Juiced Fat or Thin ?

Colorado Colin

New Member
I am looking to do an 18 mile commute to work each way, mostly on paved trail (with around 800 ft of elevation gain). I weigh about 230 lbs and have a bad knee (not because I weigh 230 lbs !!) therefore the option of getting an EBike has become really attractive. I have been doing a lot of research and for the budget I have (around $1500) there are a few options, but Juiced Bikes seem to be one of the best out there (build quality, upgradeability, battery options, reputation and an owner that is invested in his products and with challenging the EBike market) for that sort of money and I am therefore looking to buy one (unless I could be persuaded otherwise) . I thought I had decided on the Crosscurrent Air with an upgraded battery and an aftermarket front suspension fork and saddle, but then I saw the HypeFat bike and felt like it would offer more opportunity to ride it all year round (I ride at least 3 times a week on trails, but nothing too steep now !) in all conditions (I am particularly looking to ride in the snow).

As the bike would primarily be used for commuting - can anyone give any advice or opinions on which bike to go for out of the models Juiced offer (or an alternative bike for similar money)?
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
I am looking to do an 18 mile commute to work each way

If you go with the Juiced HyperFat the standard 13ah battery won't get you 36 miles so you'll either need to charge the battery at work or invest in a battery upgrade. Karl Gesslein has reviews of several Fat ebikes including both factory and DIY builds plus lots of useful tips like buy a thudbuster seatpost suspension for riding on snowmobile/ATV trails.
 
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J.R.

Well-Known Member
Ride a fat and thin normal, non ebikes and get a sense of the additional power needed to get the job done with a fat. That'll give you a good idea of what you'll be able to do. I've commuted in the Northeast thousands of ebike miles, 34 mile r/t with both a 16 ah and a 11.6 ah battery without charging midway. I use carbide studded tires in snow and ice, given I'm not a kid, it hurts to go down. The only time I considered a fat was a few winters ago I rode a few months on an ice rutted rail trail that beat me up, switching from a Thudbuster to a BodyFloat solved the issue.

Full disclosure, I'm not a fatbike fan. I am a motorcycle guy and I think many fatbikes look really cool, but after riding a non powered one, I realised it's just not for me. FWIW

Good luck to you! Nobody can really help you decide what will work for you. Your task is doable, you might just have to try some bikes. Test some non powered bikes that have similar style and geometry to Juiced. JR is a good company, by all reports. Either bike should be quality, and backed up quality. Most important, have fun!
 
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ebikes rock

New Member
nobody but you can ultimately decide. test riding is a great way to decide for yourself.

I have a cross-current and I absolutely love it. If I could convince myself of an actual NEED for the fat bike, I'd buy it too. But, here's the thing: I think fat bikes have really limited use. They are awesome in deep snow (or deep sand or deep mud). I note your name features Colorado, so I'll posit a ski/snowboard analogy. As a skier, I can attest that fat skis are great on super deep powder days. But fat skis in two inches of fluff? not as fun (*opinion alert*). I think the fat bikes are like fat skis ---great in the unique conditions for which they were designed, but not as great in the less-than-ideal. My understanding is that snowboards (fat) are better in deep snow and less fun on ice....

I think the thin e-bike would deliver better utility for the cost. Simply because those fat tires are designed to excel in deep squishy surfaces. If you are commuting every day on a hardpack trail, those fat tires won't really do anything special. Don't get me wrong - they will work. But you don't "need" them. MY OPINION. I'm NOT saying fat bikes are the devil. I'm not saying "thin" e-bikes are better. Just my opinion on the trade off between the two.

Again, nobody but you can ultimately decide. JR is right-on....try to test ride as many as possible.
 

Bicyclista

Active Member
If you want to ride in snow, on dirt trails, as well as commute on pavement, get the HyperFat. However, be aware that by the time you add all the upgrades (1,000-watt motor, cadence+torque sensor, front suspension fork, bigger battery, rack & fenders, hydraulic brakes) the cost is likely to exceed $2,500.

The CrossCurrent Air would be a good commuter bike. However, if you want a suspension fork you might as well buy a regular CrossCurrent—good aftermarket forks are expensive and there is no guarantee they will work on the Air (does the Air have a suspension-corrected geometry?). You can buy a refurbished CrossCurrent directly from Juiced for $1,299 and use the savings to pay for a bigger battery. With the regular CrossCurrent you also get better brakes, a better derailleur, and a cadence+torque sensor, all worthwhile IMHO.
 

Colorado Colin

New Member
Thanks for all the information that you have posted, it has helped.. I think!! :) To confuse things further, I have also been looking at getting a stock bike converting it myself with 1000w BBHSD motor kit. I rode Surly fat bike conversion at my local community bike shop and it was amazing, so much power and the hacked version easily got over the 25mph mark and with a bigger battery would give me the mileage I am looking at in pedal assist mode. I can get that kit for around $1200 and decision I then have is what bike to put it one !! I am looking at one of the Motobecane's for about $500, either the hybrid or fat bike with the total being $1700 - $1800....... but then as I write this I am back to why not just buy the Crosscurrent or the Hyperfat ... I am still so confused !! A drink is on order !
 

Dunbar

Well-Known Member
I would go with Hyperfat 1000W MAC motor with a torque sensor and hydraulic disc brakes over a BBSHD conversion. Pick the battery option that suits your range requirements. The upgraded Hyper Fat does 1500W peak so you don't lose any power over a BBSHD. Once you've ridden a bike with a good torque sensor it's hard to go back to cadence sensing. Honestly, at current price points I can't see how it makes sense to go the DIY route since you aren't really saving any money as used to be the case. I have a Cross Current but it peaks at half the power of the Hyper Fat so if you liked the power of the BBSHD I'd recommend going with the Hyper Fat.
 

Bicyclista

Active Member
I agree with Dunbar. The good news is that the suspension fork is now standard equipment on the Hyperfat. IMHO the only reason to go DIY is to convert a bike you really like and for which there is no ebike equivalent.