Is it Safe to Wrap the Battery Area (Xduro Fullseven RX) with Cling Wrap?

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
@EdVille started a conversation with several of our members about protecting his ebike battery during gnarly wintry wet weather and the feedback was very informative. We're sharing this with everyone and looking to learn how you protect your battery from damage in extreme conditions. Ed's got more of the winter issues and I've got more of the overheat, summer issues.

To start: from @EdVille: I've only used the bike in cold weather so far and I noticed that the battery never got hot or even warm. But in the summertime, is this going to be a problem? I want to shield the battery and connections from mud and water. I'm thinking Cling Wrap or Saran Wrap might work if wound tight enough, but is it ok to do that?

@Chris Nolte reply:
The Bosch battery runs very cool. They have many protections in their BMS to keep it that way. I'm not sure that the cling wrap is necessary unless you're planning on ridding in some really extreme conditions. I don't think it should hurt much although if you didn't seal it effectively you could keep water in rather than letting it out. That would be my only concern. I wouldn't be too concerned about the tempature as I can't the wrap changing things too much.

I think Eddie from the U.K. might have some posts on this as I know he's gotten his bike pretty wet and muddy.

@JayVee reply: Yup, I second that. If anybody knows how these bikes work in thick mud and rain it's@EddieJ.
I don't think the mud and water will be that much of an issue based on some of the adventures he's posted.

@Ann M. reply:
From what I see in EddieJ's videos & pics, there's no wrapping. Where do you live, Ed? If it's pretty warm and humid like it is in Central Texas with lots of direct sunlight, do not wrap that battery in the summer! Overheating can shorten the lifespan of most lithium batteries; yours is no exception. The humidity traps more heat, like a garage in summer and that can reduce the cooling ability of the battery. Yes, saran wrap is thin but it still would work like an insulator holding in the heat and not allowing the flow of moving air to pull away some of the heat as you ride. The more hills you do at higher assist the more draw on that battery, so it will be warmer in the spring and summer. Do not see any reason to wrap the battery; you're not supposed to ride these bikes through a river so a little water is not an issue. Do make a habit of wiping your bike down and letting it dry out if you've been caught in a hard shower. This will keep all of the bike components in better shape, too.

@Ravi Kempaiah reply:
For winter time, I highly recommend the Fahrer Bosch Battery sleeve.
I have been using it for 2 months and in the last 1 month, Chicago has had -20'C weather and this sleeve has served me very well.
There are 2 big advantages to the battery sleeves.
  1. Protection from elements. All the slush/salty ice on the street doesn't reach the battery. This brine solution has the ability to corrode materials.
  2. Prevent range loss and battery chemistry degradation at extreme temperatures.
The Neoprene cover has some level breathability as well.

But for the summer time, I wouldn't use this. You need some sort of air cooling to vent the excess heat. Bosch batteries are very well built and as long as you're not riding in knee deep waters, I wouldn't worry about it.

But for the summer time, I wouldn't use this. You need some sort of air cooling to vent the excess heat. Bosch batteries are very well built and as long as you're not riding in knee deep waters, I wouldn't worry about it.

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)


@Ann M. reply: I'm with Ravi on the neoprene sleeve! Keeping the battery warm during cold winter days and protected from damaging slush will be a boon to your range. Ravi's in the Northeast where they get a real winter; we get the effects of extreme summer here.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
I ordered the Fahrer sleeve for my Bosch powerpack 500 the other day. From e-bike shop UK. Shipping was almost as much as the cover but I didn't have success finding in the US.
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
Although I have been using my bike in some pretty cold weather it hasn't really been a problem getting as much time in as a charged battery will allow and never leave them in the cold. However I can see me getting a cheap wetsuit and making some covers for my batteries for future use as it does make sense. Neoprene is really easy to work with and they would only be three panels and 2 seams. Hmmm.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
I ordered the Fahrer sleeve for my Bosch powerpack 500 the other day. From e-bike shop UK. Shipping was almost as much as the cover but I didn't have success finding in the US.

We have plenty of battery sleeves for Bosch, Yamaha and Easy motion batteries. Let me know if you need any.

Although I have been using my bike in some pretty cold weather it hasn't really been a problem getting as much time in as a charged battery will allow and never leave them in the cold. However I can see me getting a cheap wetsuit and making some covers for my batteries for future use as it does make sense. Neoprene is really easy to work with and they would only be three panels and 2 seams. Hmmm.
@JRA ,

99% of the E-bike batteries don't have the level of sophistication you find in Chevy Volt BMS or Tesla BMS.
I have learnt it the hard way. I used to own a Easy Motion bike and used it all winter and the range was drastically reduced within the next 10 months.

I have been using the Bosch sleeve and the range I am getting on a puny 400Whr battery is ~ 30 miles in -10 to -20'C weather.
My point is, sub zero temps and high voltages (fully charged batteries) don't go well.
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
@EdVille started a conversation with several of our members about protecting his ebike battery during gnarly wintry wet weather and the feedback was very informative. We're sharing this with everyone and looking to learn how you protect your battery from damage in extreme conditions. Ed's got more of the winter issues and I've got more of the overheat, summer issues.

To start: from @EdVille: I've only used the bike in cold weather so far and I noticed that the battery never got hot or even warm. But in the summertime, is this going to be a problem? I want to shield the battery and connections from mud and water. I'm thinking Cling Wrap or Saran Wrap might work if wound tight enough, but is it ok to do that?

@Chris Nolte reply:
The Bosch battery runs very cool. They have many protections in their BMS to keep it that way. I'm not sure that the cling wrap is necessary unless you're planning on ridding in some really extreme conditions. I don't think it should hurt much although if you didn't seal it effectively you could keep water in rather than letting it out. That would be my only concern. I wouldn't be too concerned about the tempature as I can't the wrap changing things too much.

I think Eddie from the U.K. might have some posts on this as I know he's gotten his bike pretty wet and muddy.

@JayVee reply: Yup, I second that. If anybody knows how these bikes work in thick mud and rain it's@EddieJ.
I don't think the mud and water will be that much of an issue based on some of the adventures he's posted.

@Ann M. reply:


From what I see in EddieJ's videos & pics, there's no wrapping. Where do you live, Ed? If it's pretty warm and humid like it is in Central Texas with lots of direct sunlight, do not wrap that battery in the summer! Overheating can shorten the lifespan of most lithium batteries; yours is no exception. The humidity traps more heat, like a garage in summer and that can reduce the cooling ability of the battery. Yes, saran wrap is thin but it still would work like an insulator holding in the heat and not allowing the flow of moving air to pull away some of the heat as you ride. The more hills you do at higher assist the more draw on that battery, so it will be warmer in the spring and summer. Do not see any reason to wrap the battery; you're not supposed to ride these bikes through a river so a little water is not an issue. Do make a habit of wiping your bike down and letting it dry out if you've been caught in a hard shower. This will keep all of the bike components in better shape, too.

@Ravi Kempaiah reply:
For winter time, I highly recommend the Fahrer Bosch Battery sleeve.
I have been using it for 2 months and in the last 1 month, Chicago has had -20'C weather and this sleeve has served me very well.
There are 2 big advantages to the battery sleeves.
  1. Protection from elements. All the slush/salty ice on the street doesn't reach the battery. This brine solution has the ability to corrode materials.
  2. Prevent range loss and battery chemistry degradation at extreme temperatures.
The Neoprene cover has some level breathability as well.

But for the summer time, I wouldn't use this. You need some sort of air cooling to vent the excess heat. Bosch batteries are very well built and as long as you're not riding in knee deep waters, I wouldn't worry about it.

But for the summer time, I wouldn't use this. You need some sort of air cooling to vent the excess heat. Bosch batteries are very well built and as long as you're not riding in knee deep waters, I wouldn't worry about it.

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)


@Ann M. reply: I'm with Ravi on the neoprene sleeve! Keeping the battery warm during cold winter days and protected from damaging slush will be a boon to your range. Ravi's in the Northeast where they get a real winter; we get the effects of extreme summer here.

Hello Ann-Does anyone know (perhaps Court or Ravi) if the batteries/motors pose any threat to radiation exposure or RF being the size and amps are quite large? Just curious if there has been any research done concerning hazards with exposure to long use. Just a thought.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Hello Ann-Does anyone know (perhaps Court or Ravi) if the batteries/motors pose any threat to radiation exposure or RF being the size and amps are quite large? Just curious if there has been any research done concerning hazards with exposure to long use. Just a thought.

Hi Bob,
As a materials scientist, I can share my thoughts. I don't have extensive experience studying radiation induced effects in Li-ion systems but Li-ion (especially Li-NMC) used in E-bikes are very safe.
The problem arises when you use Li-Po systems that are not maintained by a good BMS.
Here is a scientific study that was conducted and the authors suggest that Li-ion systems are quite tolerant of radiation effects.

http://jes.ecsdl.org/content/151/4/A652.abstract

Having said that, I would not keep my bike next to X-ray or MRI machine. What made you think about this?
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
Hi Bob,
As a materials scientist, I can share my thoughts. I don't have extensive experience studying radiation induced effects in Li-ion systems but Li-ion (especially Li-NMC) used in E-bikes are very safe.
The problem arises when you use Li-Po systems that are not maintained by a good BMS.
Here is a scientific study that was conducted and the authors suggest that Li-ion systems are quite tolerant of radiation effects.

http://jes.ecsdl.org/content/151/4/A652.abstract

Having said that, I would not keep my bike next to X-ray or MRI machine. What made you think about this?

Thanks Ravi for your response! I am seeing so much controversy concerning electronics all around us these days due to exposure to these devices
(ie: RF, microwaves and radiation exposure from smartphones used next to your head, smart meters for gas, electric and water meters) Scientists have been measuring the effects and it looks like the biggest threat is the microwaves emitted from cell towers. Radiologists are claiming that they are seeing more and more incidents through exposure. Even dental x-rays are causing ill effects on the body through constant exposure.

Some dentists are making patients believe if they do not commit to 18-20 xrays in one visit, they will not continue with a dental cleaning! Astounding is't it! (The norm s/b 4-6 bitewings every 24 to 36 months if you are in good dental health) See comments in article below:

http://healthydebate.ca/personal-health-navigator/dental-x-rays

If you google smart meter exposure, there all kinds of articles of people having issues through exposure and petitions being drawn. The ICC just instituted an opt out program for Comm Edison smart meters due to the public outcry and controversy surrounding this issue. I am not saying the systems used in ebikes is hazardous, I am just a little curious how all this measures up in comparison IMHO. Some interesting points to ponder. Thanks again Ravi!
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Thanks Ravi for your response! I am seeing so much controversy concerning electronics all around us these days due to exposure to these devices
(ie: RF, microwaves and radiation exposure from smartphones used next to your head, smart meters for gas, electric and water meters) Scientists have been measuring the effects and it looks like the biggest threat is the microwaves emitted from cell towers. Radiologists are claiming that they are seeing more and more incidents through exposure. Even dental x-rays are causing ill effects on the body through constant exposure.

Some dentists are making patients believe if they do not commit to 18-20 xrays in one visit, they will not continue with a dental cleaning! Astounding is't it! (The norm s/b 4-6 bitewings every 24 to 36 months if you are in good dental health) See comments in article below:

http://healthydebate.ca/personal-health-navigator/dental-x-rays

If you google smart meter exposure, there all kinds of articles of people having issues through exposure and petitions being drawn. The ICC just instituted an opt out program for Comm Edison smart meters due to the public outcry and controversy surrounding this issue. I am not saying the systems used in ebikes is hazardous, I am just a little curious how all this measures up in comparison IMHO. Some interesting points to ponder. Thanks again Ravi!

It's funny you mention this.
One of my friend is a naturopathic doctor and she convinced me to try an experiment. Not to use the microwave for 2 months and see if I see any positive effects in terms of food/digestion etc. So, I am doing that right now.
Internet is a place where you will find all kinds of information and one has to exercise certain level of discretion. I mean if we go in that direction, cellphones/radiation from tablets etc are the ones that need detailed evaluation.
E-bike batteries come way down the list.
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
It's funny you mention this.
One of my friend is a naturopathic doctor and she convinced me to try an experiment. Not to use the microwave for 2 months and see if I see any positive effects in terms of food/digestion etc. So, I am doing that right now.
Internet is a place where you will find all kinds of information and one has to exercise certain level of discretion. I mean if we go in that direction, cellphones/radiation from tablets etc are the ones that need detailed evaluation.
E-bike batteries come way down the list.

Yes, I thought so for the ebikes. Microwaves have been around my household since the 70s and I have not had one or used one for quite a few years. Further research has revealed that they also are not a healthful option over the long term, as well as non-stick cookware. I seems the the new ceramic coatings may be a bit safer, but I am sure they will also be challenged. I think you are conducting a great test for yourself. Perhaps opting for more organics for your entire digestive system also may thank you later for that. Good Luck with the micro test! I hope you get very positive results.
I would be interested to know what the effects and your findings are as a result. Thanks!