Interesting article

Over50

Well-Known Member
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...tric-bike-review-tested-on-the-streets-of-l-a.

I don't really get a lot of traffic that cuts me off in the ST2 S. I did, however, on my Crosscurrent. I'm sure the powerful headlight helps

I was pleased that my local suburb/community recently sent out a mailer aimed at drivers advising us to watch for cyclists. It listed the common types of bike/car accidents and said the "right hook" is one of the most common. Car passes cyclist and then turns into the cyclist path.
 

Dunbar

Well-Known Member
Coastal LA is much more bike friendly than downtown/Hollywood area. As the article mentions commuting up/down the coast is a breeze in LA. You can spend most of your time on dedicated bike paths and not worry about cars. My brother lives in Hollywood and I live near the beach. Whenever I'm over his way I always notice how many fewer bike lanes there are.
 
I was pleased that my local suburb/community recently sent out a mailer aimed at drivers advising us to watch for cyclists. It listed the common types of bike/car accidents and said the "right hook" is one of the most common. Car passes cyclist and then turns into the cyclist path.
In Texas, there are city ordinances in places like Austin and Houston called "Vulnerable Road User Laws" that cover things like people on horseback, mopeds, wheelchairs, utility vehicles and most of all cyclists. The right hook is expressly forbidden as is passing closer than 3 feet or failure to use an adjacent lane to pass if one is available. Unfortunately, very few drivers are even aware that such a law exists and, even if they are, rarely observe the rules. It would be interesting to see how many citations are actually issued by the city for violations of the law.