Jones H bar - Flat vs Riser

murbot

Member
Region
USA
City
MOUNT AIRY, MD USA
Hi,
Anybody have experience with both a flat Jones H bar and one with a rise? Does the rise make that much difference with regard to posture? Wondering if my might feel more confident with a flat bar. I'm 48 and have had back issues keep off my bike a lot over the years. But I want a fun ride.

I got a Jones H-bar 2.5 loop (riser) that does what it says. The rise is probably better for my back and neck and my wrists feel much better than with the stock bar. But some control seems sacrificed due to the rise. It's been too cold and wet since just after I installed it so I haven't had a chance to really vet the bar with the rise more than a few miles.

Thanks
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I have I think 5 bikes with Jones bars but they are all the flat SG. However I have also used riser stems and low/no angle stems interchangeably and I can say I prefer the rise to take pressure off my wrists. It makes a measurable difference. I deal with back issues differently via suspension seatposts (Kinekt, Thudbuster) and - a more recent addition that turned into sort of a miracle - the Kinekt raised suspension stem with upgrades for both spring and dampener.

I've never felt the need to add to the rise further by going to the riser version of the H bar. But this is totally subjective. You literally just have to try alternatives and see how it goes. I can say this: The rise you are going to get on the bars will be similar to the 40-degree/130mm Ritchey stems I have used... You will not notice a change in terms of your riding position (assuming you chose the right stem length) but you will *feel* the difference in terms of pain level. So again... unfortunately you have to just try stuff out yourself.

Are you SURE your perception of control is due to the rise? The Jones bars move your hands further back and depending on stem length, this can make you feel like you are leaning over the bar and losing some control. I've fixed that with a longer stem. You want the hands further back so you can sit up, but depending on top tube length etc. its something you need to do a little tuning to get right sometimes.
 

murbot

Member
Region
USA
City
MOUNT AIRY, MD USA
I have I think 5 bikes with Jones bars but they are all the flat SG. However I have also used riser stems and low/no angle stems interchangeably and I can say I prefer the rise to take pressure off my wrists. It makes a measurable difference. I deal with back issues differently via suspension seatposts (Kinekt, Thudbuster) and - a more recent addition that turned into sort of a miracle - the Kinekt raised suspension stem with upgrades for both spring and dampener.

I've never felt the need to add to the rise further by going to the riser version of the H bar. But this is totally subjective. You literally just have to try alternatives and see how it goes. I can say this: The rise you are going to get on the bars will be similar to the 40-degree/130mm Ritchey stems I have used... You will not notice a change in terms of your riding position (assuming you chose the right stem length) but you will *feel* the difference in terms of pain level. So again... unfortunately you have to just try stuff out yourself.

Are you SURE your perception of control is due to the rise? The Jones bars move your hands further back and depending on stem length, this can make you feel like you are leaning over the bar and losing some control. I've fixed that with a longer stem. You want the hands further back so you can sit up, but depending on top tube length etc. its something you need to do a little tuning to get right sometimes.
Thank you. Great info.

I'm using this on a folding fat tire bike with a stem riser already included. Meant to mention that. It's not too high, but I've got a very slight feeling of riding a laid back motorcycle with raised handlebars....very slight. I got the longer 710mm bar (vs 660) and am considering cutting the ends a bit. But I want to get some more experience with it when I focus on the ride and not the freezing. lol

You reinforced what I was thinking. I'll need to try the flat bar before I can understand which works better for me. I'll get one and my wife can use the riser on her bike if she likes.

Thanks
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Glad I could help even if only a bit.

I personally would get rid of that stem riser first. Those things are a menace. I'm assuming you mean one of these:

51CT1pOFZAL._AC_SL1000_[1].jpg


I have all of mine at the wider width. In fact I have recently found I very much like extending them to roughly 800mm. Not something everyone would do by any means. the extra length provides a nice sit-up-and-back option for the times you are cruising and for sure won't be needing the brakes in an instant. I use thick aluminum tubing cut to fit within the available length of straight gauge alloy in the bars, affixed VERY firmly with a silicone wrap over the inner tube, then covered with Wolf Tooth Mega Paw (my choice for that extra diameter) grips, two per side and sealed together with the same silicone tape used as a grip wrap.
pxl_20211208_153652111.jpg


Even if I didn't extend the bars, I do something very similar with the grips. the silicone grips wrapped in silicone tape are very survivable over time and if you take a divot out of them, the self-adhesive silicone tape sticks to itself so you can just do another wrap and ... instant repair.

PXL_20210323_003006785.jpg
 
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Bicyclista

Active Member
I have been using a 710mm Jones H-Bar with 2.5-inch rise plus a stem riser for several years on my 2016 Haibike AllMtn ebike. If anything, I found the Jones H-Bar provides more control, not less. I also like the extra real estate for cockpit gadgets. Just like @m@Robertson, I put a lot of stuff on them: bell, lights, GoPro, iPhone, etc.
 

murbot

Member
Region
USA
City
MOUNT AIRY, MD USA
Thank you

m@robertson -
Stem: I'm stuck with the stem rise on this bike. It's a hybrid\campground use bike for a couple years while I heal and hopefully get back to some mt biking before too long.

Width: I like the feel of the 710 when cruising, but things get tight for me often enough that my ends will snag. I might take as little as 12-15mm of each end.

Test: I bundled up and took a 10 minute test ride today. I raised the seat higher the way I've always sat on my mt bike, so my legs are close to straight on the down stroke. It's an improvement over how I felt with my previous test, but I still feel like I'd have better control with a flat. Would be great if there was a way a perform a quick change for different types of rides. I'll plan on testing or purchasing a flat soon.

Eager to wrap the bar, but need to figure out which one I'll use. lol

IMG_7864.jpeg
IMG_7865.jpeg
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@Bicyclista - The 2.5 H bar is absolutely better than the stock bar and I 100% agree about the mounting space. But I'll have to test a flat H bar before I can be settle in with either one. The positioning of the flat version just seems like I'll feel more connected to the tires. It could go the other way though.
I'll update the thread once I wrap my head around this
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
FWIW, this has been my experience. Please remember this is a matter of personal preference and not everyone will have the same opinion.

I have identical bikes, one with Jones H flat bars and the other with 2.5" rise. I prefer the rise since it provides a more comfortable ride. I can sit in a more upright position with less strain on my wrists. I see absolutely no difference in control between the flat and rise bars.
 

murbot

Member
Region
USA
City
MOUNT AIRY, MD USA
FWIW, this has been my experience. Please remember this is a matter of personal preference and not everyone will have the same opinion.

I have identical bikes, one with Jones H flat bars and the other with 2.5" rise. I prefer the rise since it provides a more comfortable ride. I can sit in a more upright position with less strain on my wrists. I see absolutely no difference in control between the flat and rise bars.
Thank you. Appreciate the input. I'm slicing a few mm's off the H bar with the rise in a couple minutes. I don't think the 660 would be wide enough, but the 710 is juuuuust a bit outside for me.
Some more time to dial the positioning in better may be all I really need with regard to the rise.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
Thank you. Appreciate the input. I'm slicing a few mm's off the H bar with the rise in a couple minutes. I don't think the 660 would be wide enough, but the 710 is juuuuust a bit outside for me.
Some more time to dial the positioning in better may be all I really need with regard to the rise.
Be sure you maintain enough straight bar space to mount your controls. Learned that lesson the hard way.

BTW, for me anyway, just a slight change in the bar angle made a big difference in wrist comfort.
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
It's a hybrid\campground use bike
Yikes. Your unusual geometry on that bike is going to dictate your answers. I think unless someone else has a bike like that with Jones bars then none of us know what the right answer is or could be. You just gotta feel your way thru this.

One thing though: Using short grips like that its going to be tough to evaluate how useful the wider bars are. Maybe remove them completely and use gloves with pads if you have them? I do that with mine before I finalize the layout on a given bar. Its really tough to remove the silicone grips I use so I have to do without while I am evaluating a setup.