Introducing Rich from Crazy Lenny's

lilrich

Member
I am Rich Kemnitz currently head tech and former part owner of Crazy Lenny's Ebikes in Madison Wisconsin. This is my second profile on this forum having forgot my credentials for the original. We are one of the largest exclusively electric assist bicycle dealers in the nation. I hold a doctorate in Physics and a masters in mathematics. I have over 50 years on hands experience in various technical fields working for many different private and governmental concerns. I also run a part time business (Rich's Rides) focusing on vehicle design and fabrication since 1972. I have personally assembled close to 10,000 Ebikes and serviced hundreds more of many different brands as well as fabricating many custom machines. Many manufactures consult with me in product development and troubleshooting. I offer my experience and knowledge to this forum to encourage others to experience and enhance their enjoyment of electric assist bikes. Looking towards retirement and exploring other ventures I apologize ahead of time for any delays in replying to questions but invite you to pick my brain. Keep up the good work Court it was nice meeting you in Colorado I wish my health would have allowed me more time. Current projects include designing an affordable private lighter than air craft and various alternate propulsion systems. Thanks for your time and attention.
 
Welcome, lil'Rich,
I'm new to the e-bike world, after test driving one in FL. Loved the feeling as I previously was a 6000 mile a year rider here in MN when working fulltime. Injuries got me sidetracked but looking to get back into it now that I'm retired :)
 

giantroadiebob

New Member
i have a giant road-e bike and the tires that came with it are wearing out and the schwalbe drano performance g 700x32 don't seemed to be made anymore--any suggestion on a replacement tire--also is it possible to go to a 700x28 tire --the bike weights 42 lbs
 

lilrich

Member
700x28 would be fine and available part # 11600756 size 28-622 (700 x 28C) model Durano E HS 464A . Schwalbe lists it for $59 would recommend you replace tube also.
 

irenewg13

Active Member
Message #2

I have an Interceptor, have I gotten the wheel size mixed up...
Is it 24"?

I had a bad fall over a year ago, (not on the bike) and have damaged my left hand/wrist. I haven't ridden my ebike since late fall '16!! So I might have forgotten some details.

Thanks
 

lilrich

Member
I saw your reply in the general no problems see my reply in your inbox and check the sidewall on your tires it will tell you the size. Will say something like 24X2.125 or 26X*** or whatever let me know.
 
I am a fan of Crazy Ray's, you guys have a huge selection and great prices. However when I called I talked to a guy there who insisted hub motors offered more power than direct drive. I told him I had heard the exact opposite and even directed him to my thread on this board as we were on the phone. He had found it and said that he would post his position on hub vs mid drive but he never did that. Strange.
 

lilrich

Member
Crazy Ray's ? I hope you were talking Lenny's.
While in general center drive (bottom bracket) motors deliver more usable power to the ground, especially if you are measuring the torque, they tend to be less powerful themselves (250 & 350 w typical). Due to the mechanical gearing advantages involved by running the motor output through the bicycles gear train they are able to utilize smaller less powerful motors. Hub motors currently come in two flavors direct and geared applying the power directly a more powerful motor is needed due to the inability to change the gearing between the wheel and motor (500w+ typical). There are of course exceptions. There are a few two speed hub motors but to date not commercially widespread for various reasons, as well as very powerful (1000w +) mid drives. Both systems have advantages and disadvantages. In general most mid drives do not offer throttle. For most people without the need for outrageous hill climbing ability a hub motor works great. For off road users a mid drive offers a lot of advantages due to it's ability to handle aggressive hills simply by shifting into a lower mechanical gear. Some riders like the ability to utilize internal hub gearing and belt drive systems with mid drives too, however wear and tear on transmissions designed for human power is much greater. There are always new developments being explored too. Bafang has introduced a bottom bracket system which transmits its power to the wheel utilizing a shaft drive to a 8 speed internally geared rear hub, mainly marketed for the loan bike customers it's robustness and lack of maintenance may bring forth a new paradigm. As far as one of our sales staff not posting to the forum it does not surprise or disappoint me. Our volume of sales (thousands a year) and a small staff preclude most of us from participating in the forums. I was on hiatus from posting for a few years myself, a turn in my health is the only reason I find the time to participate now. While many of our customers have unlimited time and resources to research, debate and mull over even the smallest details of the few models they are interested in, time and resources will not allow us to do so. When a small LBS sells a couple of bikes a month they have the time to debate the merits of tapered spokes and grommets in rims, and their markups reflect that. Our customers expect the best pricing and the only way to achieve that without being a charity is to maintain volume. Unfortunately reality dictates there are only so many hours in a day or lifetime, I gave up being disappointed that others don't spend theirs following my passions. I may be way off base here and probably just rambling now so will follow my doctors advice and actually rest a bit...Keep rolling Rich
 
Crazy Ray's ? I hope you were talking Lenny's.
While in general center drive (bottom bracket) motors deliver more usable power to the ground, especially if you are measuring the torque, they tend to be less powerful themselves (250 & 350 w typical). Due to the mechanical gearing advantages involved by running the motor output through the bicycles gear train they are able to utilize smaller less powerful motors. Hub motors currently come in two flavors direct and geared applying the power directly a more powerful motor is needed due to the inability to change the gearing between the wheel and motor (500w+ typical). There are of course exceptions. There are a few two speed hub motors but to date not commercially widespread for various reasons, as well as very powerful (1000w +) mid drives. Both systems have advantages and disadvantages. In general most mid drives do not offer throttle. For most people without the need for outrageous hill climbing ability a hub motor works great. For off road users a mid drive offers a lot of advantages due to it's ability to handle aggressive hills simply by shifting into a lower mechanical gear. Some riders like the ability to utilize internal hub gearing and belt drive systems with mid drives too, however wear and tear on transmissions designed for human power is much greater. There are always new developments being explored too. Bafang has introduced a bottom bracket system which transmits its power to the wheel utilizing a shaft drive to a 8 speed internally geared rear hub, mainly marketed for the loan bike customers it's robustness and lack of maintenance may bring forth a new paradigm. As far as one of our sales staff not posting to the forum it does not surprise or disappoint me. Our volume of sales (thousands a year) and a small staff preclude most of us from participating in the forums. I was on hiatus from posting for a few years myself, a turn in my health is the only reason I find the time to participate now. While many of our customers have unlimited time and resources to research, debate and mull over even the smallest details of the few models they are interested in, time and resources will not allow us to do so. When a small LBS sells a couple of bikes a month they have the time to debate the merits of tapered spokes and grommets in rims, and their markups reflect that. Our customers expect the best pricing and the only way to achieve that without being a charity is to maintain volume. Unfortunately reality dictates there are only so many hours in a day or lifetime, I gave up being disappointed that others don't spend theirs following my passions. I may be way off base here and probably just rambling now so will follow my doctors advice and actually rest a bit...Keep rolling Rich

You know it may have been Lenny's. Shop in Wisconsin and Florida, is that Lenny's? So sorry to misrepresent the conversation.

So let me ask you as I've gotten conflicting info. When I see specs of a Haibike SDURO 4.0 (Yamaha motor) I see it listed as both 250W and 500W. Can you please clarify? As for the bike I gave it a test ride but there were only moderate hills around and I can not find a place to rent one.

I'm 59, 6'3" 240 pounds and not an avid cycler, riding maybe 100 miles/year. I am moving to the mountains in retirement (where I will be older obviously) and need a bike with enough torque to get my fat butt up a mountain. Speed and range unimportant but I need to be able to climb hills. Is this motor enough?
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
I'm 59, 6'3" 240 pounds and not an avid cycler, riding maybe 100 miles/year.

Dave,

As long as you know how to shift properly, Bosch CX or the Yamaha will provide enough power to get you up the hills.

Both Bosch and Yamaha are 250W nominal (the one that are limited to 20mph) but their peak power when climbing, can reach upto ~500W.

Most importantly, you need to be in the right gear and if you are, Yamaha or Bosch won't have any problem. You will need a 56cm or 60cm frame bike depending on your inseam length.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
I'm 59, 6'3" 240 pounds and not an avid cycler, riding maybe 100 miles/year. I am moving to the mountains in retirement (where I will be older obviously) and need a bike with enough torque to get my fat butt up a mountain. Speed and range unimportant but I need to be able to climb hills. Is this motor enough?

It's a good drive to climb hills, particularly if you're a 'mellow rider' who has a slower cadence. If you try to spin fast like a professional cyclist, it won't give as much power. You can see your cadence on the remote. To get good hillclimbing power, all you will need to do is stay under 90RPM. Even if you spin very slowly, the drive will still provide power. This is one of the main advantages of the Yamaha system. It's really extremely difficult to stall the Yamaha drive on a hill. You have to choose a gear that's wildly off base to get in trouble. I'm 220 and climb some steep hills with the Yamaha. No problem. With a conservative gear choice and a moderate cadence you'll get up the hill without too much effort. You can spin faster than 90RPM and still get power, but I wouldn't recommend it on a hill because it's really where the sweet spot is for this drive.
 
Thanks for both replies although selecting the correct gear and learning about cadence is something I'll need to understand as I go. So if I'm not mistaken the idea is not to gear down to Granny Gear to get up the steepest climb as I would a traditional bike? Do I have that right?

JayVee do you have the same Yamaha that is in the Haibike I described?
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
I have the 500W EU model.
Thanks for both replies although selecting the correct gear and learning about cadence is something I'll need to understand as I go. So if I'm not mistaken the idea is not to gear down to Granny Gear to get up the steepest climb as I would a traditional bike? Do I have that right?

JayVee do you have the same Yamaha that is in the Haibike I described?

I have the 500W EU version. It’s a 28mph version (but that doesn’t change anything for climbing). You can select the granny gear, but it’s not always the best choice. I climb a 19% grade in second or 3rd gear. It will come naturally.
 

lilrich

Member
I agree with the posts above that both those systems are good and have sufficient power for what you need. Not to add too much info to the mix also consider Brose which makes a very good system, very quiet and subtle in power application. As has been said in the past in many places on this forum the best data in choosing the correct bike is by the seat of your pants. Getting a test ride in real use conditions with your abilities will many times make it immediately apparent which bike feels right for you. Picking the right bike is much like finding the right romantic partner, you will know which is right. To expand on that analogy one is not better or worse than the other, just like blond or brunette, just different. Unlike a life partner though a bike is much less painful to trade in on another if you find it just not working out for you and it isn't unusual or frowned upon if you have more than one. Many of our customers have traded in their original bikes as their needs changed, while others have added to their stable keeping their original as backups or for the growing list of friends and family who want to join in. I have many times had customers who's original experience with an Ebike is riding a friends, don't be shy you may be surprised how many of us are willing to let you give her a ride and try it out. Finally keep an eye out for special events at dealers or with manufactures. While almost all will allow test rides I have seen events where rides are under held at off-road locations or extended group tours. Good luck and get out and ride.
 

Dogtoes

New Member
Ok....i got a stumper for you...i came across a ebike from Electric Vehicle Technologies.....ring any bells?? Here are a couple pics
 

Attachments

  • 20180327_180334.jpg
    20180327_180334.jpg
    4.5 MB · Views: 213
  • 20180327_180354.jpg
    20180327_180354.jpg
    1.2 MB · Views: 187

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
@Dogtoes, EVT primarily produced electric mopeds rated at 1500 watts, peak 3K watts and this electric bike was an idea directed at their European market. EVT product were manufactured in Taiwan, imported to the US by 2 different companies. This electric bike had a 750 watt hub motor, if I remember correctly and appeared in US marketing material; however, the bike was only a limited production item (note, the #11 on the serial info. and the 2003 make date in the code). It was a very polished product for the time with a much larger motor than was available on other ebikes then. Don't remember if the battery pack was SLA or NiMH; however, it incorporated features found on the popular EV Global Motor EBike products - built in headlight & taillight and I suspect that the motor is a Heinzmann geared hub motor. Perhaps in Europe it did better; however, the company focused on low speed mopeds with 28-30 mph top speed and later with the updated brushless hub motor, top speed of 35. This limited speed and price near $3000 for new product couldn't compete well in the US once our 2007 high gas prices passed.

EVT was not responsive to requests by US dealers or the importers to create a 45mph product which would've work for most city commuting. Also, many states, including Texas changed registration laws requiring a full motorcycle license and a motorcycle class (another $200) rather than just a regular drivers license in order to be legal. This added more expenses to owning the product at a time when 150cc gas scooters could be bought for a lot less $$.