Is Cruise Control feature considered Class 1 E-bike? (eg. not throttle?)

gembike223

New Member
I know many e-bikes have the cruise control function whereby you pedal up to a certain speed and you can then "lock" the power and have the purely run on motor. I did notice that many of these don't really advertise this feature. I wonder if it is due to regulations? How does the class regulations define cruise control? Is it throttle, is it not?
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Class 1 and 3 are pedal assist only. When a rider stops pedaling, the motor stops assisting. A cruise control assist would be class 2.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
A good question.

If the bike doesn't have a physical throttle (twist, thumb, lever, button, etc), technically, it could be considered a class 1 or a class 3 if it is capable of 28 mph speeds. By rights though, it should be a class 2 bike since it can be ridden without pedaling.

Bikes are supposed to have a class sticker in many states. It would be interesting to see how the bike maker classifies it.

Without a class sticker and physical throttle, it would be difficult for law enforcement to determine whether the bike is legal or not unless you're observed tooling around without pedaling. However, in some states, LEO's use a list of bike make & models to determine it's legal status.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
A good question.

If the bike doesn't have a physical throttle (twist, thumb, lever, button, etc), technically, it could be considered a class 1 or a class 3 if it is capable of 28 mph speeds. By rights though, it should be a class 2 bike since it can be ridden without pedaling.

Bikes are supposed to have a class sticker in many states. It would be interesting to see how the bike maker classifies it.

Without a class sticker and physical throttle, it would be difficult for law enforcement to determine whether the bike is legal or not unless you're observed tooling around without pedaling. However, in some states, LEO's use a list of bike make & models to determine it's legal status.
I'm not in full agreement with the law, but there's little ambiguity. "Only when the rider is pedaling", is clear that a cruise control is class 2.

Class 1 electric bicycleA bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour.
Class 2 electric bicycleA bicycle equipped with a motor that may be used exclusively to propel the bicycle, and that is not capable of providing assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour.
Class 3 electric bicycleA bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 28 miles per hour and is equipped with a speedometer.

 

PedalUma

Active Member
Region
USA
I sold a bike to a professional bass player. I told him that it is acoustic/electric. It takes what you are doing and can amplify it just like a guitar. You are still riding a bike, but can keep up with the drum kit. He took it on a test ride and when he came back he said, "Where's the Cruise Control"?
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
If you more loosely define cruise control as being active while the rider is pedaling, then cruise control would be legal on Class 1 and 3.

The concept of cruise control doesn't map well into a bike, because on a car your only way to move is via the accelerator, and on a bike it's pedal, throttle or both.

One feature I wanted on my juiced CCS was having the throttle give additional power when depressed, including above 20 mph. I would travel on level 1 or 2 assist mostly, but I wanted bursts of higher power here and there, and it's cumbersome to dial the assist up and down vs using the throttle for a short burst of power.

Evidently the Vanmoof S3 has a lever like this (technically not a throttle).