Is a Slime Seal (Tube) Permanent?

YoGe

Member
Hi - not specifically an eBike question, but I just got my first slime seal on my slime tubed tires and I have a couple of questions. (Mounted on a Specialized Turbo Creo, in case you are interested.) I felt it when I rode over a piece of shrapnel and heard it clatter away from underneath. What are the chances that did not have a sharp edge? So I was not surprised when a half mile later I felt my back tire squishing around under me.

My first slime flat. What I first noticed is that, unlike with a typical tube, the tire did not go completely flat. It seemed to be holding about 5 - 10 psi. Hmm, I thought, let me give this a shot. So I juiced it up to about 60psi with a CO2 cartridge. About 2 minutes later it was not at 60psi but it seemed to be holding at around 50. I rode it a couple of miles to a safe location and then hand pumped it up to around 55. Good enough to complete the route. When I got home I used my full-sized pump to inflate to 60psi which is my preferred pressure. It's been a couple days now and it's holding. So - two questions:

1. Is that sort of "staged sealing" action typical of a slime seal?

2. Now that this is fully sealed, is this slime seal considered as robust as a standard patch seal? Should I continue to ride on this tube or is the slime seal intended to get me home safe - which it did - and now that I'm home should I be replacing the tube?

Thanks for your advice!
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
60 psi is pushing it on tire seal .I run at 70 and often have failures. once its dry though it should be fine. 50 is about the limit for it to work. but once its dry it should be fine.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Glad to hear you made it home!

I'd get that tube replaced or repaired, whatever, it needs attention.

Slime not intended as a permanent repair.
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
1. yes - same as with proper tubeless tires, which i'd strongly recommend on your creo over slimed tubes. the only flat-prone period i've had in the last few years on road bikes was when i was running tubes. never again.
2. no, although it depends on the nature of the puncture. at road pressures, i wouldn't risk a ruined ride to save buying a $5-20 tube!
 

Tars Tarkas

Well-Known Member
It's iffy. A lot of times people don't even know they had a flat and ride essentially forever on a tire that Slime "fixed". As severe as this seemed to be, if it were me, I'd pull the tube and either patch it or replace it. I always carry a spare tube just in case. That's probably the least you ought to do if you're tempted to let it go and see how it does. You might never have another problem.

TT
 

YoGe

Member
Thanks guys, for your responses! It seems that either the seal is going to hold permanently, or it may go flat on me! :) More or less the same risk I take every time I hit the road!

I do carry spare tubes with me. So I'll take the opportunity to do an experiment. I'll post back after about a month to let you know how it's going.

Thanks again, for your advice!
 

Dorkyman

Active Member
Region
USA
I use "Flat-Out," which is supposed to be a "Slime 2.0," an improved product. Even so, I would never trust a hole temporarily plugged with goo. But a patch is forever.
 

Tars Tarkas

Well-Known Member
I use "Flat-Out," which is supposed to be a "Slime 2.0," an improved product. Even so, I would never trust a hole temporarily plugged with goo. But a patch is forever.
Do you inspect your tubes regularly? You could have a dozen punctures that have been plugged with goo.

TT
 

Sparky731

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Even though Slime “patched” your puncture, unless you locate and remove the cause of the puncture it could come back to haunt you again.
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
What @Tars Tarkas said about Slime's permanence. Back when I was using Slime, I was commuting long distances daily and if Slime sealed a puncture I would often see some further weeping of sealant thru the tire down the road, but it held. What I did was, when I had a sealed puncture, let it keep me rolling and then patch the tire in my garage at my leisure on the weekend. I would often find other holes in the tube similarly plugged that also needed patches.
I use "Flat-Out," which is supposed to be a "Slime 2.0," an improved product. Even so, I would never trust a hole temporarily plugged with goo. But a patch is forever.
Interestingly, I have found that unlike Slime, Flatout dries into a hard nub over a hole it has plugged. I consider these holes permanent patches (based on the scientific method of looking at them and thinking 'yeah that looks pretty good') and I no longer do what I did with Slime as described above. If the tire seals - and Flatout has never let me down both on tubed and tubeless tires - its a done deal.
 

Rockroy

Member
Region
USA
Even though Slime “patched” your puncture, unless you locate and remove the cause of the puncture it could come back to haunt you again.
In the past, I've noticed that slime won't usually seal anything until after you pull the object object out. Slime has to come out of the hole to create the plug.

I've used flatout on my off road bike. It's a mixture of chunky black 'beads' and liquid that plug the hole.

I used slime on my family's tubed bikes. Slime seems to work better with tiny goats head punctures with it's tiny black beads.

There is a new slime that is a 2-in-1 that is for tubeless and tubed. I've got a bottle, but have not used it yet.
 

YoGe

Member
Even though Slime “patched” your puncture, unless you locate and remove the cause of the puncture it could come back to haunt you again.
I don't think anything was left embedded in the tire. Immediately following the incident I could see some blue liquid poolling on the tread of the tire. But after I rode several miles I can't even see that anymore. Does it dry black or does it pick up dirt and turn black? I've examined the tire very carefully. I can't see any defect! And it's holding solid at 60psi.
 

Jason Knight

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Keene, NH
Do you inspect your tubes regularly? You could have a dozen punctures that have been plugged with goo.

TT
This happened on my old 3 speed beach cruiser. Dozens of punctures I wasn't even aware of on the front tire to the point the slime was gluing the tube to both rim and tire. I ended up having to replace both tire and tube. I didn't even find that out until it did finally go flat, I went to add air and the Schraeder wouldn't open. Tried to twist it out and it just rotated in place. Finally got it out and it was just caked with dried slime. No shame to it though, that was after around six years of riding.

And that was on 26x1.25 at 35psi.

Oddly not a lick of damage to the rear.

Makes me wonder about my Aventure where it's been 14 months and not a single issue. (Jinx, JINX!!!) Though back in May I did swap from the stock Kenda Juggernauts to some cheaper (but somehow nicer) WD brand whitewalls. If $85/pop can be called cheap, but that's 4" fattie boom blatty's for you.

I've got flatout in there... had some issues where there was excess moisture in the tube from the factory I blamed on flatout (my bad) that I was able to get sorted when I did the swap to the whitewalls. Reasonably sure that it came from Aventon with about a cup and a half of water in the front tube... kind of like the mold growth in the rear brake lines indicating more water than oil.
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
In the past, I've noticed that slime won't usually seal anything until after you pull the object object out. Slime has to come out of the hole to create the plug.
Thats generally right. You can get lucky, but by and large you're well served by hearing the HissHissHiss and taking that as your cue to jump off the bike, grab the needlenose pliers that you keep very handy for this reason, pull the nail or pick out the glass shard and spin the tire. Then ride to let centrifugal force send the sealant into the hole.

Usually the needlenoses go on my handlebar bag, which has molle loops on it and my pliers can be slipped in there, on the outside, and they stay put but can be grabbed in an instant. I placed the pliers like that when I figured out they worked better on sharp glass than my fingertips. This is also usually the time when I am really thankful I eventually gave up on co2 and hand pumps in favor of a battery operated one. Those things are an absolute godsend.

 

ElevenAD

Well-Known Member
Hi - not specifically an eBike question, but I just got my first slime seal on my slime tubed tires and I have a couple of questions. (Mounted on a Specialized Turbo Creo, in case you are interested.) I felt it when I rode over a piece of shrapnel and heard it clatter away from underneath. What are the chances that did not have a sharp edge? So I was not surprised when a half mile later I felt my back tire squishing around under me.

My first slime flat. What I first noticed is that, unlike with a typical tube, the tire did not go completely flat. It seemed to be holding about 5 - 10 psi. Hmm, I thought, let me give this a shot. So I juiced it up to about 60psi with a CO2 cartridge. About 2 minutes later it was not at 60psi but it seemed to be holding at around 50. I rode it a couple of miles to a safe location and then hand pumped it up to around 55. Good enough to complete the route. When I got home I used my full-sized pump to inflate to 60psi which is my preferred pressure. It's been a couple days now and it's holding. So - two questions:

1. Is that sort of "staged sealing" action typical of a slime seal?

2. Now that this is fully sealed, is this slime seal considered as robust as a standard patch seal? Should I continue to ride on this tube or is the slime seal intended to get me home safe - which it did - and now that I'm home should I be replacing the tube?

Thanks for your advice!
its just to get you home and can fail randomly at any time, i have had slime seals fail while the bike is just sitting in the house so replace your tube or put a proper patch on it.
 

Tars Tarkas

Well-Known Member
its just to get you home and can fail randomly at any time, i have had slime seals fail while the bike is just sitting in the house so replace your tube or put a proper patch on it.
That's not how it works in my experience. I overdose my tubes a good little bit, and another key is to ride enough to get the Slime to roll around and fill the puncture. If you didn't ride enough and you parked your bike with the puncture up, yeah, your scenario could happen, especially if you had a minimal amount of Slime in the tube.

TT
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
There's 2 mindsets regarding required maintenance. There's "break down" maintenance that's done when equipment stops functioning/won't go any further, and there's "preventative" maintenance, that's whole purpose is to prevent break downs.

IMHO, when it comes to a tire/tube with a known failure, running it because it "seems to be holding" is done by someone that believes in break down maintenance. That's not for all of us....
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
My experience with Slime is similar to yours with initial pressure loss. IMO, Slime isn't a permanent flat fix. Depending on the type of puncture though, it can hold for a long time. I don't know about other self sealing products but hardened Slime isn't completely waterproof. It will soften if it gets wet frequently. The puncture can reseal itself though if the tube is refilled with Slime as recommended.

I might ride for a considerable length of time on a Slime repair but I will eventually replace the tube.