Interceptor VS. City Commuter?

Kaldeem

Active Member
I'm confused. On the Pedego website, it has a comparision chart. The interceptor says it's "All around" while the City Commuter says "Commuting". Yes I understand the obviousness of it, but spec wise, they are the same bike, some minor difference like tire/rim size and fenders... but the motor's 500w are the same.

I like the look of the City commuter, but I'm curious if there is more information I'm missing between the two of them that will make a difference in my decision.

Yes, I test drove them both, and I can't recall a real difference except the handle bars... I hate the super wide cruiser bar on the interceptor.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Different geometries -- City Commuter is more upright while Interceptor is a cruiser type. Different frames. I think it just depends on your preference and what feels more comfortable. Not sure if there is a weight difference or not.
 

GatorBob

Member
I hate the super wide cruiser bar on the interceptor.

The handlebars are the only shortcoming of my 2015 Interceptor III. It's a very comfortable, powerful, fun bike, although a bit large. Unfortunately I was not given a choice of handlebars when I ordered mine online and changing them out is a piece of work. I have no nearby e-bike dealer.
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
Yes, it is tedious; its a popular upgrade many customers like- different bars and/or stem when they want an adjustable handlebar. Cool thing, with those wide cruiser bars you'll have enough wiring harness to make the change, just be careful with the tiny 2.5 & 3mm inset screws, they're easy to strip. Post a pic with handlebar description when you're done. Sometimes that's the main change to make a bike just right.
 

Kaldeem

Active Member
I'll be honest here, I want a city commuter, but I had seen a YouTube video linked HERE. Where the bike has a Rockshox front suspension and a SL-K carbon mountain bike handlebar. It's probably the best custom Pedego city commuter I've ever seen, and it's so sexy and sleek. Only problem is that price. 3295 or something for the 48/15 battery and the upgrades to the stem/handlebar and adding the fork will jump it to probably 4k.

That's when I caught Courts video of the e-Joe Koda, it's has nearly the same specs, but already comes with a more aggressive handlebar and suspension fork. 38v 15ah battery for 2199.00$

Almost seems like a better deal, but I like the Pedego brand and feeling. Ya know, it feels durable, solid. Made for a guy my weight.
 

grench

Well-Known Member
Almost seems like a better deal, but I like the Pedego brand and feeling. Ya know, it feels durable, solid. Made for a guy my weight.
Kaldeem
I was going to stay out of this...but feel like I should share. The Pedegos are nice bikes but far from solid. I rode these bikes several times and felt like I could pull the handlebars off. The frame flexed when I got up on the pedals. Understand I am 300lbs. So I am too heavy for the bike anyway. Compared to the A2b Shima, Stromers (I rode both of these the same days at the same shops with the Pedegos) and several of the BH bikes...the Pedego feels like a small light easy user type of persons bike. By far the most solid feeling frames I have ridden are the Stromers and the Optibikes.

Anyway for what it's worth...

Anyone else care to chime in?
 
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PowerMe

Well-Known Member
I happen to be on the Pedego Owners Facebook page and someone on there reported and showed a picture of their broken frame. She's only had the bike a few months, I think, so at least it's in the warranty period. They are a very brand loyal bunch there and cheer and promote everything Pedego, but every day I read about problems with something on those bikes, be it the controller, the battery, the frame, random loss of power.... they don't seem nearly as bothered about it as I would be. They feel good about their brightly colored cruiser and commuter bikes, but my impression is Pedegos have an older demographic user.
 

Kaldeem

Active Member
Interesting. Thank you for the honest feedback. I've seen the fanboi Pedego owners around and on FB too. I've personally never heard of the issues mentioned, but I would assume that they are legit as every bike, ebike, manufacture and basically anything built has it's issues. With that said, and my post from yesterday; the Koda by e-Joe is more in my price range, with no modifications to make and on Courts comparison chart is rated at 350 lb weight limit. Which is right up my alley. Currently I'm 272. lbs. So maybe I'll jump over to the e-Joe forum and see if anyone has picked it up yet. ;) Thanks guys.
 

GatorBob

Member
"The Pedegos are nice bikes but far from solid. I rode these bikes several times and felt like I could pull the handlebars off. The frame flexed when I got up on the pedals. Understand I am 300 lbs."

I am 165 pounds and 5'9" and the bike is rock solid.

" ...every day I read about problems with something on those bikes, be it the controller, the battery, the frame, random loss of power..."

I read everything I find about Pedego and I do not see what you read. Other than my dislike of the ultra wide handlebars, mine has zero issues in 8 months and it's from the initial production run of 2015 Interceptor III's.
 

GatorBob

Member
Yes, it is tedious; its a popular upgrade many customers like- different bars and/or stem when they want an adjustable handlebar. Cool thing, with those wide cruiser bars you'll have enough wiring harness to make the change, just be careful with the tiny 2.5 & 3mm inset screws, they're easy to strip. Post a pic with handlebar description when you're done. Sometimes that's the main change to make a bike just right.

I guess I don't dislike the wide handlebars enough to go to the trouble of changing them. ;=))
 

grench

Well-Known Member
I am 165 pounds and 5'9" and the bike is rock solid.
@GatorBob
I am not trying to dis on your bike. At your weight the bike is fine.
Kaldeem is 272 lbs! At his and my weight we need a more substantial frame. The pedego bikes IMO were not designed for heavy people.

Go test ride an Easy Motion XTreme, a Stomer ST1, A2B Shima, or an Optibike and you will feel the difference in the rigidity of the frame. I just didn't want a big guy to buy a light duty frame. Either way cheers and pedal on.
 

GatorBob

Member
"The pedego bikes IMO were not designed for heavy people."

Perhaps. I bought several recumbent high racers and near-custom "team' hybrids @ $3500-$5000 and every one of their warranties specified no rider over 225 pounds. However, Pedego claims the Interceptor was designed to be a police bike and it looks like a solid, heavy bike. But at 165 pounds, what do I know?
 

flipper

Member
i'm not sure about the wide handlebars on my I3 either. then again, maybe i'm riding wrong or have em set up wrong. is there a different in set up and how-to-ride compared to regular handlebars?
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Here are some actual comments about Pedego issues from owners of Pedegos who have various issues with their bikes. These are from Facebook.


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He's referring to his chain dropping & having to manually put the chain back on.
ped7.JPG
 

GW Shark

Member
Demographically you can look at their ads and see the target audience on their videos. They have a very comfortable bike for flat terrain, just like you would think of for a cruiser. I have talked with the company on the phone and came very close to buying one due to their customer loyalty and overall positivity. My riding has more hills thus in the long run it would not be a good play. It is IMO probably the best cruiser, if that is your ride style. I think there is something to be said about good customer service.
 

GatorBob

Member
Demographically you can look at their ads and see the target audience on their videos. They have a very comfortable bike for flat terrain, just like you would think of for a cruiser. I have talked with the company on the phone and came very close to buying one due to their customer loyalty and overall positivity. My riding has more hills thus in the long run it would not be a good play. It is IMO probably the best cruiser, if that is your ride style. I think there is something to be said about good customer service.
 

GatorBob

Member
FWIW, my Interceptor III is great on the numerous hills in and around my home in Santa Fe NM.

IMO, YMMV, I believe Power me's list of Pedego "issues" would be similar for any similarly priced brand. Some items are truly trivial. To each his/her own, I guess.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
I personally don't consider issues like needing a new controller, having the chain fall off 7 times in 300 miles, the electronics turn off and having to manually ride the bike back home 12 miles, the shifter breaking and being a known problem, and requiring a new battery because the existing one will catch fire to be trivial, but as mentioned, YMMV. At least, GatorBob, you can no longer claim to be unaware of any problems with Pedego bikes. You are now aware and have seen the comments for yourself.

P.S. That isn't my list, it's the list that's on the Pedego Owners Group on Facebook.
 

GatorBob

Member
At least, GatorBob, you can no longer claim to be unaware of any problems with Pedego bikes. You are now aware and have seen the comments for yourself. P.S. That isn't my list, it's the list that's on the Pedego Owners Group on Facebook.

Again, to me a list of issues with any electro-mechanical product and brand is no surprise. My wonderful $55,000 BMW 335i convertible had every fuel injector replaced under warranty at 5,000 miles. So what? If you think a Pedego is especially susceptible to flaws, that's OK, don't buy one. Why would you lobby against Pedego's? One could as easily comment about Pedego's large market share and the many online testimonials to Pedego out-of-the-box quality and dependability of Pedego service and support.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
I'm not lobbying against Pedego, merely providing my sources for what I've read in response to your comment upstream, "I read everything I find about Pedego and I do not see what you read."