Juggernaut Classic vs HD

Hypotomoose

New Member
Would anyone have any insights to share on comparing the Juggernaut Classic vs Juggernaut HD? As best as I can tell, the primary differences are a more powerful motor, better quality rear derailleur/shifter and better brakes, all favouring the Juggernaut HD. Is that roughly correct?
The price difference is $800 Canadian - is that worth it, particularly the upgrade from Shimano Tourney to Deore? (I'm planning potential all-year commuting, including frigid winters, so I'm a bit worried how Tourney would hold up versus higher end components).
Any thoughts people have would be much appreciated! Thanks!
 

Deafcat

Active Member
Where abouts in Canada are you considering year-round commute? I'm in Saskatoon and ride my Jug Ultra year-round, lots of experience with the process.

If you're anywhere with colder than -15C often in winter, I'd definitely spring for trustworthy hydraulic brakes... That being said, I think both of the bikes have great brakes on them so it's probably not an issue (mine are single piston Tektro, the Biktrix hydraulics I think are mostly identical).

As for the drivetrain, this is where I would certainly favor the HD, unless you don't have any hills and the 8-speed will get you around just fine. Deore 10 is definitely more robust, but if you aren't bashing your derailleur on the ground too often (this is actually a legit winter concern), not a huge difference there.

If you get icy roads often in winter, that's where I would be most concerned TBH... stopping power and robust gearing do nothing to keep you upright in adverse slippery conditions. That's a challenge best solved with choice of tire, especially studded, which I rely on daily in the winter for my commute routes, health (less stress) and safety (less wipeouts).


Ultimately, I think both of these are good winter bike choices, the HD will be the sportier of the pair with a bit more top end power, road speed, and more gears (with added stopping power to suit). Just don't forget to budget for winter tires when the season arrives, unless icy pavement/paved trails isn't something you're forced to contend with. Cheers!
 

Hypotomoose

New Member
Where abouts in Canada are you considering year-round commute? I'm in Saskatoon and ride my Jug Ultra year-round, lots of experience with the process.

If you're anywhere with colder than -15C often in winter, I'd definitely spring for trustworthy hydraulic brakes... That being said, I think both of the bikes have great brakes on them so it's probably not an issue (mine are single piston Tektro, the Biktrix hydraulics I think are mostly identical).

As for the drivetrain, this is where I would certainly favor the HD, unless you don't have any hills and the 8-speed will get you around just fine. Deore 10 is definitely more robust, but if you aren't bashing your derailleur on the ground too often (this is actually a legit winter concern), not a huge difference there.

If you get icy roads often in winter, that's where I would be most concerned TBH... stopping power and robust gearing do nothing to keep you upright in adverse slippery conditions. That's a challenge best solved with choice of tire, especially studded, which I rely on daily in the winter for my commute routes, health (less stress) and safety (less wipeouts).


Ultimately, I think both of these are good winter bike choices, the HD will be the sportier of the pair with a bit more top end power, road speed, and more gears (with added stopping power to suit). Just don't forget to budget for winter tires when the season arrives, unless icy pavement/paved trails isn't something you're forced to contend with. Cheers!

I live in Edmonton - so -15C or colder is most definitely a normal thing in winter! :) There are definitely hills, although only one on my commute. Icy pavement/trails are pretty common too - and would also be my top concern for winter. I like the idea of a more robust drivetrain with more gears, but that $800 difference makes me wince - and would also potentially dent a budget for winter tires, as you noted it's important to consider! (As you may be able to tell, I'm waffling- the joy of being indecisive)

What tires do you use, winter and non-winter, if I may ask? Are they fairly easy to change yourself? And how do you find your Ultra in non-winter conditions?

Thanks so much for sharing your experience, that helps a lot!
 

Deafcat

Active Member
I run Terrene Cake Eaters with studs in winter, remove studs for rest of the year. Takes a bit of time, so this coming winter I'm just going to build another wheel set for winter only.

The bike is amazing, definitely the favourite in my garage!
 

Feliz

Well-Known Member
HD is the only way to go, it's the favourite out of the nine eBikes in my stable some costing double what the Juggernaught costs.
 

Feliz

Well-Known Member
I know winters aren't what they used to be but riding a bike in the winter in Edmonton........YIKES. I guess you can tell I'm in Vancouver although I did live in Edmonton and Winnipeg for a few winters in the sixties. OUCH!
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
If you're on budget, I'd check out the Eunorau Fat HD.
The Eunorau already comes with suspension fork, higher capacity battery (48V 16Ah), and cheaper.

And yes they will ship to Canada.
Make sure to type int he coupon code "Eunorau" for discount.

The downside is, Eunorau will ship the bike from China, so it will take longer.
If Biktrix has stock in Canada, you will get the bike quicker.
So I'll let you work on your cost-benefit analysis. 🤓

 

Hypotomoose

New Member
I know winters aren't what they used to be but riding a bike in the winter in Edmonton........YIKES. I guess you can tell I'm in Vancouver although I did live in Edmonton and Winnipeg for a few winters in the sixties. OUCH!

I'm fortunate that my distance to work isn't TOO far - but it's still really damn cold and icy some days. An ebike is much cheaper than a car, though, and likely safer (and quicker) than transit for the near future - so.... we'll see. :) Thanks for your thoughts on the HD, it does look really good!
 

Hypotomoose

New Member
If you're on budget, I'd check out the Eunorau Fat HD.
The Eunorau already comes with suspension fork, higher capacity battery (48V 16Ah), and cheaper.

And yes they will ship to Canada.
Make sure to type int he coupon code "Eunorau" for discount.

The downside is, Eunorau will ship the bike from China, so it will take longer.
If Biktrix has stock in Canada, you will get the bike quicker.
So I'll let you work on your cost-benefit analysis. 🤓


Thanks, I had not heard of these folks before - will have a look!
 

Hypotomoose

New Member
I run Terrene Cake Eaters with studs in winter, remove studs for rest of the year. Takes a bit of time, so this coming winter I'm just going to build another wheel set for winter only.

The bike is amazing, definitely the favourite in my garage!
Thanks for the info, greatly appreciated!
 

Deafcat

Active Member
Eunerau likely doesn't provide lifetime frame warranty with the certainty Biktrix does, but the whole warranty and customer service thing probably you already know (Biktrix has an industry-leading reputation for excellence in these regards).

As for ebikes beating cars, you're damn right they do, I can easily beat my friends commute times even in Saskatoon, which has comparatively light traffic for a Canadian city). The more traffic, the more an ebike wins.
 

Hypotomoose

New Member
Eunerau likely doesn't provide lifetime frame warranty with the certainty Biktrix does, but the whole warranty and customer service thing probably you already know (Biktrix has an industry-leading reputation for excellence in these regards).

As for ebikes beating cars, you're damn right they do, I can easily beat my friends commute times even in Saskatoon, which has comparatively light traffic for a Canadian city). The more traffic, the more an ebike wins.
I have heard/read that about Biktrix and their support- and I’d like to support a provincial neighbour if I can. :) Just need to figure out my personal cost and component comfort level!
Thanks!!
 

dmark

Active Member
I rode an Ultra during the winter in Edmonton 2018-2019 and one commute to begin the winter of 2019 during which I broke my shoulder, slipping on some ice on the hill across the bridge from the ball statue. I was going downhill and not even using the motor. But ice had built up during the day, and I didn't notice it until I was riding on it too fast at night.

My Ultra came with SRAM components. I don't know how to advise you on components, but I would buy some armor. This Troy Lee armor vest came in the mail the day of my fateful commute (My wife had to cut me out of it.), but I might have been better off wearing my cheaper Chinese armor jacket. I was wearing my Chinese armor pants and didn't even realize until later, from the hole in the knee of my rain pants, that I had also impacted my knee.

It's funny that you mention cycling being safer than transit. I was mugged waiting for the bus to start the winter of 2017. Then my touring bike was stolen from the garage in the summer of 2018, prompting my foray into winter ebiking. The muggers just broke my nose, so for me, transit is safer.

If I ever ride in winter again, I am wondering if thinner studded tires (better for ice) is a better way to go than unstudded fat tires (better for deep snow). Edmonton ice is a real cycling hazard.
 

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Hypotomoose

New Member
I rode an Ultra during the winter in Edmonton 2018-2019 and one commute to begin the winter of 2019 during which I broke my shoulder, slipping on some ice on the hill across the bridge from the ball statue. I was going downhill and not even using the motor. But ice had built up during the day, and I didn't notice it until I was riding on it too fast at night.

My Ultra came with SRAM components. I don't know how to advise you on components, but I would buy some armor. This Troy Lee armor vest came in the mail the day of my fateful commute (My wife had to cut me out of it.), but I might have been better off wearing my cheaper Chinese armor jacket. I was wearing my Chinese armor pants and didn't even realize until later, from the hole in the knee of my rain pants, that I had also impacted my knee.

It's funny that you mention cycling being safer than transit. I was mugged waiting for the bus to start the winter of 2017. Then my touring bike was stolen from the garage in the summer of 2018, prompting my foray into winter ebiking. The muggers just broke my nose, so for me, transit is safer.

If I ever ride in winter again, I am wondering if thinner studded tires (better for ice) is a better way to go than unstudded fat tires (better for deep snow). Edmonton ice is a real cycling hazard.
Ouch!! Hopefully you’ve recovered from that spill! Agree with Edmonton ice as a significant hazard, I’d definitely be looking at studded tires for winter. The armor seems like a good idea too! Thanks!
 

Hypotomoose

New Member
Wanting to complete a loop here - have ended up purchasing a Juggernaut Classic but will be upgrading the drivetrain to Deore for a pretty reasonable price. Kudos to the customer support at Biktrix for helping me with a number of questions, including Roshan himself.

Now I just have to wait for the bike! Mid-July (ish) can't come fast enough!

Thanks to all who commented and provided their perspectives - you're awesome!