Is my locking plan good enough?

dmourati

Member
Region
USA
City
Mountain View
If someone wants to steal my bike while I’m on it I’ll usually also have my 5yo kid with me. I would either get off the bike and walk away, quickly ride away, or fight for my life with all my might. Hopefully won’t ever be put to that test.
 

Pobidz

Member
Region
USA
City
Twin Cities, MN
The only difference is the crime, not the criminal.
I'd need to see data on that. They seem very different to me. One is inherently more confrontational and risky than the other. I don't think the type of person who is creeping around and waiting for an opportune moment to take something without being seen is the same type of person to brazenly hold someone at knifepoint and put themself in a potentially vulnerable situation for an uncertain reward.
 

MartsEbike

Well-Known Member
Region
Other
If someone wants to steal my bike while I’m on it I’ll usually also have my 5yo kid with me. I would either get off the bike and walk away, quickly ride away, or fight for my life with all my might. Hopefully won’t ever be put to that test.
Fair points. The actual situation is hard to envisage but it happens regularly.

Things to keep in mind generally....

Where would your phone be?... In your pocket, or on the bike, being used as a map? Now gone with the thief...
Where would your wallet be? In your pocket, or in a bike bag? Which the thief just took.

Now you could be stranded with nothing... Maybe 10-20 miles from home with nothing... nada... not even loose change to use a phone box.

Its worth just keeping it in mind so that if you are put to the test, you're not left wanting....
 

MartsEbike

Well-Known Member
Region
Other
I'd need to see data on that. They seem very different to me. One is inherently more confrontational and risky than the other. I don't think the type of person who is creeping around and waiting for an opportune moment to take something without being seen is the same type of person to brazenly hold someone at knifepoint and put themself in a potentially vulnerable situation for an uncertain reward.

You don't get to choose the criminal you meet.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
Its good to have a plan to secure the bike when you're away. But what's your plan going to be if you're still with or on the bike when they try steal it?

So few people even consider this a possibility...
Not much planning to do here. If someone wants your bike that badly, let them take it. No bike is worth a physical assault or worse. Let law enforcement deal with it.

Back when I was young and foolish, I used to ride a trail with a section that ran through a pretty seedy area. There were many incidents of joggers and bikers being mugged. I have a concealed carry permit in my state and actually carried a small pistol with me when I rode there. I eventually came to my senses and stopped the practice after seeing some statistics. There is a significant chance that you could be killed or injured with your own gun. There is a greater chance you could get into serious legal trouble if you actually shot someone.

While it's a nice trail, it isn't worth the hassle. I now ride elsewhere.
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
You don't get to choose the criminal you meet.
No but his point is still valid. One crime is inherently furtive and non confrontational. The other is a physical assault either with or without a weapon. Statistically speaking, bike theft is rampant compared to assault and armed robbery and this is true globally.

Not so long ago, along my bike route, a homeless guy took a bike from a rider at knifepoint... in one of the busiest intersections in town, in what could be called a very good neighborhood. Myself, I have been involved in a couple of altercations, but with motorists who have decided they own the road and I need a lesson in submission. Also one full-on (attempted) assault/robbery and several halfhearted ones. I used to commute thru a very bad part of town where - usually - all I had to deal with were the prostitutes trying out their lines on me at intersections. They knew I wasn't a customer cuz we were all regulars but occasionally their pimps didn't appreciate the banter... work time is not social time after all.

You learn to discreetly keep your head on a swivel (sunglasses help) and yes... have a plan and be mentally prepared to execute it.

As noted, this is a whole different subject than bike locks.
 

MartsEbike

Well-Known Member
Region
Other
No but his point is still valid. One crime is inherently furtive and non confrontational. The other is a physical assault either with or without a weapon. Statistically speaking, bike theft is rampant compared to assault and armed robbery and this is true globally.

I'm aware non-confrontational bike theft is the highest risk, but I think many are underplaying the risk of robbery, and all I'm trying to do is remind people its something to remember.
 

dmourati

Member
Region
USA
City
Mountain View
One other thing I think helps against an armed robbery/bike-jacking scenario: situational awareness. By that I mean, paying attention to your surroundings and being generally alert and aware.

This goes for off the bike as well, for example just out for a walk.

I think if you can cultivate this skill, and generally carry yourself in a calm, confident manner, you will make yourself a less desirable target for any type of criminal.

I have put this skill to the test in my younger days on the South side of Chicago and while nervous on the inside, my outward demeanor kept me safe from hassles that could have easily turned into something worse.

It doesn't hurt to be 6' tall and 275lbs!
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Here's the thing about cables: They can be cut thru with a simple pair of electrician's dykes. Since a big cable is a series of smaller ones, bundled, you just snip a little at a time and 20 snips later you are thru. Or just use a bigger set of snippers and its 10 snips. Or 2. Or medium bolt cutters in one.
You've obviously never cut a 19 ga stainless steel wire. Of which the mcmaster 1/2" cable has about 70. Cutting copper wire and cutting stainless steel are entirely different experiences.
Yes a $219 bolt cutter could do it - once. Then resharpen the bolt cutter to eliminate the big dent in the edge.
As far as being strong-armed, the pepper spray hangs from the handlebar, ready for dogs in 5 seconds. Or somebody else. The 1 lb abus 92/80 lock stays locked to the end of the 6' 8 lb cable, and the cable loop sticks out of the pannier at all times. I've used the 3/8" cable with a master lock on a 30" high dog before. The lock end swings at the dog's (perpetrator's) head, with 6' of velocity multiplication.
In the city when shopping I wear a NIJ IIIa rated vest under a buttoned up shirt. Going to the grocery store is now an executable offense. Happened in Louisville in 2020 at Kroger's. Happened in El Paso in 2019 and in Colorado in 2021. I'm native Am looking, could be taken for an oriental by an idiot.
 
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m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
For normal people who buy bicycle lock cables, my point stands. I think as much of your viewpoint as you do of mine, and frankly no one reading this should buy any of our bullshit. Investigate. Verify. After all we're just self important mouths running on the internet.

Exhibit 1: 4 bicycle lock cables cut all at once with a concealable, readily available tool.


And the follow on to the above video showing how to do it easily with simple Walmart-purchased electrical wire cutters.

And he didn't even need to cut cable wires individually. A bigger cable cuts like I said it did, and anyone can see why now that they've seen this.
 

alphacarina

Active Member
Region
USA
I have a concealed carry permit in my state and actually carried a small pistol with me when I rode there. I eventually came to my senses and stopped the practice after seeing some statistics. There is a significant chance that you could be killed or injured with your own gun.
Smart move!

The average person thinks they could shoot someone over some item of personal property, but they'd probably actually have to think about it twice or three times. The criminal on the other hand will react almost instantly when someone points a gun at them. You're trying to save your bike, he's reacting to save his life. When a 'good guy with a gun' meets a 'bad guy with a gun' the outcome is pretty predicable - Look at all the young kids going to prison for firearm crimes these days - They don't think about anything before they pull the trigger. I'd have to do LOTS of thinking before I could shoot anybody and I suspect that's pretty normal

Don
 

Jmedvm

New Member
Region
USA
City
Mesa, Arizona
2-3 AIRTAGS , and Turn off their speaker.
2-3 AIRTAGS , and Turn off their speaker.
You have to open the Air Tag up and remove the speaker. According to Apple you can not turn them off. After 72 hrs on “Find My” they begin to beep. Here is just one of many “how to”s.
This of course voids the warranty and may compromise the water resistance. I am going to buy a silicone closed case for the Air Tag and mount it with double stick industrial mounting tape inside the top or side of the battery compartment while battery is removed on my bike.
Luckily here the local police department will provide an officer to go with you if you are tracing a stolen item. Different police departments handle this differently.
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
As well as deploying several decent locks with big chains looped around separate items where possible, I pull a brake lever to engage the motor cutoff and insert an object such as a piece of folded paper or cable tie end into the opening. That means the motor won't turn on so it prevents someone wrecking the bike that way by pushing buttons while it's parked and unless they brought a truck it would make for a very slow getaway if they managed to pick or cut the locks off.
 
Region
USA
As well as deploying several decent locks with big chains looped around separate items where possible, I pull a brake lever to engage the motor cutoff and insert an object such as a piece of folded paper or cable tie end into the opening. That means the motor won't turn on so it prevents someone wrecking the bike that way by pushing buttons while it's parked and unless they brought a truck it would make for a very slow getaway if they managed to pick or cut the locks off.
I am not comfortable leaving my 2k ebike anywhere except my office which is a closed campus with security guards. For grocery trips and dates with wife, I take my 80 dollar Walmart single speed bike that I could care less if it’s stolen. Fortunately we live in dense city that all non ebike trips are under 5 miles. We also keep our bikes inside at home because lots of locks get cut here in Scottsdale unfortunately.
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
I am not comfortable leaving my 2k ebike anywhere except my office which is a closed campus with security guards. For grocery trips and dates with wife, I take my 80 dollar Walmart single speed bike that I could care less if it’s stolen. Fortunately we live in dense city that all non ebike trips are under 5 miles. We also keep our bikes inside at home because lots of locks get cut here in Scottsdale unfortunately.
I never leave the bike parked outside for long no matter how many locks. The good part is that there are hundreds of times the number of ebikes now than 2 years ago and none of them are well locked, never seen one well locked, so I feel a bit safer now than I used to. If I leave it for half an hour, that is a long time for me. There are more expensive bikes locked up with a $20 cable lock pretty much everywhere now.
 

Rickman1

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Aridzona
I very seldom leave my ebike anywhere unattended. I've planned for those times when I may go to a store or decide to stop for a drink or bite to eat. I park my bike close to the entrance of the store where there is a lot of foot traffic (people able to see the bike). I'm usually in the store for no longer than 15 minutes. When I stop to get a drink or eat I try to find a place that has outdoor seating and/or windows so I can see my bike. I'm currently using an Abus Gordo 6000 folding lock which includes an alarm and I have attached a motion alarm to the bike. I carry a 43 inch Abus chain lock for locking the front wheel to the frame if needed. I purchased a Tex Lock 2.0 which I may start using as it is covered with a textile material which should prevent any scratching of the paint and it is rated as gold class. I'm on the waiting list for the new Hip Lock D1000 due to be available early next year. I think I have all my bases covered. When not riding the ebikes they stay inside the house.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
Anyone have an ESuv that requires a 1.25 inch hitch? My new car is a Hyundai Kona EV and I am looking for a 1.25 hitch and rack that will carry my Espin Sport. Boy just when I had my Stealth hitch and 1up dialed in!!