extended rough surfaces or dirt trails unless very hard packed and smooth.

Lastly, my local Trek dealer has been very helpful and responsive to my newbie questions, and they offer several workshops for learning how to maintain your bike. Also really liked the Giant Lafree with belt drive, but I couldn’t get a good deal and was about $500.00 more. The display was also not a digital readout. Good luck on whatever you decide on!!
Greg,
You mentioned the ride is a bit jarring.
Consider adding a suspension seat post. Many comments on this forum regarding how much difference in ride comfort they add.
 

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
Steve,
I think it depends what you already have. If you are used to more torque and a speed pedelec, it will feel underpowered. That said, all the Verve owners in my cycling club LOVE their Verves.
And there’s alot to be said for its 45 lb weight especially if you tend to haul it.
If it’s a great price, then I say go for it.
 

Rick53

Active Member
Love not having an LCD display on my ebike .
Although I do miss aare you ? In
n odometer .
Can you relate your experience? I would go rid it 20-30 miles and see what happens : Kinda hard to give you advice without knowing your abilities I see there's a comment about average speed 7-10 MPH . The verve + is a great Bike : You can't do better in a class 1 level Bike for 2400.00 : I would base whether to buy it on whether the class 1 is enough for you: If you get a good enough deal such as 1/2 price Buy it . Learn on it and then sell it : Depending on what you pay : It's likely if it's a good deal you can use it awhile and re-sale with no loss :
 

e-boy

Well-Known Member
An LCD can be a distraction while riding and also one more thing to be tampered with when the bike is parked at a rack .
But I do miss a running odometer .
And I liked the LCD on the Verve +2 , so no big deal .

I wear an Apple Watch and can get some data from that if I want .
 

e-boy

Well-Known Member
Steve,
I think it depends what you already have. If you are used to more torque and a speed pedelec, it will feel underpowered. That said, all the Verve owners in my cycling club LOVE their Verves.
And there’s alot to be said for its 45 lb weight especially if you tend to haul it.
If it’s a great price, then I say go for it.
It feels underpowered even for a Class 1 . But if it works for your style of riding , on your terrain , in your conditions , it's a great bike even at full list price .
 
Greg,
You mentioned the ride is a bit jarring.
Consider adding a suspension seat post. Many comments on this forum regarding how much difference in ride comfort they add.
I will definitely look into that but where I feel the most impact when hitting ruts is in my wrists but the grips do help to an extent but I definitely don’t want front suspension.
 

PatriciaK

Well-Known Member
If I were looking at FULL price for the Verve+, I would get the Giant La Free E+2 instead - it's hundreds of dollars less than the Verve. My reasoning is, if I were going to settle for having a mid drive with a chain instead of a belt, I would get the bike with more oomph on hills (I live in a very hilly area!). The Verve, at full price, is comparable to the La Free E+1, which has a belt drive. So, if I were going to spend that kind of money, I'd get the bike with the belt drive.

That said, I read that owners are happy with their Verves - you just have to ride it and see what you think, and see if the price is worth the lack of power.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
Your asking about the Verve + , not the Verve +2 ?
What's the price ?
What are your impressions ?

I've ridden them both .
The Active Line drive is near silent , silky smooth , and delivers a very gentle power curve with low torque .
I find the ride anemic and unspirited . It can climb hills but I think the bike was designed for the flat paths .
And with a non-suspension fork the ride can be jarring on anything less than smooth pavement .
The Verve + has an issue with the fenders rattling ; this was corrected on the Verve +2 .
Having said that , if you search the forums you'll find many happy owners of the Verve's .
I really wanted to buy the Verve +2 ! I think even at list price of $2500 it can be considered a good value .
It's relatively light weight and the build quality is top notch , as is Trek's service . And the bike comes with a rear rack , lights , and fenders .
Comfortable upright riding position and a stable geometry .
I'm ok with the 20mph limit and the 400w/hr battery .
But at 40Nm torque , the Active Line drive is underpowered for my style of riding and needs .
I'm looking forward to trying the Verve +3 .
Thanks Eboy. It is a Verve + . Now that you mention the fenders ,I did notice the fenders are very close to the tires. I have only ridden it 5 k bringing it home last night but I did not hear any rattles yet.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
My Vektron has an ActiveLine motor. If it were on a heavy R&M, I’d probably be underwhelmed, but on the 49lb Vektron it’s well-suited for commuting and as a back-up bike. It’s not exciting, but it’s quiet and dependable. Despite the 20 mph cutoff and less power, I’ve taken the bike for 70 mile rides. I’ve found that in a second bike, I don’t mind the cutoff or the Purion, just to name two things people complain about.
Thanks Dblhelix. Yes this bike is around 45 lbs and that is a big part of what attracts me to it as a second bike.
 

Browneye

Well-Known Member
It feels underpowered even for a Class 1 . But if it works for your style of riding , on your terrain , in your conditions , it's a great bike even at full list price .
^^This. It's a Trek, so there ya go, can't miss.

But if it were me I would be going for the latest 2020 version. It's enough updated to be worth it - fenders are better, comes with a suspension seatpost, lights, rack, very refined.
I only test rode one, liked it, but wanted to try others. I fell in love with the yamaha drive system and the Giant Explore had more of what I wanted in a ebike - suspension fork, more power, a little more performance, and I didn't need or want full fenders. That it was a couple of hundred less was just a bonus (2019 model discount). The newer Trek satin bronze color is also very attractive, subtle.

IMO the yamaha drive is every bit as refined as the bosch unit in the Trek, and nearly double the power. That said, I had no trouble getting the Verve to the speed limiter in the lbs parking lot. It works just fine.

And also IMO, you can't miss with anything from the big-3 - Trek, Giant, or Specialized. They're all top of the line with good factory backing and reliability.

As an aside, the Explore+3 or 4 come with gravel tires, so the first thing I did was change mine out for Schwalbe Marathons - 47-622's which are 1.75" wide. Nice tires, but still a bit skinny for an ebike. So I ordered out a Big Apple set in 2.35 and installed them last night, they are awesome. A little tricky to squeeze onto the front 19mm wide rim, but fit perfectly nonetheless, just enough room in the chain stays - the rear rim is 25mm with eyeleted spoke nipples, so they really beefed up the rear wheel on this model. My hunch is these will be super plush. Pics later. ;)
 
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steve mercier

Well-Known Member
I will definitely look into that but where I feel the most impact when hitting ruts is in my wrists but the grips do help to an extent but I definitely don’t want front suspension.
Greg This bike comes with a suspension seat post and I assume yours does too? Is it sufficient ?