I hope that Haibike is here to stay...

GypsyTreker

Well-Known Member
Excellent take!

Many years ago, early 80's, I worked for a Scandanvian company. When I was there on business the thing I realized quite quickly was how misunderstood our Country actually was. The size was not something easy to comprehend unless a road trip was part of a trip over here, the other was the extreme diversity of our citizens as to their wants, likes, needs etc. giving a skewed view, depending on which group they might have encountered during a visit here. I am not saying the same misunderstanding does not occur from our take on countries or people other than ourselves (so few of us travel) But if you paint our country with a simplified explanation of who and how we are and your wrong, you just blew a huge marketing opportunity. Haibike might have done that. Are we back "on topic"? :)
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Thank you for your extensive answer Mike. It gave me a better understanding of the U.S. reality.

I'd like just to point out Haibike probably make ten times more money or even more in the European (especially German) market with 4 million of e-bikes in Germany alone (restricted to 25 km/h). They don't need the U.S. market until a better business opportunity comes. Europe has basically avoided the Chinese imports making the European e-bike industry strong (it does not matter many parts are Chinese).

I don't want to describe how strong bicycle infrastructure has been built all around Europe; you must be aware of that. Talking about Poland, the Polish would love riding e-bikes but most of them cannot afford an e-bike. Acoustic bikes are ridden en masse here.

To give you some understanding and taking an occasion for telling you an anecdote:
I used to be an avid commuter and recreational cyclist when bicycles were not fashionable in Poland, I'm talking 1970s - 1990s. I was 34 in 1995, and had no car at that time. I used to commute to work in Warsaw on a bike (I had a steel road bike at that time). People could see me, "an old fart riding a bicycle" while bikes where appropriate for kids and young teenagers at those times; they actually laughed at my sight. One day, on return from work, I rode in a large roundabout. A policeman standing on the curb jeered at me:

-- Do you have the "bicycle card"?
-- A driving license here! -- I replied with laughter.

The "bicycle card" was a document proving a kid got training in the rules of the road. The policeman's question was an insult. That was the state of the mind in Poland in 1990s. Nowadays the cyclists are a strong power here. You wouldn't believe how strong. So called "Masa Rowerowa" (Bicycle Mass) rallies of the cycling lobbyists used to paralyse traffic in Warsaw many times until the authorities understood that power.
 
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GypsyTreker

Well-Known Member
Thank you for your extensive answer Mike. It gave me a better understanding of the U.S. reality.

I'd like just to point out Haibike probably make ten times more money or even more in the European (especially German) market with 4 million of e-bikes in Germany alone (restricted to 25 km/h). They don't need the U.S. market until a better business opportunity comes. Europe has basically avoided the Chinese imports making the European e-bike industry strong (it does not matter many parts are Chinese).

I don't want to describe how strong bicycle infrastructure has been built all around Europe; you must be aware of that. Talking about Poland, the Polish would love riding e-bikes but most of them cannot afford an e-bike. Acoustic bikes are ridden en masse here.

To give you some understanding and taking an occasion for telling you an anecdote:
I used to be an avid commuter and recreational cyclist when bicycles were not fashionable in Poland, I'm talking 1970s - 1990s. I was 34 in 1995, and had no car at that time. I used to commute to work in Warsaw on a bike (I had a steel road bike at that time). People could see me, "an old fart riding a bicycle" while bikes where appropriate for kids and young teenagers at those times; they actually laughed at my sight. One day, on return from work, I rode in a large roundabout. A policeman standing on the curb jeered at me:

-- Do you have the "bicycle card"?
-- A driving license here! -- I replied with laughter.

The "bicycle card" was a document proving a kid got training in the rules of the road. The policeman's question was an insult. That was the state of the mind in Poland in 1990s. Nowadays the cyclists are a strong power here. You wouldn't believe how strong. So called "Masa Rowerowa" (Bicycle Mass) rallies of the cycling lobbyists used to paralyse traffic in Warsaw many times until the authorities understood that power.

Perhaps the EU should focus on the US as an emerging market and ramp up their strategies along that model. No doubt Europe has advanced beyond the USA when it comes to integration. Our city planners and lawmakers could use some advise. I feel it's a worthy investment in time and energy. Then again, perhaps the market is not required here and we will bump along and an entrepreneur (s) from the USA will figure it out for us, scale it up and millions here will see the benefits of eBiking.
 

moshe47

New Member
I just bought a Haibike 2020 Allmtn 2.0 from a local dealership In Ohio. They don't stock Haibikes but its the same distributor. They have sold 7 other Haibikes in the last few years and have a lot of experience with Yamaha motors in Giant ebikes.
 

TMH

Well-Known Member
I just bought a Haibike 2020 Allmtn 2.0 from a local dealership In Ohio. They don't stock Haibikes but its the same distributor. They have sold 7 other Haibikes in the last few years and have a lot of experience with Yamaha motors in Giant ebikes.
Congrats. I've got one of the older AllMtn 2.0's and it is a great bike. Seems like the Yamaha motors are some of the most reliable on the market.
 

smorgasbord

Well-Known Member
I just got an email from Haibike about the new "Flyons" with the "HPR 120S motor with 120 Nm of torque," so it's definitely the TQ.

The bad news is the link sends me to haibike.com, and neither US nor Canada is listed.

If I go to haibikeusa.com, they only show the Yamaha motor versions.

So, doesn't look for potential North American buyers.
 

E-BikeAdvocate

New Member
Haibikes are great bikes. I hope more Americans start buying them so that Haibike will want to have a larger and more sustained presence in America.
Haibike does make good bikes and I hope that they do stay in the North American retail market. The more retailer names/competition, the better for the customer. That being said, I still wonder Haibike will remain here. They were late to release their 2020 models. If you look on their US website from the past years to now, it would reveal that Hiabike has had far more models to choose from. If you visit the Haibike Europe website you would find far greater numbers of models offered. My perception is that Haibike and their sister bike names just were not performing to cooperate expectations. I just guessing that last years sale performance had that left Haibike with excess stock, that lead to the late 2020 releases. I get the feeling that cooperate heads have decided to give it one last chance on a smaller scale.
Just to make clear. I have no hard facts. I own two Haibikes. I'm not a hater, I have no ax to grind. I hope Haibike will stay and flourish in North America.
 

moshe47

New Member
Which Haibikes do you own and what do you think about them? 2 months ago I bought the Xduro Allmtn 2.0. I bought my bike through Century Cycles in Medina, Ohio for $4,200. It has a Yari fork, Rockshox Deluxe + shock, and Sram NX, Maxxis Minion DHF & DHR2 tires, a Yamaha PW-X2 motor, and a dropper post. The frame and other components are well built. How can you beat that? With most other brands you have to spend $5,500 to $6,500 to get this level of quality.
 

CityExplorer

Well-Known Member
Which Haibikes do you own and what do you think about them? 2 months ago I bought the Xduro Allmtn 2.0. I bought my bike through Century Cycles in Medina, Ohio for $4,200. It has a Yari fork, Rockshox Deluxe + shock, and Sram NX, Maxxis Minion DHF & DHR2 tires, a Yamaha PW-X2 motor, and a dropper post. The frame and other components are well built. How can you beat that? With most other brands you have to spend $5,500 to $6,500 to get this level of quality.
Sounds great. I don't know much about Haibike, but the people that created it certainly know a lot about bikes and I respect that.
 

E-BikeAdvocate

New Member
I have a HardNine 1.0 that I use on fire roads and light trails. My other bike is the Urban S 5.0 that is a ridged speed pedelec (class 3). Since November I the only time that I drive a car is when I'm with a passenger. I'm into the speed of class 3 bikes. I haven't ridden the Specialized Turbo Vado or the Vado CL, but both of those bikes have my attention.
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
I own the 2018 Sduro Full Seven 10.0 with Yamaha drive. I have no complaints at all. Great performer and the reliability is very satisfying. Hope they stay in N/A also. Just a great all around product IMO. Cheers to everyone that own their E-bikes! :) 👍