Is anyone trying to solve charging on the road?

Mass Deduction

Active Member
Thanks for the link, I read several articles there. I see that you specifically quoted me saying I typically wait 30+ minutes after a ride before I put the bike on charge. I haven't found any content on Battery University yet that specifically addresses that, yet. Should I be looking for something specific?
 

BBassett

Active Member
Thanks for the link, I read several articles there. I see that you specifically quoted me saying I typically wait 30+ minutes after a ride before I put the bike on charge. I haven't found any content on Battery University yet that specifically addresses that, yet. Should I be looking for something specific?
Nope... I think it's the pack's temperature that is the most important factor. I learned a lot from that site.
 

Mass Deduction

Active Member
Nope... I think it's the pack's temperature that is the most important factor. I learned a lot from that site.
Gotcha. I did read that after 90 minutes of the battery chemistry settling down that the computer gets a more accurate reading of the charge level, but I can't assert the accessory of that information. :)
 

BBassett

Active Member
Gotcha. I did read that after 90 minutes of the battery chemistry settling down that the computer gets a more accurate reading of the charge level, but I can't assert the accessory of that information. :)
I researched Lithium batteries, found what I thought was the best manufacturer and size battery for the style riding I do. I bought and used my 1st 28Ah pack only charging with a Grin Satiator for about 3K miles riding... and then bought a 30+Ah. Whenever I have a question about them or how to properly use/maintain them I just send an email and their experts and within a couple of days I get my answers. I have never heard anything about Lithium batteries needing time after use before charging but it's not going to hurt, especially if they are chilly.
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
I have never heard anything about Lithium batteries needing time after use before charging
It does make sense, at least from my view. It usually takes a few minutes for my packs to stabilize to settle at a given voltage after stopping. Often a volt or two higher. So if they are somehow recovering from use it makes sense to wait and charge a stabilized pack. It just seems common sense.
 

BBassett

Active Member
It does make sense, at least from my view. It usually takes a few minutes for my packs to stabilize to settle at a given voltage after stopping. Often a volt or two higher. So if they are somehow recovering from use it makes sense to wait and charge a stabilized pack. It just seems common sense.
So does buying a 52V pack large enough that you never discharge past 45.4V and can still ride for 80 miles.
 

Handlebars

Active Member
So does buying a 52V pack large enough that you never discharge past 45.4V and can still ride for 80 miles.
I'm definitely on board with buying at least one big battery, what with the wind and hills and cold.
The only supplementary system for camping trips that I could possibly foresee for now is having a small gas generator in tow.
 

BBassett

Active Member
I'm definitely on board with buying at least one big battery, what with the wind and hills and cold.
The only supplementary system for camping trips that I could possibly foresee for now is having a small gas generator in tow.
That would be great for car camping and doing long day rides then coming back and charging at night with the generator. But even a small lightweight generator is too heavy to lug around. I use a 17 lb. 300W folding solar panel to charge the packs spring, summer, and fall. The only disadvantage of a 30Ah pack is the weight and the initial cost... all the advantages make it worth both.
 

Handlebars

Active Member
That would be great for car camping and doing long day rides then coming back and charging at night with the generator. But even a small lightweight generator is too heavy to lug around. I use a 17 lb. 300W folding solar panel to charge the packs spring, summer, and fall. The only disadvantage of a 30Ah pack is the weight and the initial cost... all the advantages make it worth both.
I'm seeing the small generators weighing in at 50 lbs. Not good, but at least maybe possible to put in tow?
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
I'm seeing the small generators weighing in at 50 lbs. Not good, but at least maybe possible to put in tow?
I've been eyeing a small towable gas generator for some time now for extended off grid bike touring. This one caught my eye:


It weighs just 21 pounds and puts out 800 watts which is enough to power a couple of battery chargers with some left over for camp use.

In theory, you could charge a spare battery on the trailer while riding and never run out of juice.
 

GypsyTreker

Active Member


  1. I've been eyeing a small towable gas generator for some time now for extended off grid bike touring. This one caught my eye:


    It weighs just 21 pounds and puts out 800 watts which is enough to power a couple of battery chargers with some left over for camp use.

    In theory, you could charge a spare battery on the trailer while riding and never run out of juice.
    I have seen those also, they are available under different brand names. Some mixed reviews on Amazon. Of course if your buying gas to "fuel" your eBike it's kinda missing the point on ePower. That said, if your looking to achieve range can't see it not working. 20# is pretty light.
 

Handlebars

Active Member
I've been eyeing a small towable gas generator for some time now for extended off grid bike touring. This one caught my eye:


It weighs just 21 pounds and puts out 800 watts which is enough to power a couple of battery chargers with some left over for camp use.

In theory, you could charge a spare battery on the trailer while riding and never run out of juice.
6zfshdb, Thank you for the information! 15.6" x 8.2" x 14.0". That really puts the dream of forever riding within reach. It could even be put as one side of a set of panniers.
 

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
The 500Wh packs are often in the 13-15 Ah range each, though, so two might be a closer comparison. What's the Wh rating of this infamous 30 Ah pack of which you speak?

Since I sometimes can pre-seed a route with batteries (leaving them with friends, relatives, and with businesses I have a connection with), that's an advantage to the 500 Wh/14 Ah packs that are available for my current e-bike. That way I'm effectively getting increased battery capacity without having to carry as much weight.

I suppose if I had to choose between carrying a super-heavy pack everywhere (even for short rides), or having the flexibility to use a lightweight pack for small rides, I'd go with the lightweight option (even knowing that it would mean carrying multiple packs for super long rides).

I started with a 55 pound e-bike. Then I upgraded to a 49 pound bike. Now I've upgraded to a 42.5 pound e-bike. My next bike will probably be 33 pounds. I don't think I'd be willing to accept the weight penalty that comes with converting a bike (which also voids its warranty) and putting on a massive battery. All too often that puts you in the 60+ pound range, and I don't think I'd enjoy pedalling a bike like that.

It's also not what I need most of the time, since super long trips that need a super-huge battery are a relative rarity for me. My day-to-day riding is mostly relatively short trips, and a lightweight bike is more enjoyable for that.
If you don't mind sharing I'm curious as to what each of the bikes were/are and what you have your eye on i.e.
55 lb. bike?
49 lb. bike?
42.5 lb bike?
I'm guessing the 33 lb. bike is the BMC Alpenchallenge Road One?
 

BBassett

Active Member
I've been eyeing a small towable gas generator for some time now for extended off grid bike touring. This one caught my eye:


It weighs just 21 pounds and puts out 800 watts which is enough to power a couple of battery chargers with some left over for camp use.

In theory, you could charge a spare battery on the trailer while riding and never run out of juice.
Gas is 6 lbs per gallon... how many of those are you going to carry between your refills? A generator isn't feasible.
 

Mass Deduction

Active Member
If you don't mind sharing I'm curious as to what each of the bikes were/are and what you have your eye on i.e.
55 lb. bike?
49 lb. bike?
42.5 lb bike?
I'm guessing the 33 lb. bike is the BMC Alpenchallenge Road One?
55 lb bike = iZip E3 Moda

49 lb bike = Raleigh Tamland iE (46 pounds originally, but 49 pounds after I swapped to Schwalbe Energizer Pro tires)

42.5 lb bike = Felt Sport-E

33 lb bike = BMC Alpenchallenge AMP Cross LTD (I was interested in the Road One, but switched to the Cross LTD after I started getting tendonitis in my arms on drop-bar bikes)

I also have a Haibike XDURO Race S 6.0, but that's a different kind of bike for a different kind of riding. Whereas I replaced the iZip with the Raleigh, and replaced the Raleigh with the Felt, and may replace the Felt with the BMC.
 

GypsyTreker

Active Member
I don't know. How much fuel would it take to charge 2 x 20Ah batteries?
Actually if these 800w gens are like my Honda 1000eu I get about 7 hours per 1/2 gallon. How much fuel would you actually need to carry? 6lb's worth? By the way, I get 7hours charging my goal zero yeti ( while connected to my Dometic 65 ) and while plugged into my Aframe camper .... running led lights, Echo, phone chargers and ......drum roll, LG 5000 btu a/c on low.
 

GypsyTreker

Active Member
Anti eBike folk would love these past few posts.....fossil fuel to fuel your zero emission eBike. LOL

I will say this, the Honda 1000 would be out of the question , it weighs way too much but 19.8 +6....not so bad .
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
21lbs is slightly more than my carry weight, with bike bags, tools, clothes, and camping gear.

So that little generator would basically double what I haul. I don't think so...