Is anyone trying to solve charging on the road?

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
If you use a Grin Satiator to charge they can accept 220V. Conceivably an EV plug adapter could be manufactured with a 120V female plug and use any EV station to charge your battery.

What type of 220V plug is used on the Grin Satiator? This lightweight model might work... ;)


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Hectors Ghost

Active Member
What type of 220V plug is used on the Grin Satiator? This lightweight model might work... ;)
Mine doesn't, it has a 120V North American plug, but it can handle 220V. What I would like to own is the female EV receptacle that mounted on the car jury-rigged up to a female 120V plug... an adapter from the EV station handle, wand, what-ever-the-hell-it-is to a 120V plug. Push the adapter onto the EV station changing handle and plug the Satiator into it. For me, this would be the last piece of the puzzle in charging.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
This could be wired up to a 110V or 220V receptacle as long as the EV charging station uses the J1772 standard. Might be a bit cheaper than the adapter mentioned by FlatSix911:

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Without fast charging capability however, using such an adapter would tie up a charging port for a considerable length of time.
 
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Hectors Ghost

Active Member
This could be wired up to a 110V or 220V receptacle as long as the EV charging station uses the J1772 standard.

Without fast charging capability however, using such an adapter would tie up a charging port for a considerable length of time.
How prevalent is the J1772 in EV stations in America, and why the f*** aren't they all standard? How stupid are we? I charge at 8A it doesn't take that long, park, sleep, clean the bike, eat... I don't care how long it takes really, I can stay busy. In the right spot, I could charge both batteries at the same time using the solar panel and an EV station. I've read that some of the National Parks are installing stations. An EV station lets me ride for 3 or 4 more hours each day if that's what I want. Thank you for the information. I know I can make what I need from this plug. - https://prnt.sc/uq8q42

Ride safe man.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Although the J1772 standard was adopted for use in north america in 2001, some earlier chargers use a different setup. As a precaution, many EV owners carry adapters. For anyone interested, Wikipedia has a good write up on the subject. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAE_J1772#History

Here is something else to consider if attempting to wire up an adapter. It appears that some of these EV charging stations have a control circuit which "talks" to the vehicle telling it when to stop & start the charge cycle as well as trip the connector lock.

The biggest problem I see with using these EV charging stations is one of priority. There will be those who complain that these fixtures are meant for cars, not bikes. Unless your e-bike battery can take a fast charge, you may tie up one of these EV stations for several hours whereas most newer EV's can charge in an hour or less. Until e-bikes are equipped to use these chargers, the smart thing to do would be to simply add a 110V outlet to the design of these EV pedestals.
 

Hectors Ghost

Active Member
Here is something else to consider if attempting to wire up an adapter. It appears that some of these EV charging stations have a control circuit which "talks" to the vehicle telling it when to stop & start the charge cycle as well as trip the connector lock.

The biggest problem I see with using these EV charging stations is one of priority.
Thanks again. When it gets here and I get it wired up I will look into the circuit control switch. I have heard that it's a physical switch that needs to be depressed to open the circuit. I appreciate the help. It took 6 months for me to actually learn something helpful on EBR, something that will actually help me. EV stations may have been designed for cars but I will not hesitate to use one when I need a charge.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Here is some encouraging news regarding solar-powered charging stations for EBikes and scooters.


Swiftmile builds solar-powered charging stations that riders can use for free to charge their electric bicycles and scooters. The charging stations are also built locally in the US. The startup uses a few different business models to make the concept work. Public charging stations are open to all users, free of charge, with the company earning revenue from digital advertising billboards on the station. Cities can have them installed for free and only need to provide the infrastructure access; Swiftmile handles the rest.US cities currently operating Swiftmile’s charging stations include Austin, Phoenix, San Francisco, Tampa, and Washington D.C.

 

ki11a

Active Member
Here is some encouraging news regarding solar-powered charging stations for EBikes and scooters.


Swiftmile builds solar-powered charging stations that riders can use for free to charge their electric bicycles and scooters. The charging stations are also built locally in the US. The startup uses a few different business models to make the concept work. Public charging stations are open to all users, free of charge, with the company earning revenue from digital advertising billboards on the station. Cities can have them installed for free and only need to provide the infrastructure access; Swiftmile handles the rest.US cities currently operating Swiftmile’s charging stations include Austin, Phoenix, San Francisco, Tampa, and Washington D.C.


That is awesome...
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Thanks again. When it gets here and I get it wired up I will look into the circuit control switch. I have heard that it's a physical switch that needs to be depressed to open the circuit. I appreciate the help. It took 6 months for me to actually learn something helpful on EBR, something that will actually help me. EV stations may have been designed for cars but I will not hesitate to use one when I need a charge.
Anything helpfull or any news with this project? We don't see many EV stations yet in rural Pennsylvania , but I'm expecting a lot in the next year or two, and hoping for a standard interface (any power source to any battery) RSN.
 

Hectors Ghost

Active Member
Now let's see if they provide 120V outlets or some ridiculous proprietary adapter. It will also be interesting to see how long they are "free". I had a GREAT dealer in high school he would often let me try new goodies "for free"... you know, little taste.

Here is my newest way to access additional existing EV power sources... when it's done and tested. 220V to 120V female for a Grn Satiator.
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ki11a

Active Member
Anything helpfull or any news with this project? We don't see many EV stations yet in rural Pennsylvania , but I'm expecting a lot in the next year or two, and hoping for a standard interface (any power source to any battery) RSN.

There are a few redditors who have EV station chargers that are basically the J1772 adapter and some wiring...but it also requires a charging satiator if I recall correctly.

https://www.reddit.com/r/ebikes/comments/jbio3v

in the end its pretty awesome that they can do that, but it all comes with a very expensive price...too bad we cant really just use our stock chargers in the stations :/
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Now let's see if they provide 120V outlets or some ridiculous proprietary adapter. It will also be interesting to see how long they are "free". I had a GREAT dealer in high school he would often let me try new goodies "for free"... you know, little taste.

Here is my newest way to access additional existing EV power sources... when it's done and tested. 220V to 120V female for a Grn Satiator.View attachment 69020View attachment 69021View attachment 69022
Coolness. You are already using a Grin charger, right?
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Now let's see if they provide 120V outlets or some ridiculous proprietary adapter. It will also be interesting to see how long they are "free". I had a GREAT dealer in high school he would often let me try new goodies "for free"... you know, little taste.

Here is my newest way to access additional existing EV power sources... when it's done and tested. 220V to 120V female for a Grn Satiator.View attachment 69020View attachment 69021View attachment 69022
Very nice work... can you post a photo of the 120V plug?
I think there is a large market for this type of adapter. ;)
 

webcurl

Active Member
There's a lot more info here (particularly in the OpenEVSE links):
 

Hectors Ghost

Active Member
Coolness. You are already using a Grin charger, right?
Yes. I got a Satiator when I bought my 1st batteries. They can take 220V so if I can make a jumper from the EV station to the 120V female I can charge at 8A just like normal. That's if I can get power from the station through the jumper. This isn't something that I would try without expert advice and input. If I can do it all it gives me is access to the EV stations at my normal charge rate. The biggest advantage will be that EV stations are well mapped out, and should be able to be relied upon. But I don't see them riding in areas they seem to be. Better for following road networks I'm assuming. For me to be "comfortable" I need access to power over-night. Not trying to get 30 mins. or an hour of charge time here and there. I can easily charge everything I have in 8 hours if I have two 120V outlets,. Lot of switch-a-roo but easy to keep up with daily power consumption even if I am using 2500Wh for the bike, and then for cameras, GPS, music, phone, lights, etc. I can charge 10 USB devices at once and that helps save time dicking around too. I always try and finish all charging before I crash out for the night... even if I am up every 2 hours anyway.